Journey to the End of the Night

Journey to the End of the Night

Louis-Ferdinand Celine's revulsion and anger at what he considered the idiocy and hypocrisy of society explodes from nearly every page of this novel. Filled with slang and obscenities and written in raw, colloquial language, Journey to the End of the Night is a literary symphony of violence, cruelty and obscene nihilism. This book shocked most critics when it was first pub Louis-Ferdinand Celine's revulsion and anger at what he considered the idiocy and hypocrisy of society explodes from near...

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Title:Journey to the End of the Night
Author:Louis-Ferdinand Céline
Rating:
Genres:Fiction
ISBN:Voyage au bout de la nuit
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:453 pages pages

Journey to the End of the Night Reviews

  • Greg
    May 17, 2007

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

  • Ben Loory
    Jul 02, 2012

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    Oct 07, 2010

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

  • RandomAnthony
    Aug 09, 2010

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

  • Alison
    Jan 05, 2008

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

  • Michael
    Apr 11, 2009

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

    Journey to the End of the Night was not what I expected. Based on the cover art and description, I had prepared myself for a grim and sombre voyage to the depths of human depravity. Maybe the book simply hasn't aged well, but I thought it was really quite tame - not at all the "literar...

    We will not consider the personal politics or prejudices of this author, if only to quell / pacify the legions of followers who attend my words throughout the globe, (about 3 people or less). Let?s forget the bad stuff that every country produces and rather we will recall some of ...

    Warning: If you've experienced melancholia or been diagnosed with depression, reading this novel may be inadvisable. <3.7 stars> "A cynic can chill and dishearten with a single word." Ralph Waldo Emerson From Journey to the End of the Night: The sadness of the world has d...

    Hilarious, scathing and-oh-so-very-bitter, Journey to the End of the Night is a beautifully written - and translated - paean to misanthropy and the general crumminess of man. The novel comprises the journeys of Cline's alter-ego, Ferdinand Bardemu, from a frightened and bewildered so...

    Finally, after a busy week, I have finished my journey to the end of this book. Savage, brutal, disgusting, repulsive, and misanthropic are not necessarily adjectives I would use to describe a masterpiece, but with Celine, they're all meant as compliments. Is it the most pessimisti...

  • Szplug
    Sep 24, 2009

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

    Journey to the End of the Night was not what I expected. Based on the cover art and description, I had prepared myself for a grim and sombre voyage to the depths of human depravity. Maybe the book simply hasn't aged well, but I thought it was really quite tame - not at all the "literar...

    We will not consider the personal politics or prejudices of this author, if only to quell / pacify the legions of followers who attend my words throughout the globe, (about 3 people or less). Let?s forget the bad stuff that every country produces and rather we will recall some of ...

    Warning: If you've experienced melancholia or been diagnosed with depression, reading this novel may be inadvisable. <3.7 stars> "A cynic can chill and dishearten with a single word." Ralph Waldo Emerson From Journey to the End of the Night: The sadness of the world has d...

    Hilarious, scathing and-oh-so-very-bitter, Journey to the End of the Night is a beautifully written - and translated - paean to misanthropy and the general crumminess of man. The novel comprises the journeys of Cline's alter-ego, Ferdinand Bardemu, from a frightened and bewildered so...

  • MJ Nicholls
    Oct 10, 2012

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

  • Ramblin'_Man
    Apr 16, 2012

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

    Journey to the End of the Night was not what I expected. Based on the cover art and description, I had prepared myself for a grim and sombre voyage to the depths of human depravity. Maybe the book simply hasn't aged well, but I thought it was really quite tame - not at all the "literar...

    We will not consider the personal politics or prejudices of this author, if only to quell / pacify the legions of followers who attend my words throughout the globe, (about 3 people or less). Let?s forget the bad stuff that every country produces and rather we will recall some of ...

    Warning: If you've experienced melancholia or been diagnosed with depression, reading this novel may be inadvisable. <3.7 stars> "A cynic can chill and dishearten with a single word." Ralph Waldo Emerson From Journey to the End of the Night: The sadness of the world has d...

    Hilarious, scathing and-oh-so-very-bitter, Journey to the End of the Night is a beautifully written - and translated - paean to misanthropy and the general crumminess of man. The novel comprises the journeys of Cline's alter-ego, Ferdinand Bardemu, from a frightened and bewildered so...

