Who's in Charge? Free Will and the Science of the Brain

Who's in Charge? Free Will and the Science of the Brain

?Big questions are Gazzaniga?s stock in trade.? ?New York Times ?Gazzaniga is one of the most brilliant experimental neuroscientists in the world.? ?Tom Wolfe ?Gazzaniga stands as a giant among neuroscientists, for both the quality of his research and his ability to communicate it to a general public with infectious enthusiasm.? ?Robert Bazell, Chief Science Correspondent, NBC ?Big questions are Gazzaniga?s stock in trade.? ?New York Times ?Gazzaniga...

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Title:Who's in Charge? Free Will and the Science of the Brain
Author:Michael S. Gazzaniga
Rating:
Genres:Science
ISBN:Who's in Charge? Free Will and the Science of the Brain
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:260 pages pages

Who's in Charge? Free Will and the Science of the Brain Reviews

  • David Gross
    Feb 18, 2012

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

    Very interesting book on the issue of the deterministic view ( biological, fysical and chemical,processes determine decisions you take). The empirical evidence shows that decision making is done before issues come to a conscient level in the brain. This suggests the deterministic viewp...

    Gazzaniga discusses a lot of interesting psychology and neuropsychology research that is more-or-less relevant to the question whether our apparently voluntary behavior is a product of free-will versus being the inevitable result of a chain of causes over which we have no control. Some...

    Amazon review: The father of cognitive neuroscience and author of Human offers a provocative argument against the common belief that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes and we are therefore not responsible for our actions A powerful orthodoxy in the study of the b...

    Unlike the fantastic philosopher Daniel C. Dennett who carved out a bit of elbow room for free will in a deterministic world, Gazzaniga blows past the idea as miscast and arcane. So while the title does say "Free Will" it's a bit misleading. This is a good neuroscience book that plays ...

    Good book! I was expecting an overview/summary/introduction to the current state of neuroscience in regards to consciousness and free will. I did get that, but also some focus on what this means for the legal system, which was interesting but not exactly what I was looking for. Next I ...

    Michael Gazzaniga can talk about the brain from the position of authority as he was there when most of the recent breakthroughs in neuroscience were made. "Who's in charge" gives a brief overview of recent research explaining some of the common questions about brain functioning. In p...

    A great book. Just the introduction to neuroscience was amazing. If you want an accessible overview of our modern understanding of the brain, this is the place to start. The author's discussion of how we consider guilt and innocence in the context of our evolving understanding of the b...

    Excellent book; probably among the best I have read all year. I found the ebook on a bargain on Amazon, and thought it looked interesting. As I was reading it I happened to mention it to a professor of neuroscience and he informed me that Gazzaniga is a well-respected name in the fiel...

    Neuroscientist and Gifford Lecturer Michael S. Gazzinga explores the implications of the latest research in brain research, namely, that we live in a "determined" world, that our brains are governed by the laws of the physical world and not our conscious selves. If our conscious selves...

    First chapters describes how the brain functions according to the current knowledge (2011). From there the main question as given in the introduction is explored: ?We are personally responsible agents and are to be held accountable for our actions, even though we live in a determin...

    The first 2/3 or so of this book are really great. Gazzaniga is a neuroscientist with extensive experience working with split-brain patients, and his account of how the brain works is well-written and fascinating. Unfortunately, once he ventures off the reservation of his own specialty...

    If everything, including you and me, is made up of material that blindly obeys the inflexible laws of physics, then everything that happens, including what you and I do, is inevitable, and free will is something of an illusion or a joke. Right? Or are we just thinking of the ques...

  • David
    Feb 18, 2012

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

  • Trevor
    Dec 19, 2012

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

  • Kevin
    Jan 13, 2012

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

    Very interesting book on the issue of the deterministic view ( biological, fysical and chemical,processes determine decisions you take). The empirical evidence shows that decision making is done before issues come to a conscient level in the brain. This suggests the deterministic viewp...

