The Way Things are

The Way Things are

..". [captures] the relentless urgency of Lucretius' didacticism, his passionate conviction and proselytizing fervour.' --The Classical Review...

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Title:The Way Things are
Author:Lucretius
Rating:
Genres:Philosophy
ISBN:De rerum natura
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:265 pages pages

The Way Things are Reviews

  • Andrew
    Mar 20, 2011

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

  • Jonathan
    Apr 07, 2018

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

  • Nicholas Whyte
    Feb 09, 2010

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

    Wonderful translation by AE Stallings, one of my favorite poets. Lots of playful language. The lines flow nicely, and the sentence structure to get the rhymes is not obtrusive. Quite startling prescience at times about atomic structure, while other explanations of natural occurrences a...

    The De Rerum Natura is the sole surviving work of Lucretius, a Roman poet writing in the 1st century BC. The book summarizes and explains the principles of Epicureanism, a philosophy founded by the Greek philosopher Epicurus around 300 BC. Epicureanism emphasized that while gods existe...

    3.75 stars. Lucretius thoroughly convinced me that Roman mythology is bosh. :-) But his materialistic apologetics failed to convert me. Lucretius's poem follows the general outline of epicureanism as presented in Epicurus's Letter to Herodotus. His ontology begins and ends with ato...

    It's easy to read this book and snicker at all the things he got wrong, all the while being impressed and amazed at the bit he got right. He figured out that ball of wool and a ball of metal would fall at the same rate in a vacuum and yet he couldn't quite wrap his head around how a mi...

    The importance of reading influential classic books as original texts is an idea that has been drummed into me by well-meaning academics, but I have long been skeptical of the value of this practice. I have come to believe that I can often learn more from an expert on a particular thin...

    'And of the souls likewise, whatever are said to be in the profundity of Acheron, all the sufferings happen to ourselves, not in death, but in life. Tantalus, torpid with vain terror, does not (as it is reported) fear the huge rock impending over him in the air; but such terror rather ...

    At first, The Nature of Things seemed to me quite an extensive attempt at explaining the world without the use of mythology. Although undoubtedly interesting, Lucretius? poetry read like a manual, a compilation of rational thought processes which ultimately jumped to barely founded c...

    http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/1391691.html This is one of the best-argued cases for atheism I have read (speaking as a non-atheist). Millennia before Dawkins, Hitchens, or even Bertrand Russell, Lucretius argued the nature of the universe from first principles, concluding vigorously...

  • Clif Hostetler
    Aug 29, 2015

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

  • Jeremy
    Jan 02, 2010

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

  • Jon
    Aug 17, 2011

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

    Wonderful translation by AE Stallings, one of my favorite poets. Lots of playful language. The lines flow nicely, and the sentence structure to get the rhymes is not obtrusive. Quite startling prescience at times about atomic structure, while other explanations of natural occurrences a...

    The De Rerum Natura is the sole surviving work of Lucretius, a Roman poet writing in the 1st century BC. The book summarizes and explains the principles of Epicureanism, a philosophy founded by the Greek philosopher Epicurus around 300 BC. Epicureanism emphasized that while gods existe...

    3.75 stars. Lucretius thoroughly convinced me that Roman mythology is bosh. :-) But his materialistic apologetics failed to convert me. Lucretius's poem follows the general outline of epicureanism as presented in Epicurus's Letter to Herodotus. His ontology begins and ends with ato...

    It's easy to read this book and snicker at all the things he got wrong, all the while being impressed and amazed at the bit he got right. He figured out that ball of wool and a ball of metal would fall at the same rate in a vacuum and yet he couldn't quite wrap his head around how a mi...

    The importance of reading influential classic books as original texts is an idea that has been drummed into me by well-meaning academics, but I have long been skeptical of the value of this practice. I have come to believe that I can often learn more from an expert on a particular thin...

    'And of the souls likewise, whatever are said to be in the profundity of Acheron, all the sufferings happen to ourselves, not in death, but in life. Tantalus, torpid with vain terror, does not (as it is reported) fear the huge rock impending over him in the air; but such terror rather ...

