The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study

The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study

In this series of essays Fred Moten and Stefano Harney draw on the theory and practice of the black radical tradition as it supports, inspires, and extends contemporary social and political thought and aesthetic critique. Today the general wealth of social life finds itself confronted by mutations in the mechanisms of control, from the proliferation of capitalist logistics In this series of essays Fred Moten and Stefano Harney draw on the theory and practice of the black radical tradition as ...

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Title:The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study
Author:Fred Moten
Rating:
Genres:Philosophy
ISBN:1570272670
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:166 pages pages

The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study Reviews

  • janet
    May 21, 2019

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

  • Andrew Bertaina
    Jun 15, 2018

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

  • Carrie
    Mar 24, 2014

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

  • Ying
    May 15, 2015

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

  • Patricia
    Jan 14, 2014

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

    This was an incredibly quick and easy read, but it was packed with multiple great thoughts, and it is something I definitely see myself coming back to. ...

    Brilliant book, it was a second read and I will come back to this book over time. I especially liked Debt and Study ...

    The chapter on policy syncs up so nicely with Sara Ahmed's On Being Included, not to mention the rest of the book is here for a revolution in some really necessary ways. ...

    In the clear, critical light of day, illusory administrators whisper of our need for institutions, and all institutions are political, and all politics is correctional, so it seems we need correctional institutions in the common, settling it, correcting us. But we won't stand corrected...

    "What's totally interesting to me is to just not call the class to order. ... You're basically saying, let's just see what happens if I don't make that geture of calling the class to order. ... Instead of announcing that class has begun, just acknowledge that class began." One of my ...

    Truly one of the most difficult books I've ever had the pleasure of wading through. Stylistically pretty par for the course as far as Moten goes (not familiar with Harney beyond this book), which is to say, breathtakingly and at times infuriatingly poetic, recursive, and playful. I'd s...

    This book was really uneven for me. 3 stars for the Jack Halberstam intro, basically a nicely written reiteration of points JH has made elsewhere. 5 stars for the interview with Moten and Harney at the end, which lays out some incredibly interesting ideas about community and labor in a...

  • Steven
    Jun 09, 2019

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

  • Jacob Wren
    Mar 15, 2015

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

  • jess
    Jul 19, 2017

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

  • Dandi
    Jan 13, 2016

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

    This was an incredibly quick and easy read, but it was packed with multiple great thoughts, and it is something I definitely see myself coming back to. ...

    Brilliant book, it was a second read and I will come back to this book over time. I especially liked Debt and Study ...

    The chapter on policy syncs up so nicely with Sara Ahmed's On Being Included, not to mention the rest of the book is here for a revolution in some really necessary ways. ...

    In the clear, critical light of day, illusory administrators whisper of our need for institutions, and all institutions are political, and all politics is correctional, so it seems we need correctional institutions in the common, settling it, correcting us. But we won't stand corrected...

    "What's totally interesting to me is to just not call the class to order. ... You're basically saying, let's just see what happens if I don't make that geture of calling the class to order. ... Instead of announcing that class has begun, just acknowledge that class began." One of my ...

    Truly one of the most difficult books I've ever had the pleasure of wading through. Stylistically pretty par for the course as far as Moten goes (not familiar with Harney beyond this book), which is to say, breathtakingly and at times infuriatingly poetic, recursive, and playful. I'd s...

  • Bookshark
    May 30, 2018

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

  • Victoria Durden
    Jun 08, 2014

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

    This was an incredibly quick and easy read, but it was packed with multiple great thoughts, and it is something I definitely see myself coming back to. ...

    Brilliant book, it was a second read and I will come back to this book over time. I especially liked Debt and Study ...

    The chapter on policy syncs up so nicely with Sara Ahmed's On Being Included, not to mention the rest of the book is here for a revolution in some really necessary ways. ...

    In the clear, critical light of day, illusory administrators whisper of our need for institutions, and all institutions are political, and all politics is correctional, so it seems we need correctional institutions in the common, settling it, correcting us. But we won't stand corrected...

    "What's totally interesting to me is to just not call the class to order. ... You're basically saying, let's just see what happens if I don't make that geture of calling the class to order. ... Instead of announcing that class has begun, just acknowledge that class began." One of my ...