    Gazzaniga discusses a lot of interesting psychology and neuropsychology research that is more-or-less relevant to the question whether our apparently voluntary behavior is a product of free-will versus being the inevitable result of a chain of causes over which we have no control. Some...

    Amazon review: The father of cognitive neuroscience and author of Human offers a provocative argument against the common belief that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes and we are therefore not responsible for our actions A powerful orthodoxy in the study of the b...

    Unlike the fantastic philosopher Daniel C. Dennett who carved out a bit of elbow room for free will in a deterministic world, Gazzaniga blows past the idea as miscast and arcane. So while the title does say "Free Will" it's a bit misleading. This is a good neuroscience book that plays ...

    Good book! I was expecting an overview/summary/introduction to the current state of neuroscience in regards to consciousness and free will. I did get that, but also some focus on what this means for the legal system, which was interesting but not exactly what I was looking for. Next I ...

    Michael Gazzaniga can talk about the brain from the position of authority as he was there when most of the recent breakthroughs in neuroscience were made. "Who's in charge" gives a brief overview of recent research explaining some of the common questions about brain functioning. In p...

    A great book. Just the introduction to neuroscience was amazing. If you want an accessible overview of our modern understanding of the brain, this is the place to start. The author's discussion of how we consider guilt and innocence in the context of our evolving understanding of the b...

  • Jennifer
    May 03, 2013

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

    Very interesting book on the issue of the deterministic view ( biological, fysical and chemical,processes determine decisions you take). The empirical evidence shows that decision making is done before issues come to a conscient level in the brain. This suggests the deterministic viewp...

    Gazzaniga discusses a lot of interesting psychology and neuropsychology research that is more-or-less relevant to the question whether our apparently voluntary behavior is a product of free-will versus being the inevitable result of a chain of causes over which we have no control. Some...

    Amazon review: The father of cognitive neuroscience and author of Human offers a provocative argument against the common belief that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes and we are therefore not responsible for our actions A powerful orthodoxy in the study of the b...

    Unlike the fantastic philosopher Daniel C. Dennett who carved out a bit of elbow room for free will in a deterministic world, Gazzaniga blows past the idea as miscast and arcane. So while the title does say "Free Will" it's a bit misleading. This is a good neuroscience book that plays ...

    Good book! I was expecting an overview/summary/introduction to the current state of neuroscience in regards to consciousness and free will. I did get that, but also some focus on what this means for the legal system, which was interesting but not exactly what I was looking for. Next I ...

  • Shiloah
    Nov 29, 2017

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

  • Kaethe Douglas
    Dec 13, 2011

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

  • Patrick
    Apr 17, 2012

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

    Very interesting book on the issue of the deterministic view ( biological, fysical and chemical,processes determine decisions you take). The empirical evidence shows that decision making is done before issues come to a conscient level in the brain. This suggests the deterministic viewp...

    Gazzaniga discusses a lot of interesting psychology and neuropsychology research that is more-or-less relevant to the question whether our apparently voluntary behavior is a product of free-will versus being the inevitable result of a chain of causes over which we have no control. Some...

    Amazon review: The father of cognitive neuroscience and author of Human offers a provocative argument against the common belief that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes and we are therefore not responsible for our actions A powerful orthodoxy in the study of the b...

  • Will Byrnes
    Apr 25, 2012

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

  • Hayley
    Jul 21, 2014

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

  • B. Rule
    Nov 27, 2018

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

    Very interesting book on the issue of the deterministic view ( biological, fysical and chemical,processes determine decisions you take). The empirical evidence shows that decision making is done before issues come to a conscient level in the brain. This suggests the deterministic viewp...

    Gazzaniga discusses a lot of interesting psychology and neuropsychology research that is more-or-less relevant to the question whether our apparently voluntary behavior is a product of free-will versus being the inevitable result of a chain of causes over which we have no control. Some...

    Amazon review: The father of cognitive neuroscience and author of Human offers a provocative argument against the common belief that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes and we are therefore not responsible for our actions A powerful orthodoxy in the study of the b...