    At first, The Nature of Things seemed to me quite an extensive attempt at explaining the world without the use of mythology. Although undoubtedly interesting, Lucretius? poetry read like a manual, a compilation of rational thought processes which ultimately jumped to barely founded c...

    http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/1391691.html This is one of the best-argued cases for atheism I have read (speaking as a non-atheist). Millennia before Dawkins, Hitchens, or even Bertrand Russell, Lucretius argued the nature of the universe from first principles, concluding vigorously...

    Sometimes boring, sometimes astonishing in its perception, sometimes silly because it is a very early attempt at seeing the entire universe (including our minds and spirits) as made up entirely of tiny seeds. Nothing exists except the seeds and the void. Various combinations of these a...

  • Erik Graff
    Jan 11, 2010

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

    Wonderful translation by AE Stallings, one of my favorite poets. Lots of playful language. The lines flow nicely, and the sentence structure to get the rhymes is not obtrusive. Quite startling prescience at times about atomic structure, while other explanations of natural occurrences a...

    The De Rerum Natura is the sole surviving work of Lucretius, a Roman poet writing in the 1st century BC. The book summarizes and explains the principles of Epicureanism, a philosophy founded by the Greek philosopher Epicurus around 300 BC. Epicureanism emphasized that while gods existe...

    3.75 stars. Lucretius thoroughly convinced me that Roman mythology is bosh. :-) But his materialistic apologetics failed to convert me. Lucretius's poem follows the general outline of epicureanism as presented in Epicurus's Letter to Herodotus. His ontology begins and ends with ato...

    It's easy to read this book and snicker at all the things he got wrong, all the while being impressed and amazed at the bit he got right. He figured out that ball of wool and a ball of metal would fall at the same rate in a vacuum and yet he couldn't quite wrap his head around how a mi...

    The importance of reading influential classic books as original texts is an idea that has been drummed into me by well-meaning academics, but I have long been skeptical of the value of this practice. I have come to believe that I can often learn more from an expert on a particular thin...

    'And of the souls likewise, whatever are said to be in the profundity of Acheron, all the sufferings happen to ourselves, not in death, but in life. Tantalus, torpid with vain terror, does not (as it is reported) fear the huge rock impending over him in the air; but such terror rather ...

    At first, The Nature of Things seemed to me quite an extensive attempt at explaining the world without the use of mythology. Although undoubtedly interesting, Lucretius? poetry read like a manual, a compilation of rational thought processes which ultimately jumped to barely founded c...

    http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/1391691.html This is one of the best-argued cases for atheism I have read (speaking as a non-atheist). Millennia before Dawkins, Hitchens, or even Bertrand Russell, Lucretius argued the nature of the universe from first principles, concluding vigorously...

    Sometimes boring, sometimes astonishing in its perception, sometimes silly because it is a very early attempt at seeing the entire universe (including our minds and spirits) as made up entirely of tiny seeds. Nothing exists except the seeds and the void. Various combinations of these a...

    Whatever happened to didactive poetry? The instance of De Rerum Natura shows one of many ways the Romans were different from us. Lucretius was known to his contemporaries as much for his poetic style as for the Epicurean atomism he preached. While I tried with my little Latin to app...

  • Bruce
    Apr 12, 2012

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

  • Manny
    Feb 01, 2013

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

  • Kristen
    Jul 18, 2009

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

    Wonderful translation by AE Stallings, one of my favorite poets. Lots of playful language. The lines flow nicely, and the sentence structure to get the rhymes is not obtrusive. Quite startling prescience at times about atomic structure, while other explanations of natural occurrences a...

    The De Rerum Natura is the sole surviving work of Lucretius, a Roman poet writing in the 1st century BC. The book summarizes and explains the principles of Epicureanism, a philosophy founded by the Greek philosopher Epicurus around 300 BC. Epicureanism emphasized that while gods existe...

    3.75 stars. Lucretius thoroughly convinced me that Roman mythology is bosh. :-) But his materialistic apologetics failed to convert me. Lucretius's poem follows the general outline of epicureanism as presented in Epicurus's Letter to Herodotus. His ontology begins and ends with ato...

