Sonnets to Orpheus

Sonnets to Orpheus

To Rilke himself the Sonnets to Orpheus were "perhaps the most mysterious in the way they came up and entrusted themselves to me, the most enigmatic dictation I have ever held through and achieved; the whole first part was written down in a single breathless act of obedience, between the 2nd and 5th of February, without one word being doubtful or having to be changed." Wit To Rilke himself the Sonnets to Orpheus were "perhaps the most mysterious in the way they came up and entrusted themselve...

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Title:Sonnets to Orpheus
Author:Rainer Maria Rilke
Rating:
Genres:Poetry
ISBN:Die Sonette an Orpheus: Geschrieben als ein Grab-Mal für Wera Ouckama Knoop
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:160 pages pages

Sonnets to Orpheus Reviews

  • Marci
    Apr 02, 2007

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

  • Eli
    Jul 27, 2010

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

    I've been trawling the Rilke sonnets for months and it started with this bi-lingual edition. Meanwhile I have collected numerous other English translations. This edition, with the C.F. MacIntyre translation, has ended up at the bottom of the pile. For a start it's not a very attractive...

    Wow, just wow. I started off thinking that this collection of sonnets paled in comparison to the Duino Elegies, but reading the last nine poems this morning really drove the entire point home. The whole book builds towards the final sixth of its length, and when you put it all together...

    I am pretty sure this is the worst way to read poetry, like a book, in one go. But still, what I missed out on meaning either first order or more, I made up for with the pleasure of reading out poetry in German and working on pronunciation, and more enjoyably, enunciation. Now on to Ge...

    In his notes on translating the Sonnets to Orpheus (I skipped the 90-page introduction, thanks all the same), Willis Barnstone claims his rendering of the Sonnets lets Rilke "sing". If that's true, it's the kind of drunk and desperate singing that Bobcat Goldthwait's character does at ...

  • anya
    May 08, 2007

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

  • Albert
    Nov 30, 2010

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

  • Kat
    Nov 13, 2007

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

    I've been trawling the Rilke sonnets for months and it started with this bi-lingual edition. Meanwhile I have collected numerous other English translations. This edition, with the C.F. MacIntyre translation, has ended up at the bottom of the pile. For a start it's not a very attractive...

    Wow, just wow. I started off thinking that this collection of sonnets paled in comparison to the Duino Elegies, but reading the last nine poems this morning really drove the entire point home. The whole book builds towards the final sixth of its length, and when you put it all together...

    I am pretty sure this is the worst way to read poetry, like a book, in one go. But still, what I missed out on meaning either first order or more, I made up for with the pleasure of reading out poetry in German and working on pronunciation, and more enjoyably, enunciation. Now on to Ge...

    In his notes on translating the Sonnets to Orpheus (I skipped the 90-page introduction, thanks all the same), Willis Barnstone claims his rendering of the Sonnets lets Rilke "sing". If that's true, it's the kind of drunk and desperate singing that Bobcat Goldthwait's character does at ...

    I really enjoyed this a lot. It's one of those books to pull out during the in-between-times when nothing else is quite working reading or writing wise and you just want something else to focus on because that's the thing that'll jog everything else back into place. I'm definitely goin...

    I know that I love Rilke's poetry, but this translation doesn't even come close to doing it justice. I need to find a different version. ...

  • Paul
    Aug 27, 2008

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

  • Adam
    Aug 17, 2007

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

  • Matthew
    Nov 19, 2007

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

  • Dylan
    Oct 10, 2009

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

  • Dan
    Mar 11, 2008

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

  • Amanda
    Aug 19, 2008

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

    I've been trawling the Rilke sonnets for months and it started with this bi-lingual edition. Meanwhile I have collected numerous other English translations. This edition, with the C.F. MacIntyre translation, has ended up at the bottom of the pile. For a start it's not a very attractive...

    Wow, just wow. I started off thinking that this collection of sonnets paled in comparison to the Duino Elegies, but reading the last nine poems this morning really drove the entire point home. The whole book builds towards the final sixth of its length, and when you put it all together...