    Finally, after a busy week, I have finished my journey to the end of this book. Savage, brutal, disgusting, repulsive, and misanthropic are not necessarily adjectives I would use to describe a masterpiece, but with Celine, they're all meant as compliments. Is it the most pessimisti...

    ? This is where I drew the line when I was studying French litterature in Uni. Years after, I still can't do it. Fuck you, Louis-Ferdinand. All your writing style just can't redeem your racist, mysogynist ramblings. One might say this is fiction. This is NOT. Not when the same au...

    Originally, I thought about writing an eloquent review of this book, but intentions do not always come to bear fruit. The longer I think about it, the less apt I am to do it, so, instead of procrastinating, I'm just going to 'wing it' live on GR. Here it goes. I first borrowed ...

    ?Misery is like some horrible woman you?ve married. Maybe it?s better to end up loving her a little than to knock yourself out beating her all your life. Since obviously you won?t be able to bump her off.? Overall, Journey to the End of the Night was a very well-written, ...

    The depth and honesty of this book I think, are often misunderstood as being purely cynical, and depressing. Celine sees the complexities of humanity and gives it to you straight.The truth is an ugly thing to face, but there is beauty here too, not only in the prose, but also in the li...

    There is an afterword by William Vollmann in the book (which incidentally starts with "Reader, fuck you!...You think I give a shit whether or not you've read this book? Or that Cline's ghost does? That would be the day!") which I found to be very cool. He asks, Why is Cline a great...

    I think I got a case of retroactive clich with this one. I bet this was the classic that spawned the slowly populating genre of ?Guy eats lovely food in a restaurant with a friend he hates and rants about life?s meaninglessness? that was later contributed to by such legends ...

    Bukowski was right: "first of all read Cline; the greatest writer of 2,000 years". Its clear now, Bukowski wanted to be Celine, he failed miserably with his novels though... Anyways, "Joureny to the end of the night" is not a war novel, but still I consider it the ultimate war nov...

  • Jeffrey Keeten
    Jan 14, 2015

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

  • Hadrian
    Aug 08, 2010

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

  • Mike Puma
    Apr 01, 2011

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

  • Paul
    Nov 17, 2013

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

  • Ian "Marvin" Graye
    Nov 23, 2013

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

  • Edward
    Nov 09, 2015

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

  • Perry
    Jun 21, 2016

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

    Journey to the End of the Night was not what I expected. Based on the cover art and description, I had prepared myself for a grim and sombre voyage to the depths of human depravity. Maybe the book simply hasn't aged well, but I thought it was really quite tame - not at all the "literar...

    We will not consider the personal politics or prejudices of this author, if only to quell / pacify the legions of followers who attend my words throughout the globe, (about 3 people or less). Let?s forget the bad stuff that every country produces and rather we will recall some of ...

    Warning: If you've experienced melancholia or been diagnosed with depression, reading this novel may be inadvisable. <3.7 stars> "A cynic can chill and dishearten with a single word." Ralph Waldo Emerson From Journey to the End of the Night: The sadness of the world has d...

  • Leo Robertson
    Nov 02, 2016

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

    Journey to the End of the Night was not what I expected. Based on the cover art and description, I had prepared myself for a grim and sombre voyage to the depths of human depravity. Maybe the book simply hasn't aged well, but I thought it was really quite tame - not at all the "literar...

    We will not consider the personal politics or prejudices of this author, if only to quell / pacify the legions of followers who attend my words throughout the globe, (about 3 people or less). Let?s forget the bad stuff that every country produces and rather we will recall some of ...

    Warning: If you've experienced melancholia or been diagnosed with depression, reading this novel may be inadvisable. <3.7 stars> "A cynic can chill and dishearten with a single word." Ralph Waldo Emerson From Journey to the End of the Night: The sadness of the world has d...

    Hilarious, scathing and-oh-so-very-bitter, Journey to the End of the Night is a beautifully written - and translated - paean to misanthropy and the general crumminess of man. The novel comprises the journeys of Cline's alter-ego, Ferdinand Bardemu, from a frightened and bewildered so...