    It's easy to read this book and snicker at all the things he got wrong, all the while being impressed and amazed at the bit he got right. He figured out that ball of wool and a ball of metal would fall at the same rate in a vacuum and yet he couldn't quite wrap his head around how a mi...

  • Alex
    Oct 02, 2011

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

    Wonderful translation by AE Stallings, one of my favorite poets. Lots of playful language. The lines flow nicely, and the sentence structure to get the rhymes is not obtrusive. Quite startling prescience at times about atomic structure, while other explanations of natural occurrences a...

    The De Rerum Natura is the sole surviving work of Lucretius, a Roman poet writing in the 1st century BC. The book summarizes and explains the principles of Epicureanism, a philosophy founded by the Greek philosopher Epicurus around 300 BC. Epicureanism emphasized that while gods existe...

    3.75 stars. Lucretius thoroughly convinced me that Roman mythology is bosh. :-) But his materialistic apologetics failed to convert me. Lucretius's poem follows the general outline of epicureanism as presented in Epicurus's Letter to Herodotus. His ontology begins and ends with ato...

    It's easy to read this book and snicker at all the things he got wrong, all the while being impressed and amazed at the bit he got right. He figured out that ball of wool and a ball of metal would fall at the same rate in a vacuum and yet he couldn't quite wrap his head around how a mi...

    The importance of reading influential classic books as original texts is an idea that has been drummed into me by well-meaning academics, but I have long been skeptical of the value of this practice. I have come to believe that I can often learn more from an expert on a particular thin...

    'And of the souls likewise, whatever are said to be in the profundity of Acheron, all the sufferings happen to ourselves, not in death, but in life. Tantalus, torpid with vain terror, does not (as it is reported) fear the huge rock impending over him in the air; but such terror rather ...

    At first, The Nature of Things seemed to me quite an extensive attempt at explaining the world without the use of mythology. Although undoubtedly interesting, Lucretius? poetry read like a manual, a compilation of rational thought processes which ultimately jumped to barely founded c...

    http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/1391691.html This is one of the best-argued cases for atheism I have read (speaking as a non-atheist). Millennia before Dawkins, Hitchens, or even Bertrand Russell, Lucretius argued the nature of the universe from first principles, concluding vigorously...

    Sometimes boring, sometimes astonishing in its perception, sometimes silly because it is a very early attempt at seeing the entire universe (including our minds and spirits) as made up entirely of tiny seeds. Nothing exists except the seeds and the void. Various combinations of these a...

    Whatever happened to didactive poetry? The instance of De Rerum Natura shows one of many ways the Romans were different from us. Lucretius was known to his contemporaries as much for his poetic style as for the Epicurean atomism he preached. While I tried with my little Latin to app...

    This translation is beautiful. ...

    The idea is great but the problem with this book is that it's extraordinarily long and mostly boring and I don't remember a single word of it. ...

  • Jesse
    Aug 05, 2010

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

  • Nemo
    Sep 24, 2010

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

  • Lydia
    Apr 27, 2019

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

  • Genni
    Jan 04, 2016

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

    Wonderful translation by AE Stallings, one of my favorite poets. Lots of playful language. The lines flow nicely, and the sentence structure to get the rhymes is not obtrusive. Quite startling prescience at times about atomic structure, while other explanations of natural occurrences a...

    The De Rerum Natura is the sole surviving work of Lucretius, a Roman poet writing in the 1st century BC. The book summarizes and explains the principles of Epicureanism, a philosophy founded by the Greek philosopher Epicurus around 300 BC. Epicureanism emphasized that while gods existe...

    3.75 stars. Lucretius thoroughly convinced me that Roman mythology is bosh. :-) But his materialistic apologetics failed to convert me. Lucretius's poem follows the general outline of epicureanism as presented in Epicurus's Letter to Herodotus. His ontology begins and ends with ato...

  • Caroline
    Feb 21, 2012

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

    Wonderful translation by AE Stallings, one of my favorite poets. Lots of playful language. The lines flow nicely, and the sentence structure to get the rhymes is not obtrusive. Quite startling prescience at times about atomic structure, while other explanations of natural occurrences a...