    Unlike the fantastic philosopher Daniel C. Dennett who carved out a bit of elbow room for free will in a deterministic world, Gazzaniga blows past the idea as miscast and arcane. So while the title does say "Free Will" it's a bit misleading. This is a good neuroscience book that plays ...

    Good book! I was expecting an overview/summary/introduction to the current state of neuroscience in regards to consciousness and free will. I did get that, but also some focus on what this means for the legal system, which was interesting but not exactly what I was looking for. Next I ...

    Michael Gazzaniga can talk about the brain from the position of authority as he was there when most of the recent breakthroughs in neuroscience were made. "Who's in charge" gives a brief overview of recent research explaining some of the common questions about brain functioning. In p...

    A great book. Just the introduction to neuroscience was amazing. If you want an accessible overview of our modern understanding of the brain, this is the place to start. The author's discussion of how we consider guilt and innocence in the context of our evolving understanding of the b...

    Excellent book; probably among the best I have read all year. I found the ebook on a bargain on Amazon, and thought it looked interesting. As I was reading it I happened to mention it to a professor of neuroscience and he informed me that Gazzaniga is a well-respected name in the fiel...

    Neuroscientist and Gifford Lecturer Michael S. Gazzinga explores the implications of the latest research in brain research, namely, that we live in a "determined" world, that our brains are governed by the laws of the physical world and not our conscious selves. If our conscious selves...

    First chapters describes how the brain functions according to the current knowledge (2011). From there the main question as given in the introduction is explored: ?We are personally responsible agents and are to be held accountable for our actions, even though we live in a determin...

    The first 2/3 or so of this book are really great. Gazzaniga is a neuroscientist with extensive experience working with split-brain patients, and his account of how the brain works is well-written and fascinating. Unfortunately, once he ventures off the reservation of his own specialty...

  • Bob Nichols
    Aug 25, 2012

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

  • Andy Oram
    Mar 29, 2018

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

  • Caren
    Jan 20, 2012

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

  • James
    Nov 09, 2011

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

    Very interesting book on the issue of the deterministic view ( biological, fysical and chemical,processes determine decisions you take). The empirical evidence shows that decision making is done before issues come to a conscient level in the brain. This suggests the deterministic viewp...

    Gazzaniga discusses a lot of interesting psychology and neuropsychology research that is more-or-less relevant to the question whether our apparently voluntary behavior is a product of free-will versus being the inevitable result of a chain of causes over which we have no control. Some...

    Amazon review: The father of cognitive neuroscience and author of Human offers a provocative argument against the common belief that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes and we are therefore not responsible for our actions A powerful orthodoxy in the study of the b...

    Unlike the fantastic philosopher Daniel C. Dennett who carved out a bit of elbow room for free will in a deterministic world, Gazzaniga blows past the idea as miscast and arcane. So while the title does say "Free Will" it's a bit misleading. This is a good neuroscience book that plays ...

  • Aaron
    Nov 18, 2011

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

  • Michal
    Nov 18, 2015

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

    Very interesting book on the issue of the deterministic view ( biological, fysical and chemical,processes determine decisions you take). The empirical evidence shows that decision making is done before issues come to a conscient level in the brain. This suggests the deterministic viewp...

    Gazzaniga discusses a lot of interesting psychology and neuropsychology research that is more-or-less relevant to the question whether our apparently voluntary behavior is a product of free-will versus being the inevitable result of a chain of causes over which we have no control. Some...

    Amazon review: The father of cognitive neuroscience and author of Human offers a provocative argument against the common belief that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes and we are therefore not responsible for our actions A powerful orthodoxy in the study of the b...

    Unlike the fantastic philosopher Daniel C. Dennett who carved out a bit of elbow room for free will in a deterministic world, Gazzaniga blows past the idea as miscast and arcane. So while the title does say "Free Will" it's a bit misleading. This is a good neuroscience book that plays ...