    Finally, after a busy week, I have finished my journey to the end of this book. Savage, brutal, disgusting, repulsive, and misanthropic are not necessarily adjectives I would use to describe a masterpiece, but with Celine, they're all meant as compliments. Is it the most pessimisti...

    ? This is where I drew the line when I was studying French litterature in Uni. Years after, I still can't do it. Fuck you, Louis-Ferdinand. All your writing style just can't redeem your racist, mysogynist ramblings. One might say this is fiction. This is NOT. Not when the same au...

    Originally, I thought about writing an eloquent review of this book, but intentions do not always come to bear fruit. The longer I think about it, the less apt I am to do it, so, instead of procrastinating, I'm just going to 'wing it' live on GR. Here it goes. I first borrowed ...

    ?Misery is like some horrible woman you?ve married. Maybe it?s better to end up loving her a little than to knock yourself out beating her all your life. Since obviously you won?t be able to bump her off.? Overall, Journey to the End of the Night was a very well-written, ...

    The depth and honesty of this book I think, are often misunderstood as being purely cynical, and depressing. Celine sees the complexities of humanity and gives it to you straight.The truth is an ugly thing to face, but there is beauty here too, not only in the prose, but also in the li...

    There is an afterword by William Vollmann in the book (which incidentally starts with "Reader, fuck you!...You think I give a shit whether or not you've read this book? Or that Cline's ghost does? That would be the day!") which I found to be very cool. He asks, Why is Cline a great...

    I think I got a case of retroactive clich with this one. I bet this was the classic that spawned the slowly populating genre of ?Guy eats lovely food in a restaurant with a friend he hates and rants about life?s meaninglessness? that was later contributed to by such legends ...

  • Autoclette
    Nov 21, 2015

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

    Journey to the End of the Night was not what I expected. Based on the cover art and description, I had prepared myself for a grim and sombre voyage to the depths of human depravity. Maybe the book simply hasn't aged well, but I thought it was really quite tame - not at all the "literar...

    We will not consider the personal politics or prejudices of this author, if only to quell / pacify the legions of followers who attend my words throughout the globe, (about 3 people or less). Let?s forget the bad stuff that every country produces and rather we will recall some of ...

    Warning: If you've experienced melancholia or been diagnosed with depression, reading this novel may be inadvisable. <3.7 stars> "A cynic can chill and dishearten with a single word." Ralph Waldo Emerson From Journey to the End of the Night: The sadness of the world has d...

    Hilarious, scathing and-oh-so-very-bitter, Journey to the End of the Night is a beautifully written - and translated - paean to misanthropy and the general crumminess of man. The novel comprises the journeys of Cline's alter-ego, Ferdinand Bardemu, from a frightened and bewildered so...

    Finally, after a busy week, I have finished my journey to the end of this book. Savage, brutal, disgusting, repulsive, and misanthropic are not necessarily adjectives I would use to describe a masterpiece, but with Celine, they're all meant as compliments. Is it the most pessimisti...

    ? This is where I drew the line when I was studying French litterature in Uni. Years after, I still can't do it. Fuck you, Louis-Ferdinand. All your writing style just can't redeem your racist, mysogynist ramblings. One might say this is fiction. This is NOT. Not when the same au...

    Originally, I thought about writing an eloquent review of this book, but intentions do not always come to bear fruit. The longer I think about it, the less apt I am to do it, so, instead of procrastinating, I'm just going to 'wing it' live on GR. Here it goes. I first borrowed ...

    ?Misery is like some horrible woman you?ve married. Maybe it?s better to end up loving her a little than to knock yourself out beating her all your life. Since obviously you won?t be able to bump her off.? Overall, Journey to the End of the Night was a very well-written, ...

    The depth and honesty of this book I think, are often misunderstood as being purely cynical, and depressing. Celine sees the complexities of humanity and gives it to you straight.The truth is an ugly thing to face, but there is beauty here too, not only in the prose, but also in the li...

  • Edward
    Nov 28, 2016

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

    Journey to the End of the Night was not what I expected. Based on the cover art and description, I had prepared myself for a grim and sombre voyage to the depths of human depravity. Maybe the book simply hasn't aged well, but I thought it was really quite tame - not at all the "literar...