  • Jan-Maat
    Jun 26, 2011

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

  • David Sarkies
    Jul 28, 2013

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

  • Edward
    Apr 23, 2015

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

  • Gary  Beauregard Bottomley
    Jul 31, 2016

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

  • Evan Leach
    Feb 11, 2012

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

    Wonderful translation by AE Stallings, one of my favorite poets. Lots of playful language. The lines flow nicely, and the sentence structure to get the rhymes is not obtrusive. Quite startling prescience at times about atomic structure, while other explanations of natural occurrences a...

    The De Rerum Natura is the sole surviving work of Lucretius, a Roman poet writing in the 1st century BC. The book summarizes and explains the principles of Epicureanism, a philosophy founded by the Greek philosopher Epicurus around 300 BC. Epicureanism emphasized that while gods existe...

  • Darwin8u
    Mar 28, 2012

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

  • G.R. Reader
    Nov 08, 2013

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

  • Laurent
    Dec 31, 2014

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

    Wonderful translation by AE Stallings, one of my favorite poets. Lots of playful language. The lines flow nicely, and the sentence structure to get the rhymes is not obtrusive. Quite startling prescience at times about atomic structure, while other explanations of natural occurrences a...

    The De Rerum Natura is the sole surviving work of Lucretius, a Roman poet writing in the 1st century BC. The book summarizes and explains the principles of Epicureanism, a philosophy founded by the Greek philosopher Epicurus around 300 BC. Epicureanism emphasized that while gods existe...

    3.75 stars. Lucretius thoroughly convinced me that Roman mythology is bosh. :-) But his materialistic apologetics failed to convert me. Lucretius's poem follows the general outline of epicureanism as presented in Epicurus's Letter to Herodotus. His ontology begins and ends with ato...

    It's easy to read this book and snicker at all the things he got wrong, all the while being impressed and amazed at the bit he got right. He figured out that ball of wool and a ball of metal would fall at the same rate in a vacuum and yet he couldn't quite wrap his head around how a mi...

    The importance of reading influential classic books as original texts is an idea that has been drummed into me by well-meaning academics, but I have long been skeptical of the value of this practice. I have come to believe that I can often learn more from an expert on a particular thin...

    'And of the souls likewise, whatever are said to be in the profundity of Acheron, all the sufferings happen to ourselves, not in death, but in life. Tantalus, torpid with vain terror, does not (as it is reported) fear the huge rock impending over him in the air; but such terror rather ...

    At first, The Nature of Things seemed to me quite an extensive attempt at explaining the world without the use of mythology. Although undoubtedly interesting, Lucretius? poetry read like a manual, a compilation of rational thought processes which ultimately jumped to barely founded c...

  • Erick
    Jun 23, 2019

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

  • Barry
    Dec 21, 2017

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

    Wonderful translation by AE Stallings, one of my favorite poets. Lots of playful language. The lines flow nicely, and the sentence structure to get the rhymes is not obtrusive. Quite startling prescience at times about atomic structure, while other explanations of natural occurrences a...

    The De Rerum Natura is the sole surviving work of Lucretius, a Roman poet writing in the 1st century BC. The book summarizes and explains the principles of Epicureanism, a philosophy founded by the Greek philosopher Epicurus around 300 BC. Epicureanism emphasized that while gods existe...

    3.75 stars. Lucretius thoroughly convinced me that Roman mythology is bosh. :-) But his materialistic apologetics failed to convert me. Lucretius's poem follows the general outline of epicureanism as presented in Epicurus's Letter to Herodotus. His ontology begins and ends with ato...

    It's easy to read this book and snicker at all the things he got wrong, all the while being impressed and amazed at the bit he got right. He figured out that ball of wool and a ball of metal would fall at the same rate in a vacuum and yet he couldn't quite wrap his head around how a mi...

    The importance of reading influential classic books as original texts is an idea that has been drummed into me by well-meaning academics, but I have long been skeptical of the value of this practice. I have come to believe that I can often learn more from an expert on a particular thin...