    Good book! I was expecting an overview/summary/introduction to the current state of neuroscience in regards to consciousness and free will. I did get that, but also some focus on what this means for the legal system, which was interesting but not exactly what I was looking for. Next I ...

    Michael Gazzaniga can talk about the brain from the position of authority as he was there when most of the recent breakthroughs in neuroscience were made. "Who's in charge" gives a brief overview of recent research explaining some of the common questions about brain functioning. In p...

  • The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon)
    Jan 17, 2015

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

  • Book
    Jan 01, 2012

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

  • H Wesselius
    Dec 22, 2011

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

  • Ed
    Dec 08, 2011

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

  • Matthew
    Sep 01, 2017

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

    Very interesting book on the issue of the deterministic view ( biological, fysical and chemical,processes determine decisions you take). The empirical evidence shows that decision making is done before issues come to a conscient level in the brain. This suggests the deterministic viewp...

    Gazzaniga discusses a lot of interesting psychology and neuropsychology research that is more-or-less relevant to the question whether our apparently voluntary behavior is a product of free-will versus being the inevitable result of a chain of causes over which we have no control. Some...

    Amazon review: The father of cognitive neuroscience and author of Human offers a provocative argument against the common belief that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes and we are therefore not responsible for our actions A powerful orthodoxy in the study of the b...

    Unlike the fantastic philosopher Daniel C. Dennett who carved out a bit of elbow room for free will in a deterministic world, Gazzaniga blows past the idea as miscast and arcane. So while the title does say "Free Will" it's a bit misleading. This is a good neuroscience book that plays ...

    Good book! I was expecting an overview/summary/introduction to the current state of neuroscience in regards to consciousness and free will. I did get that, but also some focus on what this means for the legal system, which was interesting but not exactly what I was looking for. Next I ...

    Michael Gazzaniga can talk about the brain from the position of authority as he was there when most of the recent breakthroughs in neuroscience were made. "Who's in charge" gives a brief overview of recent research explaining some of the common questions about brain functioning. In p...

    A great book. Just the introduction to neuroscience was amazing. If you want an accessible overview of our modern understanding of the brain, this is the place to start. The author's discussion of how we consider guilt and innocence in the context of our evolving understanding of the b...

    Excellent book; probably among the best I have read all year. I found the ebook on a bargain on Amazon, and thought it looked interesting. As I was reading it I happened to mention it to a professor of neuroscience and he informed me that Gazzaniga is a well-respected name in the fiel...

  • Eliza
    Sep 30, 2017

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

  • Joseph Monaco
    Aug 27, 2012

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

  • Andris
    Mar 03, 2013

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

  • Suncerae
    Oct 02, 2017

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

    Very interesting book on the issue of the deterministic view ( biological, fysical and chemical,processes determine decisions you take). The empirical evidence shows that decision making is done before issues come to a conscient level in the brain. This suggests the deterministic viewp...

    Gazzaniga discusses a lot of interesting psychology and neuropsychology research that is more-or-less relevant to the question whether our apparently voluntary behavior is a product of free-will versus being the inevitable result of a chain of causes over which we have no control. Some...

    Amazon review: The father of cognitive neuroscience and author of Human offers a provocative argument against the common belief that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes and we are therefore not responsible for our actions A powerful orthodoxy in the study of the b...

    Unlike the fantastic philosopher Daniel C. Dennett who carved out a bit of elbow room for free will in a deterministic world, Gazzaniga blows past the idea as miscast and arcane. So while the title does say "Free Will" it's a bit misleading. This is a good neuroscience book that plays ...

    Good book! I was expecting an overview/summary/introduction to the current state of neuroscience in regards to consciousness and free will. I did get that, but also some focus on what this means for the legal system, which was interesting but not exactly what I was looking for. Next I ...

    Michael Gazzaniga can talk about the brain from the position of authority as he was there when most of the recent breakthroughs in neuroscience were made. "Who's in charge" gives a brief overview of recent research explaining some of the common questions about brain functioning. In p...