  • Henry Martin
    Nov 19, 2012

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

    Journey to the End of the Night was not what I expected. Based on the cover art and description, I had prepared myself for a grim and sombre voyage to the depths of human depravity. Maybe the book simply hasn't aged well, but I thought it was really quite tame - not at all the "literar...

    We will not consider the personal politics or prejudices of this author, if only to quell / pacify the legions of followers who attend my words throughout the globe, (about 3 people or less). Let?s forget the bad stuff that every country produces and rather we will recall some of ...

    Warning: If you've experienced melancholia or been diagnosed with depression, reading this novel may be inadvisable. <3.7 stars> "A cynic can chill and dishearten with a single word." Ralph Waldo Emerson From Journey to the End of the Night: The sadness of the world has d...

    Hilarious, scathing and-oh-so-very-bitter, Journey to the End of the Night is a beautifully written - and translated - paean to misanthropy and the general crumminess of man. The novel comprises the journeys of Cline's alter-ego, Ferdinand Bardemu, from a frightened and bewildered so...

    Finally, after a busy week, I have finished my journey to the end of this book. Savage, brutal, disgusting, repulsive, and misanthropic are not necessarily adjectives I would use to describe a masterpiece, but with Celine, they're all meant as compliments. Is it the most pessimisti...

    ? This is where I drew the line when I was studying French litterature in Uni. Years after, I still can't do it. Fuck you, Louis-Ferdinand. All your writing style just can't redeem your racist, mysogynist ramblings. One might say this is fiction. This is NOT. Not when the same au...

    Originally, I thought about writing an eloquent review of this book, but intentions do not always come to bear fruit. The longer I think about it, the less apt I am to do it, so, instead of procrastinating, I'm just going to 'wing it' live on GR. Here it goes. I first borrowed ...

  • Vit Babenco
    Apr 14, 2013

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

  • Stian
    Jul 08, 2013

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

    Journey to the End of the Night was not what I expected. Based on the cover art and description, I had prepared myself for a grim and sombre voyage to the depths of human depravity. Maybe the book simply hasn't aged well, but I thought it was really quite tame - not at all the "literar...

    We will not consider the personal politics or prejudices of this author, if only to quell / pacify the legions of followers who attend my words throughout the globe, (about 3 people or less). Let?s forget the bad stuff that every country produces and rather we will recall some of ...

    Warning: If you've experienced melancholia or been diagnosed with depression, reading this novel may be inadvisable. <3.7 stars> "A cynic can chill and dishearten with a single word." Ralph Waldo Emerson From Journey to the End of the Night: The sadness of the world has d...

    Hilarious, scathing and-oh-so-very-bitter, Journey to the End of the Night is a beautifully written - and translated - paean to misanthropy and the general crumminess of man. The novel comprises the journeys of Cline's alter-ego, Ferdinand Bardemu, from a frightened and bewildered so...

    Finally, after a busy week, I have finished my journey to the end of this book. Savage, brutal, disgusting, repulsive, and misanthropic are not necessarily adjectives I would use to describe a masterpiece, but with Celine, they're all meant as compliments. Is it the most pessimisti...

    ? This is where I drew the line when I was studying French litterature in Uni. Years after, I still can't do it. Fuck you, Louis-Ferdinand. All your writing style just can't redeem your racist, mysogynist ramblings. One might say this is fiction. This is NOT. Not when the same au...

    Originally, I thought about writing an eloquent review of this book, but intentions do not always come to bear fruit. The longer I think about it, the less apt I am to do it, so, instead of procrastinating, I'm just going to 'wing it' live on GR. Here it goes. I first borrowed ...

    ?Misery is like some horrible woman you?ve married. Maybe it?s better to end up loving her a little than to knock yourself out beating her all your life. Since obviously you won?t be able to bump her off.? Overall, Journey to the End of the Night was a very well-written, ...

    The depth and honesty of this book I think, are often misunderstood as being purely cynical, and depressing. Celine sees the complexities of humanity and gives it to you straight.The truth is an ugly thing to face, but there is beauty here too, not only in the prose, but also in the li...

    There is an afterword by William Vollmann in the book (which incidentally starts with "Reader, fuck you!...You think I give a shit whether or not you've read this book? Or that Cline's ghost does? That would be the day!") which I found to be very cool. He asks, Why is Cline a great...