  • Brian
    Nov 16, 2012

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

  • Jonfaith
    Aug 12, 2017

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

  • Korin McGinty
    Jun 17, 2011

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

    I've been trawling the Rilke sonnets for months and it started with this bi-lingual edition. Meanwhile I have collected numerous other English translations. This edition, with the C.F. MacIntyre translation, has ended up at the bottom of the pile. For a start it's not a very attractive...

    Wow, just wow. I started off thinking that this collection of sonnets paled in comparison to the Duino Elegies, but reading the last nine poems this morning really drove the entire point home. The whole book builds towards the final sixth of its length, and when you put it all together...

    I am pretty sure this is the worst way to read poetry, like a book, in one go. But still, what I missed out on meaning either first order or more, I made up for with the pleasure of reading out poetry in German and working on pronunciation, and more enjoyably, enunciation. Now on to Ge...

    In his notes on translating the Sonnets to Orpheus (I skipped the 90-page introduction, thanks all the same), Willis Barnstone claims his rendering of the Sonnets lets Rilke "sing". If that's true, it's the kind of drunk and desperate singing that Bobcat Goldthwait's character does at ...

    I really enjoyed this a lot. It's one of those books to pull out during the in-between-times when nothing else is quite working reading or writing wise and you just want something else to focus on because that's the thing that'll jog everything else back into place. I'm definitely goin...

  • Philippe
    May 25, 2015

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

    I've been trawling the Rilke sonnets for months and it started with this bi-lingual edition. Meanwhile I have collected numerous other English translations. This edition, with the C.F. MacIntyre translation, has ended up at the bottom of the pile. For a start it's not a very attractive...

  • Mar'yana
    Aug 09, 2014

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

  • Jim Puskas
    May 25, 2019

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

    I've been trawling the Rilke sonnets for months and it started with this bi-lingual edition. Meanwhile I have collected numerous other English translations. This edition, with the C.F. MacIntyre translation, has ended up at the bottom of the pile. For a start it's not a very attractive...

    Wow, just wow. I started off thinking that this collection of sonnets paled in comparison to the Duino Elegies, but reading the last nine poems this morning really drove the entire point home. The whole book builds towards the final sixth of its length, and when you put it all together...

    I am pretty sure this is the worst way to read poetry, like a book, in one go. But still, what I missed out on meaning either first order or more, I made up for with the pleasure of reading out poetry in German and working on pronunciation, and more enjoyably, enunciation. Now on to Ge...

    In his notes on translating the Sonnets to Orpheus (I skipped the 90-page introduction, thanks all the same), Willis Barnstone claims his rendering of the Sonnets lets Rilke "sing". If that's true, it's the kind of drunk and desperate singing that Bobcat Goldthwait's character does at ...

    I really enjoyed this a lot. It's one of those books to pull out during the in-between-times when nothing else is quite working reading or writing wise and you just want something else to focus on because that's the thing that'll jog everything else back into place. I'm definitely goin...

    I know that I love Rilke's poetry, but this translation doesn't even come close to doing it justice. I need to find a different version. ...

    I read this collection of poetry for my classic lit challenges that I am a part of through my Classic Literature group on Good Reads. It counts as the ?R? for Rainer M. Rilke on my A-Z classics challenge and for the German lit shelf on classics bingo. I have never read anything ...

    At first encounter, it may seem a bit odd that Rilke?s collection of 55 sonnets ?to Orpheus? were actually inspired not by a musician but by the death of a young dancer, Wera Knoop. But through poetic licence, grace and metaphor, Rilke deftly overleaps that apparent mismatch. And...

  • William
    Mar 25, 2013

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

  • Maddy
    Jun 08, 2018

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

    I've been trawling the Rilke sonnets for months and it started with this bi-lingual edition. Meanwhile I have collected numerous other English translations. This edition, with the C.F. MacIntyre translation, has ended up at the bottom of the pile. For a start it's not a very attractive...