    A great book. Just the introduction to neuroscience was amazing. If you want an accessible overview of our modern understanding of the brain, this is the place to start. The author's discussion of how we consider guilt and innocence in the context of our evolving understanding of the b...

    Excellent book; probably among the best I have read all year. I found the ebook on a bargain on Amazon, and thought it looked interesting. As I was reading it I happened to mention it to a professor of neuroscience and he informed me that Gazzaniga is a well-respected name in the fiel...

    Neuroscientist and Gifford Lecturer Michael S. Gazzinga explores the implications of the latest research in brain research, namely, that we live in a "determined" world, that our brains are governed by the laws of the physical world and not our conscious selves. If our conscious selves...

  • Peter A.  van Tilburg
    Jun 05, 2017

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

    Very interesting book on the issue of the deterministic view ( biological, fysical and chemical,processes determine decisions you take). The empirical evidence shows that decision making is done before issues come to a conscient level in the brain. This suggests the deterministic viewp...

  • Will Simpson
    Nov 30, 2017

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

  • Bill
    Dec 29, 2018

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

    Very interesting book on the issue of the deterministic view ( biological, fysical and chemical,processes determine decisions you take). The empirical evidence shows that decision making is done before issues come to a conscient level in the brain. This suggests the deterministic viewp...

    Gazzaniga discusses a lot of interesting psychology and neuropsychology research that is more-or-less relevant to the question whether our apparently voluntary behavior is a product of free-will versus being the inevitable result of a chain of causes over which we have no control. Some...

  • Jan vanTilburg
    Aug 12, 2018

    Do people really have free will? There are those who contend that since the brain is a physical object, subject to physical laws, human behavior is pre-determined, and thus the antithesis of free. Does a lesion in one?s frontal lobe give credence to a defense of ?The Devil Made Me ...

    The start of this book is pretty much the same as Sam Harris?s Free Will. But this guy comes to the opposite conclusion. A tad frustrating, I guess, but no less interesting for that. Let?s have a look at the problem. In the middle of this book he has a really lovely analogy expl...

    Michael Gazzaniga is a leading neuroscientist, and he has written a fascinating book on the subject of free will. Interestingly, we want to have free will ourselves, but we don't want others to have it. We want other people to act efficiently, and basically to think the same way that w...

    4.5 Stars This is a very good read. Gazzaniga explains the workings of the brain in terms that rarely get technical. He puts modern understanding of the neurology of our minds into context with history, free will, evolution. Though neurology is a complex subject, Gazzaniga does a ve...

    Gazzaniga provides a succinct enough summary of current research into the brain. However, its when he addresses the notion of free will that the book falls flat. In attempt to find room for free will, he takes a detour into quantum physics and probability theory. Even if one accepts hi...

    Added to my list with some trepidation. For one thing, Tom Wolfe blurbed it, and Wolfe is a reactionary assberet, so that's hardly a glowing recommendation. And then the snippet says "counters the common wisdom that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes we cannot contro...

    Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain by Michael S. Gazzaniga "Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain" is the thought-provoking book about the fascinating topic of free will and neuroscience. Neuroscientist and gifted author Michael S. Gazzaniga p...

    Despite the author's initial claim that some vestige of free will could be salvaged from the jaws of determinism, he does a pretty good job demolishing that claim. All the while, he mucks around in the many very interesting weeds. In fact, the interesting weeds were what propped up thi...

    While searching for an appropriate stage setter for the next block of instruction at the School of Advanced Military Studies--Morality and War--I stumbled upon this fine book. I was pleased to discover that Gazzaniga?s metacognitive approach in describing the role of the brain as a c...

    The author's argument is that reductionist theories about the brain are wrong. Gazzaniga is not a determinist. The mind emerges from the physical brain; that mind is a whole that is greater than its parts. The end result is a feeling that "someone is in charge." We have free will and w...