  • Steven Godin
    Jun 28, 2016

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

  • Alienor ✘ French Frowner ✘
    Apr 05, 2015

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

    Journey to the End of the Night was not what I expected. Based on the cover art and description, I had prepared myself for a grim and sombre voyage to the depths of human depravity. Maybe the book simply hasn't aged well, but I thought it was really quite tame - not at all the "literar...

    We will not consider the personal politics or prejudices of this author, if only to quell / pacify the legions of followers who attend my words throughout the globe, (about 3 people or less). Let?s forget the bad stuff that every country produces and rather we will recall some of ...

    Warning: If you've experienced melancholia or been diagnosed with depression, reading this novel may be inadvisable. <3.7 stars> "A cynic can chill and dishearten with a single word." Ralph Waldo Emerson From Journey to the End of the Night: The sadness of the world has d...

    Hilarious, scathing and-oh-so-very-bitter, Journey to the End of the Night is a beautifully written - and translated - paean to misanthropy and the general crumminess of man. The novel comprises the journeys of Cline's alter-ego, Ferdinand Bardemu, from a frightened and bewildered so...

    Finally, after a busy week, I have finished my journey to the end of this book. Savage, brutal, disgusting, repulsive, and misanthropic are not necessarily adjectives I would use to describe a masterpiece, but with Celine, they're all meant as compliments. Is it the most pessimisti...

    ? This is where I drew the line when I was studying French litterature in Uni. Years after, I still can't do it. Fuck you, Louis-Ferdinand. All your writing style just can't redeem your racist, mysogynist ramblings. One might say this is fiction. This is NOT. Not when the same au...

  • Chris_P
    Apr 26, 2016

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

  • Michael Finocchiaro
    Oct 11, 2016

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

  • Sidharth Vardhan
    Dec 04, 2014

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

  • david
    May 15, 2017

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

    Journey to the End of the Night was not what I expected. Based on the cover art and description, I had prepared myself for a grim and sombre voyage to the depths of human depravity. Maybe the book simply hasn't aged well, but I thought it was really quite tame - not at all the "literar...

    We will not consider the personal politics or prejudices of this author, if only to quell / pacify the legions of followers who attend my words throughout the globe, (about 3 people or less). Let?s forget the bad stuff that every country produces and rather we will recall some of ...

  • İntellecta
    Dec 03, 2018

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

  • Tara
    Aug 22, 2017

    Whoa. Just finished, processing, mulling, wondering?what do I say? How do you prepare someone? Should someone be prepared (I wasn?t)? Imagine the most depressing story you?ve ever read (and I?ve read ALL of McCarthy), narrated by the angriest of narrators (who may mellow, then ...

    ?Not much music left inside us for life to dance to. Our youth has gone to the ends of the earth to die in the silence of the truth. And where, I ask you, can a man escape to, when he hasn't enough madness left inside him? The truth is an endless death agony. The truth is death. You ...

    648. Voyage au bout de la nuit = Journey to The End of The Night, Louis-Ferdinand Cline Journey to the End of the Night (Voyage au bout de la nuit, 1932) is the first novel by Louis-Ferdinand Cline. This semi-autobiographical work describes antihero Ferdinand Bardamu. Bardamu is i...

    Journey to the End of the Night "tells about the life of medical students". Ferdinand Bardamu, from the First World War on bush stories in the deepest Africa and a galley trip to America until the return to France as a poor doctor. The novel carries mainly autobiographical features. ...

    From the muddy battlegrounds of the great war and the sweltering infested jungles of French colonial Africa, to his discovery of america where he takes a job in an industrial Detroit and his return to the suburbs of Paris to work as a doctor before finally taking employment in a mental...

    Apparently, for a week or so in June 1997 I either lost my sense of humor or felt some kind of glow of optimism that made me feel the misanthropic subject of this book was boring. My principle memories of reading this for the first time were a) being bored and b) buying a bunch of The ...

    just finished reading it and it really feels like it might be the central book of the entire 20th century. i see catch-22 and henry miller and william burroughs and kerouac and sartre and beckett and bukowski and vonnegut and hunter s. thompson and bret easton ellis and about a million...