    Wow, just wow. I started off thinking that this collection of sonnets paled in comparison to the Duino Elegies, but reading the last nine poems this morning really drove the entire point home. The whole book builds towards the final sixth of its length, and when you put it all together...

    I am pretty sure this is the worst way to read poetry, like a book, in one go. But still, what I missed out on meaning either first order or more, I made up for with the pleasure of reading out poetry in German and working on pronunciation, and more enjoyably, enunciation. Now on to Ge...

    In his notes on translating the Sonnets to Orpheus (I skipped the 90-page introduction, thanks all the same), Willis Barnstone claims his rendering of the Sonnets lets Rilke "sing". If that's true, it's the kind of drunk and desperate singing that Bobcat Goldthwait's character does at ...

    I really enjoyed this a lot. It's one of those books to pull out during the in-between-times when nothing else is quite working reading or writing wise and you just want something else to focus on because that's the thing that'll jog everything else back into place. I'm definitely goin...

    I know that I love Rilke's poetry, but this translation doesn't even come close to doing it justice. I need to find a different version. ...

    I read this collection of poetry for my classic lit challenges that I am a part of through my Classic Literature group on Good Reads. It counts as the ?R? for Rainer M. Rilke on my A-Z classics challenge and for the German lit shelf on classics bingo. I have never read anything ...

  • Leslie
    Jan 03, 2016

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

  • C.M. Crockford
    Feb 18, 2018

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

    I've been trawling the Rilke sonnets for months and it started with this bi-lingual edition. Meanwhile I have collected numerous other English translations. This edition, with the C.F. MacIntyre translation, has ended up at the bottom of the pile. For a start it's not a very attractive...

    Wow, just wow. I started off thinking that this collection of sonnets paled in comparison to the Duino Elegies, but reading the last nine poems this morning really drove the entire point home. The whole book builds towards the final sixth of its length, and when you put it all together...

    I am pretty sure this is the worst way to read poetry, like a book, in one go. But still, what I missed out on meaning either first order or more, I made up for with the pleasure of reading out poetry in German and working on pronunciation, and more enjoyably, enunciation. Now on to Ge...

    In his notes on translating the Sonnets to Orpheus (I skipped the 90-page introduction, thanks all the same), Willis Barnstone claims his rendering of the Sonnets lets Rilke "sing". If that's true, it's the kind of drunk and desperate singing that Bobcat Goldthwait's character does at ...

    I really enjoyed this a lot. It's one of those books to pull out during the in-between-times when nothing else is quite working reading or writing wise and you just want something else to focus on because that's the thing that'll jog everything else back into place. I'm definitely goin...

    I know that I love Rilke's poetry, but this translation doesn't even come close to doing it justice. I need to find a different version. ...

    I read this collection of poetry for my classic lit challenges that I am a part of through my Classic Literature group on Good Reads. It counts as the ?R? for Rainer M. Rilke on my A-Z classics challenge and for the German lit shelf on classics bingo. I have never read anything ...

    At first encounter, it may seem a bit odd that Rilke?s collection of 55 sonnets ?to Orpheus? were actually inspired not by a musician but by the death of a young dancer, Wera Knoop. But through poetic licence, grace and metaphor, Rilke deftly overleaps that apparent mismatch. And...

    2 stars A companion to the Duino Elegies sensu lato, this collection of 55(!) sonnets and a few fragments deserves to be read by anyone into poetry; however, it's not nearly as strong in any case and is best taken slowly, perhaps a few sonnets each days (parsing the meaning of each ...

    This is probably five stars already in my mind but I really would like to study German and then read it again; having original German text next to the Finnish translation just nurtured this desire to truly taste the real words and see how powerful they are. I really liked the translati...

    You can tell at points that Rilke wrote this in a rush yet it's often deeply profound in its introspection, attempts to clutch the mystic and reverent to the heart. It certainly cut to certain places in mine. ...