    This is an easily readable compilation of modern ideas about how our brains work and whether their function allows for free will and personal responsibility. The information presented is revealing and thought-provoking (at least for a relative layman like me), but it does not make a st...

    This is not light reading (or, not for me anyway), but it is extremely interesting and profitable. Just last year, in "Incognito", David Eagleman indicated that some changes in legal procedures may need to take into account new findings in neuroscience. Toward the end of this book, Mr....

    this book is a wonderful collection of interesting facts and glimpses into probably very complex theories, told by a brilliant neuroscientist in an actually pretty good and easy to read language. and that is very nice. however, the book also slightly suffers structurally because of ...

    This book offers interesting observations on two levels. Scientifically, the author as a leading neuroscientist lays out a sophisticated theory of how we make decisions. Although each individual decision is driven by a complex, interacting set of "modules" in the brain, Gazzaniga does ...

    My advice for anyone who reads this book is to be sure and read the entire book carefully. In the first few chapters, Gazzaniga presents neurological determinism so convincingly that a careless reader might mistake it for the author's final position. Gazzaniga may also invite misunders...

    I attentively read about 1/3 of this book and skimmed the rest, for the sole reason that i had little time and needed specific information. But overall I can say this is a very interesting work, both dense in academic references from which one can build on later (i'm personally interes...

    A thorough argument, well delivered. Much was added to my knowledge on the subject. I enjoyed all the narrative-based examples. I especially enjoyed learning what possibilities the future holds for neuroscience. ...

    This is a book heavy on neruoscience but the author does a great job of carrying me forward. I didn't realize Michael Gazzaniga was the researcher involved in the first "split brain" patient studies. His perspective on brain mapping is fascinating. How evolution is tied to brain module...

    Very interesting book on the issue of the deterministic view ( biological, fysical and chemical,processes determine decisions you take). The empirical evidence shows that decision making is done before issues come to a conscient level in the brain. This suggests the deterministic viewp...

    Gazzaniga discusses a lot of interesting psychology and neuropsychology research that is more-or-less relevant to the question whether our apparently voluntary behavior is a product of free-will versus being the inevitable result of a chain of causes over which we have no control. Some...

    Amazon review: The father of cognitive neuroscience and author of Human offers a provocative argument against the common belief that our lives are wholly determined by physical processes and we are therefore not responsible for our actions A powerful orthodoxy in the study of the b...

    Unlike the fantastic philosopher Daniel C. Dennett who carved out a bit of elbow room for free will in a deterministic world, Gazzaniga blows past the idea as miscast and arcane. So while the title does say "Free Will" it's a bit misleading. This is a good neuroscience book that plays ...

    Good book! I was expecting an overview/summary/introduction to the current state of neuroscience in regards to consciousness and free will. I did get that, but also some focus on what this means for the legal system, which was interesting but not exactly what I was looking for. Next I ...

    Michael Gazzaniga can talk about the brain from the position of authority as he was there when most of the recent breakthroughs in neuroscience were made. "Who's in charge" gives a brief overview of recent research explaining some of the common questions about brain functioning. In p...

    A great book. Just the introduction to neuroscience was amazing. If you want an accessible overview of our modern understanding of the brain, this is the place to start. The author's discussion of how we consider guilt and innocence in the context of our evolving understanding of the b...

    Excellent book; probably among the best I have read all year. I found the ebook on a bargain on Amazon, and thought it looked interesting. As I was reading it I happened to mention it to a professor of neuroscience and he informed me that Gazzaniga is a well-respected name in the fiel...

    Neuroscientist and Gifford Lecturer Michael S. Gazzinga explores the implications of the latest research in brain research, namely, that we live in a "determined" world, that our brains are governed by the laws of the physical world and not our conscious selves. If our conscious selves...

    First chapters describes how the brain functions according to the current knowledge (2011). From there the main question as given in the introduction is explored: ?We are personally responsible agents and are to be held accountable for our actions, even though we live in a determin...