  • Shya̋m
    Nov 24, 2018

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

  • Sarah
    Dec 25, 2018

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

    Wonderful translation by AE Stallings, one of my favorite poets. Lots of playful language. The lines flow nicely, and the sentence structure to get the rhymes is not obtrusive. Quite startling prescience at times about atomic structure, while other explanations of natural occurrences a...

    The De Rerum Natura is the sole surviving work of Lucretius, a Roman poet writing in the 1st century BC. The book summarizes and explains the principles of Epicureanism, a philosophy founded by the Greek philosopher Epicurus around 300 BC. Epicureanism emphasized that while gods existe...

    3.75 stars. Lucretius thoroughly convinced me that Roman mythology is bosh. :-) But his materialistic apologetics failed to convert me. Lucretius's poem follows the general outline of epicureanism as presented in Epicurus's Letter to Herodotus. His ontology begins and ends with ato...

    It's easy to read this book and snicker at all the things he got wrong, all the while being impressed and amazed at the bit he got right. He figured out that ball of wool and a ball of metal would fall at the same rate in a vacuum and yet he couldn't quite wrap his head around how a mi...

    The importance of reading influential classic books as original texts is an idea that has been drummed into me by well-meaning academics, but I have long been skeptical of the value of this practice. I have come to believe that I can often learn more from an expert on a particular thin...

    'And of the souls likewise, whatever are said to be in the profundity of Acheron, all the sufferings happen to ourselves, not in death, but in life. Tantalus, torpid with vain terror, does not (as it is reported) fear the huge rock impending over him in the air; but such terror rather ...

    At first, The Nature of Things seemed to me quite an extensive attempt at explaining the world without the use of mythology. Although undoubtedly interesting, Lucretius? poetry read like a manual, a compilation of rational thought processes which ultimately jumped to barely founded c...

    http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/1391691.html This is one of the best-argued cases for atheism I have read (speaking as a non-atheist). Millennia before Dawkins, Hitchens, or even Bertrand Russell, Lucretius argued the nature of the universe from first principles, concluding vigorously...

    Sometimes boring, sometimes astonishing in its perception, sometimes silly because it is a very early attempt at seeing the entire universe (including our minds and spirits) as made up entirely of tiny seeds. Nothing exists except the seeds and the void. Various combinations of these a...

    Whatever happened to didactive poetry? The instance of De Rerum Natura shows one of many ways the Romans were different from us. Lucretius was known to his contemporaries as much for his poetic style as for the Epicurean atomism he preached. While I tried with my little Latin to app...

    This translation is beautiful. ...

  • Jawad
    May 06, 2018

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...

    First, an apology for only giving it three stars. I am well aware that this is a brilliant piece of poetry, but my Latin is very poor, and I rapidly abandoned my initial plan of reading it in the original with the English translation alongside. In a way, though, I'm following Lucretius...

    Epicurian Physics 31 July 2013 Well, here I am, once again sitting in the passenger seat of my Dad's car on our final trek to Melbourne, and since I have been reading, sleeping, or driving for most of the day, I might as well fix up a couple of my reviews while I am sitting here (...

    Introduction Further Reading A Note on the Text and Translation Acknowledgements --The Nature of Things Notes Glossary of Proper Names ...

    The antiquity of this book calls for respect and appreciation. However, for a modern reader it is very boring to read. It's a long (300 pages) poem written in the first century BC in which the author pontificates about the physical sciences for the purpose of defending Epicureanism phi...

    Wow, this was a real surprise. Lucretius was just so shockingly ahead of his time. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. His conception of atomic theory is surprisingly accurate, down to recognizing that atoms are composed of abo...

    The Nature of Things is a long narrative Latin poem which sets out Epicurean philosophy. This I read in an English prose translation. The Epicureans believed in atomic theory and so this aspect of the work feels most familiar and recognisably modern and one can be impressed that peopl...

    Matter, for sure, is not one solid mass Close packed together. We see that everything. Diminishes, and through the long lapse of time We note that all things seem to melt away As years and age withdraw them from our sight. And yet the sum of things stays unimpaired. This is ...

