A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities

'Liberty, equality, fraternity, or death; -- the last, much the easiest to bestow, O Guillotine!' After eighteen years as a political prisoner in the Bastille, the ageing Doctor Manette is finally released and reunited with his daughter in England. There the lives of two very different men, Charles Darnay, an exiled French aristocrat, and Sydney Carton, a disreputable but...

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Title:A Tale of Two Cities
Author:Charles Dickens
Rating:
ISBN:0141439602
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:489 pages

A Tale of Two Cities Reviews

  • Melissa Rudder
    Jan 23, 2008
    My primary goal when I'm teaching A Tale of Two Cities to my sophomores is to make them realize that Charles Dickens didn't write creaky, dusty long novels that teachers embraced as a twisted rite of passage for teenagers. Instead, I want them them to understand why Dickens was one of the most popul...
  • Leslie
    Feb 09, 2008
    Most satisfying ending in the English language. Yes, the last line is a classic ("It is a far, far better thing ..."), concluding, in astonishingly concise language (for Dickens), the peace and redemption of the story's most poignant romantic hero. But this novel delivers such a gratifying experienc...
  • Laura
    Jun 12, 2008
    Years of teaching this novel to teenagers never dimmed my thrill in reading it — if anything, I grew to love it more every time I watched kids gasp aloud at the revelations! Critics are divided on its place in the Dickens canon, but the ones who think it an inferior work are simply deranged. It...
  • Jason Koivu
    Nov 22, 2008
    Hands down my favorite Dickens' I've read yet! It's got love, sacrifice, revenge, revolt and other exciting verbs! I'm a big fan of a solid marriage between character development and action. A Tale of Two Cities is well-wed. Some criticize Dickens for his trite stories and overblown caricature-esque...
  • Lyn
    Dec 01, 2011
    Hundreds, thousands of stories long to have a quotable verse, just one. Tale of Two Cities, Dickens masterpiece as far as I'm concerned, is bookended by two of the most recognizable quotes in all of English language. This is also the darkest story I have read of his, and no doubt, it's about the blo...
  • فهد الفهد
    Feb 03, 2012
    قصة مدينتين استعرت هذه الرواية من مكتبة الجامعة في بداية الألفية، كان ذلك قبل عالم الا?...
  • Emma
    Apr 25, 2012
    Christ on a bike - I’d forgotten how much concentration Dickens demands.   Reading the first few chapters of this book was, frankly, a chore. I could not be less bothered about The Mail and the more Dickens banged on about that never ending carriage journey the more I daydreamed about the...
  • Bookdragon Sean
    Jan 17, 2014
    Charles Dickens is a demanding writer. The narratives of Great Expectations and Oliver Twist are relaxed and simple when compared to this. Reading Dickens requires concentration, and a will to carry on when sometimes the writing gives you a headache. This is a historical novel. Dickens tells the ...
  • Kalliope
    Jun 29, 2015
    A TALE OF TWO TALES Reading Dickens’s approach to historical fiction, at first I could not help but remember Romola, which I read recently. And even if Romola seemed to have more of a Victorian than a Florentine Renaissance tone, the story and the context were very nicely woven together. While...
  • Michelle
    Feb 21, 2016
    I first read this in high school as a substitute for "Oliver Twist" which was not in my high school library catalog (it was in the elementary school catalog). Come to think of it now, I have never read that book. Weird... If ever I get a chance to meet "high-school-me", I bet she will be over the mo...