  • Dorotea
    Nov 07, 2017

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

  • Robert Case
    Sep 25, 2018

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

  • Steven Godin
    Sep 11, 2017

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

  • Logan
    Oct 06, 2018

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

    I've been trawling the Rilke sonnets for months and it started with this bi-lingual edition. Meanwhile I have collected numerous other English translations. This edition, with the C.F. MacIntyre translation, has ended up at the bottom of the pile. For a start it's not a very attractive...

    Wow, just wow. I started off thinking that this collection of sonnets paled in comparison to the Duino Elegies, but reading the last nine poems this morning really drove the entire point home. The whole book builds towards the final sixth of its length, and when you put it all together...

    I am pretty sure this is the worst way to read poetry, like a book, in one go. But still, what I missed out on meaning either first order or more, I made up for with the pleasure of reading out poetry in German and working on pronunciation, and more enjoyably, enunciation. Now on to Ge...

    In his notes on translating the Sonnets to Orpheus (I skipped the 90-page introduction, thanks all the same), Willis Barnstone claims his rendering of the Sonnets lets Rilke "sing". If that's true, it's the kind of drunk and desperate singing that Bobcat Goldthwait's character does at ...

    I really enjoyed this a lot. It's one of those books to pull out during the in-between-times when nothing else is quite working reading or writing wise and you just want something else to focus on because that's the thing that'll jog everything else back into place. I'm definitely goin...

    I know that I love Rilke's poetry, but this translation doesn't even come close to doing it justice. I need to find a different version. ...

    I read this collection of poetry for my classic lit challenges that I am a part of through my Classic Literature group on Good Reads. It counts as the ?R? for Rainer M. Rilke on my A-Z classics challenge and for the German lit shelf on classics bingo. I have never read anything ...

    At first encounter, it may seem a bit odd that Rilke?s collection of 55 sonnets ?to Orpheus? were actually inspired not by a musician but by the death of a young dancer, Wera Knoop. But through poetic licence, grace and metaphor, Rilke deftly overleaps that apparent mismatch. And...

    2 stars A companion to the Duino Elegies sensu lato, this collection of 55(!) sonnets and a few fragments deserves to be read by anyone into poetry; however, it's not nearly as strong in any case and is best taken slowly, perhaps a few sonnets each days (parsing the meaning of each ...

  • Caleb
    Nov 28, 2018

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

  • Laura
    Apr 28, 2018

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

  • Valtteri
    Oct 06, 2017

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

    I've been trawling the Rilke sonnets for months and it started with this bi-lingual edition. Meanwhile I have collected numerous other English translations. This edition, with the C.F. MacIntyre translation, has ended up at the bottom of the pile. For a start it's not a very attractive...

    Wow, just wow. I started off thinking that this collection of sonnets paled in comparison to the Duino Elegies, but reading the last nine poems this morning really drove the entire point home. The whole book builds towards the final sixth of its length, and when you put it all together...

    I am pretty sure this is the worst way to read poetry, like a book, in one go. But still, what I missed out on meaning either first order or more, I made up for with the pleasure of reading out poetry in German and working on pronunciation, and more enjoyably, enunciation. Now on to Ge...

    In his notes on translating the Sonnets to Orpheus (I skipped the 90-page introduction, thanks all the same), Willis Barnstone claims his rendering of the Sonnets lets Rilke "sing". If that's true, it's the kind of drunk and desperate singing that Bobcat Goldthwait's character does at ...

    I really enjoyed this a lot. It's one of those books to pull out during the in-between-times when nothing else is quite working reading or writing wise and you just want something else to focus on because that's the thing that'll jog everything else back into place. I'm definitely goin...

    I know that I love Rilke's poetry, but this translation doesn't even come close to doing it justice. I need to find a different version. ...

    I read this collection of poetry for my classic lit challenges that I am a part of through my Classic Literature group on Good Reads. It counts as the ?R? for Rainer M. Rilke on my A-Z classics challenge and for the German lit shelf on classics bingo. I have never read anything ...

    At first encounter, it may seem a bit odd that Rilke?s collection of 55 sonnets ?to Orpheus? were actually inspired not by a musician but by the death of a young dancer, Wera Knoop. But through poetic licence, grace and metaphor, Rilke deftly overleaps that apparent mismatch. And...