    Truly one of the most difficult books I've ever had the pleasure of wading through. Stylistically pretty par for the course as far as Moten goes (not familiar with Harney beyond this book), which is to say, breathtakingly and at times infuriatingly poetic, recursive, and playful. I'd s...

    This book was really uneven for me. 3 stars for the Jack Halberstam intro, basically a nicely written reiteration of points JH has made elsewhere. 5 stars for the interview with Moten and Harney at the end, which lays out some incredibly interesting ideas about community and labor in a...

    necessary reading for anyone who studies critical theory. ...

  • ralowe
    Feb 25, 2013

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

  • Kate Klein
    Dec 28, 2018

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

  • M.L. Rio
    Dec 05, 2017

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

  • Nathaniel
    Mar 11, 2017

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

  • Alfredo Bojórquez
    Mar 22, 2019

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

  • Muthee BM
    Apr 24, 2018

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

    This was an incredibly quick and easy read, but it was packed with multiple great thoughts, and it is something I definitely see myself coming back to. ...

    Brilliant book, it was a second read and I will come back to this book over time. I especially liked Debt and Study ...

  • Karen
    Mar 16, 2016

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

    This was an incredibly quick and easy read, but it was packed with multiple great thoughts, and it is something I definitely see myself coming back to. ...

    Brilliant book, it was a second read and I will come back to this book over time. I especially liked Debt and Study ...

    The chapter on policy syncs up so nicely with Sara Ahmed's On Being Included, not to mention the rest of the book is here for a revolution in some really necessary ways. ...

    In the clear, critical light of day, illusory administrators whisper of our need for institutions, and all institutions are political, and all politics is correctional, so it seems we need correctional institutions in the common, settling it, correcting us. But we won't stand corrected...

    "What's totally interesting to me is to just not call the class to order. ... You're basically saying, let's just see what happens if I don't make that geture of calling the class to order. ... Instead of announcing that class has begun, just acknowledge that class began." One of my ...

    Truly one of the most difficult books I've ever had the pleasure of wading through. Stylistically pretty par for the course as far as Moten goes (not familiar with Harney beyond this book), which is to say, breathtakingly and at times infuriatingly poetic, recursive, and playful. I'd s...

    This book was really uneven for me. 3 stars for the Jack Halberstam intro, basically a nicely written reiteration of points JH has made elsewhere. 5 stars for the interview with Moten and Harney at the end, which lays out some incredibly interesting ideas about community and labor in a...

    necessary reading for anyone who studies critical theory. ...

    Lots to ponder. My favourite sections deal more with the notions of being with and for. A timely intervention and conversation starter for a variety of fields/subjects. ...

  • Razi Shaikh
    Sep 03, 2018

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

  • Griffin Alexander
    Oct 01, 2015

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

    This was an incredibly quick and easy read, but it was packed with multiple great thoughts, and it is something I definitely see myself coming back to. ...

    Brilliant book, it was a second read and I will come back to this book over time. I especially liked Debt and Study ...

    The chapter on policy syncs up so nicely with Sara Ahmed's On Being Included, not to mention the rest of the book is here for a revolution in some really necessary ways. ...

    In the clear, critical light of day, illusory administrators whisper of our need for institutions, and all institutions are political, and all politics is correctional, so it seems we need correctional institutions in the common, settling it, correcting us. But we won't stand corrected...

  • Quinn
    Aug 16, 2014

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

    This was an incredibly quick and easy read, but it was packed with multiple great thoughts, and it is something I definitely see myself coming back to. ...

    Brilliant book, it was a second read and I will come back to this book over time. I especially liked Debt and Study ...

    The chapter on policy syncs up so nicely with Sara Ahmed's On Being Included, not to mention the rest of the book is here for a revolution in some really necessary ways. ...

    In the clear, critical light of day, illusory administrators whisper of our need for institutions, and all institutions are political, and all politics is correctional, so it seems we need correctional institutions in the common, settling it, correcting us. But we won't stand corrected...

    "What's totally interesting to me is to just not call the class to order. ... You're basically saying, let's just see what happens if I don't make that geture of calling the class to order. ... Instead of announcing that class has begun, just acknowledge that class began." One of my ...

