The Big Book of Hacks: 264 Amazing DIY Tech Projects

The Big Book of Hacks: 264 Amazing DIY Tech Projects

Fire up your soldering iron, charge up that drill, and get ready to hack! From a tiny theremin to a watermelon keg, from an automatic cat feeder to a glowing mousepad, the ingenious and hilarious projects in The Big Book of Hacks are perfect for aspiring makers. And it's all brought to you by the DIY masters at Popular Science magazine. Four comprehensive chapters help you Fire up your soldering iron, charge up that drill, and get ready to hack! From a tiny theremin to a watermelon keg, fr...

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Title:The Big Book of Hacks: 264 Amazing DIY Tech Projects
Author:Doug Cantor
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:1616283998
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:256 pages pages

The Big Book of Hacks: 264 Amazing DIY Tech Projects Reviews

  • Melody
    Jul 06, 2013

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

  • Wendy
    Jul 06, 2013

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

  • Michael Prier
    Nov 14, 2013

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

  • Jason
    Aug 21, 2014

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Doris
    Jan 09, 2015

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

  • Jennifer Rummel
    Nov 25, 2014

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

  • Sherrill
    Jul 23, 2014

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

  • Kim
    Sep 25, 2012

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

  • Vi
    Jan 02, 2013

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

  • Jon
    Sep 20, 2014

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

  • Matt Jones
    Jul 11, 2014

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

  • Caroline
    Jul 07, 2014

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • John
    Sep 30, 2014

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Natacha Pavlov
    Sep 28, 2012

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

  • Marcy Graybill
    Jan 27, 2013

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

  • Carrol
    Feb 08, 2013

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

  • Shelly
    Sep 24, 2012

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

  • Zinou
    Nov 25, 2012

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

  • Cristina
    Nov 08, 2015

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Delaine Worrell
    Feb 13, 2013

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • William Schram
    Aug 19, 2019

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

  • JD Reed
    Nov 08, 2017

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • LAPL Reads
    Jan 29, 2014

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

  • Scott Daniels
    May 22, 2014

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Lisa Watanabe
    Jul 21, 2014

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Dago
    Aug 04, 2014

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Matthew C Warrington
    Oct 01, 2015

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

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  • Jorge
    Dec 12, 2015

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Sarah
    Jul 04, 2016

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Matt trowbridge
    May 19, 2019

    Wood, Metal, Wiring, Microcontrollers; these are the ingredients used to make the perfect DIY project. However, you aren?t going to make a robotic bartender with just these things, you also need knowledge and a good grasp of tools. That?s where this book comes in. It clues you in o...

    This book is great for people who enjoy hands-on work and like to hack?aka take apart and re-use objects in new ways. There are 264 projects for rookie and seasoned hackers split into 4 categories: geek toys, home improvements, gadget upgrades and things that go. Some of the simp...

    This has some interesting projects--I was especially interested in the ones for converting things to alternative energy sources, and the ways you can use parts of dead computers for other stuff--though a lot of them seemed kind of silly to me. But making things is always cool, and even...

    There are lots of projects in this book ranging from the moronic (toenail clipper catapult?) to the downright dangerous (flame tornado?), very few of which inspired me to action. The ones that almost inspired me to act were eventually cast aside after asking the question "is this usefu...

    Much can be written about the popularity and permeation of DIY (do-it-yourself) culture into our everyday lives. The emphasis on self-sufficiency and learning to do things without paying someone, or relying on an expert, has encouraged many to become modern-day homemakers and handypers...

    I wanted to do about 90% of the projects in this book. Sadly, only about 30% of them fall within my current skill level. Even if you don't know which end of the screwdriver to hold, this is an engaging and interesting book. The photographs are clear and informative, the instructions mo...

    The title of this book is misleading for those who equate "hacks" with electronic devices. Yet there are still some interesting, though not always useful, projects in the book. I, for one, do not find lawn mowing so odious that I would attach my mower to a rebar pole in the middle of t...

    From 5 minute projects requiring little skill to seriously challenging projects that require multiple settings to accomplish, this book offers a wide range of options. While some projects seem silly (shower beer caddy), and others seem dangerous (hold a flaming ball in your hand), othe...

    Disclaimer: I don't have a DIY cell in my body. With that said, I love this book! So much fun! Kept it out of library so long I'm beginning to feel guilty. It's even witty! Really should be a 4.5. There is something for everyone. Yes, even I could successfully complete a project. Examp...

    Mix of easy and hard projects - some great for library programs and others are bit older. Looking forward to testing out some ideas with teens next year. ...

    A fantastic book that is lavishly illustrated with appeal to browsing. The explanations can be a bit light, but the variety of projects at different price points and technical skill level is a plus. ...

    Though not a book you really sit down and read, it was fun to thumb through and see all the ideas. I actually found a couple I wanted to try. ...

    There were some really cool ideas, but as a book on a high school reading library, it does not belong. Too many alcohol references or "how to's" for alcohol. ...

    Useful ...

    Not what I was expecting. but some good ideas. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

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    ...

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