    There are a handful of books that seem to float above the rabble. They are certainly not scripture, but belong on a shelf above philosophy. Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. On the Nature of Things belongs on the sh...

    But, as I have said before, the majority of people suffer from a common disease, as in a plague, with their false notions about things, and their number is increasing (for in mutual emulation, they catch the disease from one another, like sheep). ?Oenoanda Inscription, fr. 3 By th...

    The Nature of Things (or De Rerum Natura in the original Latin) by Lucretius is a combination of poetry, science and philosophy. The poem explores Lucretius? belief about the gods, humanity, the senses, the world, and the universe, all through the philosophical framework of Epicurus....

    Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? You know, full of cutting-edge particle physics and cosmology (who cares if it's all wrong? it's magnificently wrong) but with bits about earthquakes and evolution, mixed up with hot sex tips and complaints about why women ...

    Lucretius wrote this explication and celebration of Epicureanism in the first century BCE. The text was lost for many years but apparently rediscovered during the Renaissance, and it has been influential ever since. There is probably no translation from the Latin that perfectly combine...

    "True piety lies in the power to contemplate the universe with a quiet mind." This is a truth even C.S. Lewis, a sincere Christian, assented to, remarking that only the atheist can believe. So it is with Lucretius, whose poetry here anticipates many scientific discoveries, including s...

    When was the last time you read an ancient Roman text that predicts quantum theory and genetics, promotes sustainable agriculture, and is written in the form of an epic poem? Anyone? Anyone? Jesus Christ this was weird. And good. And nothing like it will ever be written again. I dig...

    It might have taken me longer than it should have to finally read this work, but I was fairly sure I wasn't going to be that impressed with it before I started; and now that I am done with it, I can now say for certain that I am not that impressed. My procrastination was warranted as f...

    Philosophy is Supposed to be Fun! Cicero, because of his personal aversion to the Epicurean philosophy, didn't quite do it justice in his book The Nature of the Gods, which introduced the Greek philosophical schools to the Romans (He all but made the Epicurean the laughing-stock of ...

    If I were to try to prove that time machines were possible, this is the book I would submit as exhibit one for my evidence. There is really no other explanation for this book than the fact that Richard Feynman had built a time machine and had the opportunity to talk with Lucretius for ...

    Wonderful translation by AE Stallings, one of my favorite poets. Lots of playful language. The lines flow nicely, and the sentence structure to get the rhymes is not obtrusive. Quite startling prescience at times about atomic structure, while other explanations of natural occurrences a...

    The De Rerum Natura is the sole surviving work of Lucretius, a Roman poet writing in the 1st century BC. The book summarizes and explains the principles of Epicureanism, a philosophy founded by the Greek philosopher Epicurus around 300 BC. Epicureanism emphasized that while gods existe...

    3.75 stars. Lucretius thoroughly convinced me that Roman mythology is bosh. :-) But his materialistic apologetics failed to convert me. Lucretius's poem follows the general outline of epicureanism as presented in Epicurus's Letter to Herodotus. His ontology begins and ends with ato...

    It's easy to read this book and snicker at all the things he got wrong, all the while being impressed and amazed at the bit he got right. He figured out that ball of wool and a ball of metal would fall at the same rate in a vacuum and yet he couldn't quite wrap his head around how a mi...

    The importance of reading influential classic books as original texts is an idea that has been drummed into me by well-meaning academics, but I have long been skeptical of the value of this practice. I have come to believe that I can often learn more from an expert on a particular thin...

    'And of the souls likewise, whatever are said to be in the profundity of Acheron, all the sufferings happen to ourselves, not in death, but in life. Tantalus, torpid with vain terror, does not (as it is reported) fear the huge rock impending over him in the air; but such terror rather ...

  • Fergus
    Mar 26, 2019

    ALL MATTER? NEVER MIND! -Bertrand Russell?s Grandmother (Mocking his Materialist Philosophy) When I was in my late teens I had a stunning Lucretian prise de conscience that utterly knocked the wind out of my youthful sails. It seemed the overwhelming answer to Eliot?s ?over...