    Truly one of the most difficult books I've ever had the pleasure of wading through. Stylistically pretty par for the course as far as Moten goes (not familiar with Harney beyond this book), which is to say, breathtakingly and at times infuriatingly poetic, recursive, and playful. I'd s...

    This book was really uneven for me. 3 stars for the Jack Halberstam intro, basically a nicely written reiteration of points JH has made elsewhere. 5 stars for the interview with Moten and Harney at the end, which lays out some incredibly interesting ideas about community and labor in a...

    necessary reading for anyone who studies critical theory. ...

    Lots to ponder. My favourite sections deal more with the notions of being with and for. A timely intervention and conversation starter for a variety of fields/subjects. ...

    ...

    ...

  • Travis Wagner
    Apr 13, 2018

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

    This was an incredibly quick and easy read, but it was packed with multiple great thoughts, and it is something I definitely see myself coming back to. ...

    Brilliant book, it was a second read and I will come back to this book over time. I especially liked Debt and Study ...

    The chapter on policy syncs up so nicely with Sara Ahmed's On Being Included, not to mention the rest of the book is here for a revolution in some really necessary ways. ...

  • Misty
    Oct 22, 2017

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

    This was an incredibly quick and easy read, but it was packed with multiple great thoughts, and it is something I definitely see myself coming back to. ...

  • Maren
    Apr 17, 2016

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

    This was an incredibly quick and easy read, but it was packed with multiple great thoughts, and it is something I definitely see myself coming back to. ...

    Brilliant book, it was a second read and I will come back to this book over time. I especially liked Debt and Study ...

    The chapter on policy syncs up so nicely with Sara Ahmed's On Being Included, not to mention the rest of the book is here for a revolution in some really necessary ways. ...

    In the clear, critical light of day, illusory administrators whisper of our need for institutions, and all institutions are political, and all politics is correctional, so it seems we need correctional institutions in the common, settling it, correcting us. But we won't stand corrected...

    "What's totally interesting to me is to just not call the class to order. ... You're basically saying, let's just see what happens if I don't make that geture of calling the class to order. ... Instead of announcing that class has begun, just acknowledge that class began." One of my ...

  • Charlie Kruse
    Mar 05, 2018

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

  • Erica
    Sep 04, 2018

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

  • Rue
    Jul 09, 2017

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

    This was an incredibly quick and easy read, but it was packed with multiple great thoughts, and it is something I definitely see myself coming back to. ...

    Brilliant book, it was a second read and I will come back to this book over time. I especially liked Debt and Study ...

    The chapter on policy syncs up so nicely with Sara Ahmed's On Being Included, not to mention the rest of the book is here for a revolution in some really necessary ways. ...

    In the clear, critical light of day, illusory administrators whisper of our need for institutions, and all institutions are political, and all politics is correctional, so it seems we need correctional institutions in the common, settling it, correcting us. But we won't stand corrected...

    "What's totally interesting to me is to just not call the class to order. ... You're basically saying, let's just see what happens if I don't make that geture of calling the class to order. ... Instead of announcing that class has begun, just acknowledge that class began." One of my ...

    Truly one of the most difficult books I've ever had the pleasure of wading through. Stylistically pretty par for the course as far as Moten goes (not familiar with Harney beyond this book), which is to say, breathtakingly and at times infuriatingly poetic, recursive, and playful. I'd s...

    This book was really uneven for me. 3 stars for the Jack Halberstam intro, basically a nicely written reiteration of points JH has made elsewhere. 5 stars for the interview with Moten and Harney at the end, which lays out some incredibly interesting ideas about community and labor in a...

    necessary reading for anyone who studies critical theory. ...

    Lots to ponder. My favourite sections deal more with the notions of being with and for. A timely intervention and conversation starter for a variety of fields/subjects. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Jay Hanmer
    May 20, 2018

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

  • Kristine
    Apr 01, 2019

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

  • Jake Rademacher
    Dec 07, 2018

    A few lines from The Undercommons: Critique lets us know that politics is radioactive, but politics is the radiation of critique. We run looking for a weapon and keep running looking to drop it. What are the politics of being ready to die and what have they to do with t...

    ?There is this particular labor process model [in the university] that?s being exported, that?s being generalized in so-called creative industries and other places, and which is deployed expertly against study.? I noticed this at SF State -- all the students doing projects ...