    2 stars A companion to the Duino Elegies sensu lato, this collection of 55(!) sonnets and a few fragments deserves to be read by anyone into poetry; however, it's not nearly as strong in any case and is best taken slowly, perhaps a few sonnets each days (parsing the meaning of each ...

    This is probably five stars already in my mind but I really would like to study German and then read it again; having original German text next to the Finnish translation just nurtured this desire to truly taste the real words and see how powerful they are. I really liked the translati...

  • Sasha
    Feb 17, 2019

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

    I've been trawling the Rilke sonnets for months and it started with this bi-lingual edition. Meanwhile I have collected numerous other English translations. This edition, with the C.F. MacIntyre translation, has ended up at the bottom of the pile. For a start it's not a very attractive...

    Wow, just wow. I started off thinking that this collection of sonnets paled in comparison to the Duino Elegies, but reading the last nine poems this morning really drove the entire point home. The whole book builds towards the final sixth of its length, and when you put it all together...

    I am pretty sure this is the worst way to read poetry, like a book, in one go. But still, what I missed out on meaning either first order or more, I made up for with the pleasure of reading out poetry in German and working on pronunciation, and more enjoyably, enunciation. Now on to Ge...

    In his notes on translating the Sonnets to Orpheus (I skipped the 90-page introduction, thanks all the same), Willis Barnstone claims his rendering of the Sonnets lets Rilke "sing". If that's true, it's the kind of drunk and desperate singing that Bobcat Goldthwait's character does at ...

    I really enjoyed this a lot. It's one of those books to pull out during the in-between-times when nothing else is quite working reading or writing wise and you just want something else to focus on because that's the thing that'll jog everything else back into place. I'm definitely goin...

    I know that I love Rilke's poetry, but this translation doesn't even come close to doing it justice. I need to find a different version. ...

    I read this collection of poetry for my classic lit challenges that I am a part of through my Classic Literature group on Good Reads. It counts as the ?R? for Rainer M. Rilke on my A-Z classics challenge and for the German lit shelf on classics bingo. I have never read anything ...

    At first encounter, it may seem a bit odd that Rilke?s collection of 55 sonnets ?to Orpheus? were actually inspired not by a musician but by the death of a young dancer, Wera Knoop. But through poetic licence, grace and metaphor, Rilke deftly overleaps that apparent mismatch. And...

    2 stars A companion to the Duino Elegies sensu lato, this collection of 55(!) sonnets and a few fragments deserves to be read by anyone into poetry; however, it's not nearly as strong in any case and is best taken slowly, perhaps a few sonnets each days (parsing the meaning of each ...

    This is probably five stars already in my mind but I really would like to study German and then read it again; having original German text next to the Finnish translation just nurtured this desire to truly taste the real words and see how powerful they are. I really liked the translati...

    You can tell at points that Rilke wrote this in a rush yet it's often deeply profound in its introspection, attempts to clutch the mystic and reverent to the heart. It certainly cut to certain places in mine. ...

    Look, I love Rilke as much as the next person who used to read "Archaic Bust of Apollo" in poetry seminar. But, this should've been called "Sonnets to Morpheus" because it put me to SLEEP. ...

  • Nv
    Aug 22, 2019

    It's a shame I couldn't have read Sonnets to Orpheus in the original text, but alas, my German is not up to scratch. Whilst writing in 1922 on his deeply philosophical Duino Elegies, and experiencing what he described as a 'savage creative storm' Rilke wrote these extraordinary, darkly...

    Even as the farmer labors there where the seed turns into summer, it is not his work. It is Earth who gives. Despite the parched ground it is but a shade of spring outside. The world appears geared to disrupt such edenic days with the distant rumble of foreign thunder and a blurre...

    A classic, certainly. But I always feel like I'm missing out on most of the music when I read poetry in translation. ...

    Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus were written, remarkably, in a few weeks in a kind creative overflow after finishing The Duino Elegies, a group of ten poems that took Rilke ten years to write. Hearing these poems in German is a memorable experience (even if you don't know the language). The...

    This book was bought for me on one of the most romantic and fulfilling evenings of my short life. Fresh from the Met's "Orfeo ed Euridice" wandering into a bookshop in the East Village, and returning home to a mind-gasm of reading aloud with someone I care dearly for. This collection i...

    But you now, you whom I knew like a flower whose name I don?t know, I will once more remember and show you to them, you who were taken away, beautiful playmate of the invincible cry Dancer first, who suddenly, with body full of lingering, paused, as though her youngness were b...

    There is this cemetery I used to go for a walk. It never felt like a cemetery, but a huge park full of tall trees and bizarre and beautiful sculptures and lazy cats. One day I came back there with a friend and accidentally we crashed into a funeral. A hearse, a woman crying, my friend ...

    While I found some of these sonnets thought-provoking, they were mostly too obscure & difficult to understand for me. I appreciated the translator's notes and made extensive use of them but Rilke's philosophy about death was enigmatic. And the allusions to Orpheus and Eurydice were...

    My review is incredibly influenced by the fact that just before this, I read Averno. Louise Glück?s poetry has a special place in my heart, so my judgement suffers terribly from this. Rilke?s poetry is great, but it didn?t make me feel as Averno did. ...

    This book was savored, digested a few pages at a time during July and August of this summer's adventure on a bicycle bicycle across the eastern half of the country and the Transamerica Bicycle Trail. In the midst of this long journey, I found Rilke's poetry to be full of possibilities ...

    I haven't stopped reading this book since I received it as a gift in the spring of 2006. Rilke is arguably the greatest poet of the 20th century. He confirms Holderlin's great words that poetry points to being itself. ...

    A more literal, sparer translation than the Stephen Mitchell, good for students of German and, if less beautiful, truer to the succinctness of the original. Especially recommended is Sonnet #2, though there is plenty of heart-crushing material to be found here. ...

    Oh, this is strange, passionate, poetry that is concerned with music, death,love, life, ecstacy--but trying to get at those things thru language. You have to read this before you die. ...

    Coming back to this volume has been interesting. It has a magical force to it--the speaker and the presumed audience seem to shift in delicate ways, although the presumed structure is Rilke writing to Orpheus, and there is a sense that Rilke is channeling some deep and wise force in th...

    II.5 Flower-muscle, slowly pulling open the anemone?s vast meadow morning, until the loud sky?s polyphonic light comes pouring down into its womb, muscle of infinite reception flexed in the quiet flower star, sometimes so overwhelmed by fullness that the sunset?s call...

    Upon rereading Rainer Maria Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus in a one hour sitting, well, except for the two midnight breaks, both being rather heroically flawed attempts to rock my little one to sleep, I found new appreciation for the pure music of the singing parts (the flowing sequence of...

    Expecting difficulty with his modernist poetry, as I began re-reading this, I first focused on understanding the meaning of the poems. This became a secondary concern after a few pages as I found myself enjoying the beauty of the language and the thought, and not worrying about the mea...

    I don't know German, but I love bilingual editions (and not because I believe the translation is inferior or some such nonsense). I've at least heard enough German to approximate some of the sound, and the recurrent words/themes help. I like that mund (mouth) is similar to the Spanish ...

    I've been trawling the Rilke sonnets for months and it started with this bi-lingual edition. Meanwhile I have collected numerous other English translations. This edition, with the C.F. MacIntyre translation, has ended up at the bottom of the pile. For a start it's not a very attractive...

    Wow, just wow. I started off thinking that this collection of sonnets paled in comparison to the Duino Elegies, but reading the last nine poems this morning really drove the entire point home. The whole book builds towards the final sixth of its length, and when you put it all together...

    I am pretty sure this is the worst way to read poetry, like a book, in one go. But still, what I missed out on meaning either first order or more, I made up for with the pleasure of reading out poetry in German and working on pronunciation, and more enjoyably, enunciation. Now on to Ge...