    Celine?s Journey to the End of Night is a towering achievement in literary observation through a narrator incapable of self-delusion and a less than stringent filter between his thoughts and his audience. Plus, it?s funny as hell. The novel reads as the author?s travelogue thr...

    Preface to the 1952 Gallimard Edition --Journey to the End of the Night Glossary Afterword, by William T. Vollmann ...

    Fifteen years of sitting on my bookshelves and I finally get around to reading it. This is a little bit sad, because I would have loved this book fifteen years ago, when I believed bitter misanthropy and self-indulgent misery were the only true lenses through which humanity should be v...

    Our Journey... "To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength." Celine's first novel begins with the words, "Here's how it started" and finishes "...and that would be the e...

    Cline was a pretty unsavory human being. An anti-Semite, a misogynist, pretty much full of hate all around. And yet, a fucking amazing writer. His French is both beautiful and vulgar, heart-rending and repulsive, full of interesting characters and yet completely alone. Voyage au bout...

    ?The sunsets in that African hell proved to be fabulous. They never missed. As tragic every time as a monumental murder of the sun! But the marvel was too great for one man alone. For a whole hour the sky paraded in great delirious spurts of scarlet from end to end; after that the gr...

    A full-on misanthropic epic, like if E.M. Cioran met Thom Yorke for a fly pie in a Nigerian slum. Cline is a deliberately choppy, lawless stylist, Dostoevskian in his fondness for the nerve-racked ellipsis and the hysterical exclamation point (tics that would characterise his later, ...

    A long, beautiful, hilarious, vile, cynical rant about everything and everyone. Bile drips from every page. The author-surrogate travels from Paris to the hellscape of the first world war to the dank oppressive heat of a colonial jungle, and the gleaming lonely crowds of New York an...

    This is undoubtedly one of the great novels. It is misanthropic in the extreme; the author really doesn?t like anyone, including himself. Often written in the vernacular, brutal, comic and ranging over three continents and a World War. There is a strong element of the autobiographica...

    All you who are reading these very lines right now, are waiting for a review, an analysis maybe of Journey to the End of the Night, I bet. Well, I regret to say that I'll most probably disappoint you. In fact -and I don't mean to talk down the admittedly great job some reviewers have d...

    ?The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time.? "When you start hiding from people, it's a sign that you're afraid to play with them. That in itself is a disease. We should try to find out why we refuse to get cu...

    Journey to the End of the Night was not what I expected. Based on the cover art and description, I had prepared myself for a grim and sombre voyage to the depths of human depravity. Maybe the book simply hasn't aged well, but I thought it was really quite tame - not at all the "literar...

    We will not consider the personal politics or prejudices of this author, if only to quell / pacify the legions of followers who attend my words throughout the globe, (about 3 people or less). Let?s forget the bad stuff that every country produces and rather we will recall some of ...

    Warning: If you've experienced melancholia or been diagnosed with depression, reading this novel may be inadvisable. <3.7 stars> "A cynic can chill and dishearten with a single word." Ralph Waldo Emerson From Journey to the End of the Night: The sadness of the world has d...

    Hilarious, scathing and-oh-so-very-bitter, Journey to the End of the Night is a beautifully written - and translated - paean to misanthropy and the general crumminess of man. The novel comprises the journeys of Cline's alter-ego, Ferdinand Bardemu, from a frightened and bewildered so...

    Finally, after a busy week, I have finished my journey to the end of this book. Savage, brutal, disgusting, repulsive, and misanthropic are not necessarily adjectives I would use to describe a masterpiece, but with Celine, they're all meant as compliments. Is it the most pessimisti...

    ? This is where I drew the line when I was studying French litterature in Uni. Years after, I still can't do it. Fuck you, Louis-Ferdinand. All your writing style just can't redeem your racist, mysogynist ramblings. One might say this is fiction. This is NOT. Not when the same au...

    Originally, I thought about writing an eloquent review of this book, but intentions do not always come to bear fruit. The longer I think about it, the less apt I am to do it, so, instead of procrastinating, I'm just going to 'wing it' live on GR. Here it goes. I first borrowed ...

    ?Misery is like some horrible woman you?ve married. Maybe it?s better to end up loving her a little than to knock yourself out beating her all your life. Since obviously you won?t be able to bump her off.? Overall, Journey to the End of the Night was a very well-written, ...