    This is one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time. It spoke to me. I felt invited into their collaborative project; I felt as if I am already a part of something I did not know I was doing. Their call is towards something that is only faintly sketched, not quite visible y...

    i feel like i had placed my self under advisement to read this book right away for about a year before i actually did. maybe it was two years. i should be ashamed of myself. i had the digital download but this is the kind of book you have to feel in the world with the paper and i lucke...

    This is an object lesson in everything that's wrong with theory. Harney and Moten's ideas might be great, but nobody will ever know because they're buried under a landslide of critical jargon and tautological bullshit. If I never have to read anything this willfully impenetrable ever a...

    DNF. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the most painful and frustrating readings I've ever come across in academia. Paragraphs upon paragraphs of impenetrable, vague, and (IMHO) unnecessary additions that completely obfuscate the actual points being made. The authors are frustrati...

    TBH a good chunk of this initially went over my head (it?s been a while since I?ve read dense theory), but I did get a lot out of it... and then I read the fascinating and utterly endearing interview between Harney and Moten and a third guy at the end and that made me want to read ...

    Un libro demasiado complejo, es como el free jazz pero en escritura. ...

    "Instead our fantasies must come from what Moten and Harney citing Frank B. Wilderson III call 'the hold': 'And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.' The hold here is the hold in the s...

    wanna think abt how moten's call to disorder suggests a more radical project/relation to each other than what scot nakagawa uses harmony to describe here https://www.racefiles.com/2015/08/21/... ...

    ????????? upon second reading, found it more lacking but understood it more ...

    ?Never being on the right side of the Atlantic is an unsettled feeling, the feeling of a thing that unsettles with others. It?s a feeling, if you ride with it, that produces a certain distance from the settled, from those who determine themselves in space and time, who locate thems...

    Right now I can't explain why I love this book so much, but I can see that so many people feel the same way. The book is free. Just read it and see what resonances and openings you get from it. Not all of it will make sense, but that's OK. Note their uses of words that don't quite make...

    Incredible... opaque.... this book opens the door to reassessment of the our world in every sense, the social with the material, the performative and the authoritative, the non individualised... I feel so strongly for this book I cannot express myself. To read again and again ...

    It's a difficult text. In part, it's difficult because of the theoretical and philosophical language that sometimes goes undefined. That said, it's also difficult because it proposes new ways at looking at our relationship to the university, capitalism, and planning vs. policy. ...

    This book is such a clear articulation of leftist movements that have come into focus since 2013 that it almost seems impossible. ...

    tbh though parts of it are borderline unreadable ...

    The second chapter raises excellent critiques of academia, but the language in later chapters becomes so vague as to be incomprehensible. Concision, lucidity and accessibility are lacking entirely. ...

    This was an incredibly quick and easy read, but it was packed with multiple great thoughts, and it is something I definitely see myself coming back to. ...

    Brilliant book, it was a second read and I will come back to this book over time. I especially liked Debt and Study ...

    The chapter on policy syncs up so nicely with Sara Ahmed's On Being Included, not to mention the rest of the book is here for a revolution in some really necessary ways. ...

    In the clear, critical light of day, illusory administrators whisper of our need for institutions, and all institutions are political, and all politics is correctional, so it seems we need correctional institutions in the common, settling it, correcting us. But we won't stand corrected...

    "What's totally interesting to me is to just not call the class to order. ... You're basically saying, let's just see what happens if I don't make that geture of calling the class to order. ... Instead of announcing that class has begun, just acknowledge that class began." One of my ...

    Truly one of the most difficult books I've ever had the pleasure of wading through. Stylistically pretty par for the course as far as Moten goes (not familiar with Harney beyond this book), which is to say, breathtakingly and at times infuriatingly poetic, recursive, and playful. I'd s...

    This book was really uneven for me. 3 stars for the Jack Halberstam intro, basically a nicely written reiteration of points JH has made elsewhere. 5 stars for the interview with Moten and Harney at the end, which lays out some incredibly interesting ideas about community and labor in a...

    necessary reading for anyone who studies critical theory. ...

    Lots to ponder. My favourite sections deal more with the notions of being with and for. A timely intervention and conversation starter for a variety of fields/subjects. ...

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