The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America

Erik Larson's gifts as a storyteller are magnificently displayed in this rich narrative of the master builder, the killer, and the great fair that obsessed them both. Two men, each handsome and unusually adept at his chosen work, embodied an element of the great dynamic that characterized America's rush toward the twentieth century. The architect was Daniel Hudson Burnham, Erik Larson's gifts as a storyteller are magnificently displayed in this rich narrative of the master builder, the kil...

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Title:The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America
Author:Erik Larson
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Audio Cassette
Number of Pages:447 pages pages

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America Reviews

  • Jude
    Mar 30, 2007

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

    The White City is the Chicago Columbia Exposition, a world fair in which all the buildings were painted white; the time the late 1800s during the fair; the Devil is a serial killer. Yet this is a non-fiction book. Larson has written a very informative as well as entertaining story. The...

    For anyone who might question why I might give this a four-star rating rather than the six-star rating that its research deserves, it's because it's mostly a ton of facts, interesting or otherwise, and not quite the kind of coherent narrative a person might expect as a regular novel. ...

    This is a pretty famous book, but not one that's particularly been on my radar. But I was listening to my favorite podcast as of late, Lore, and there was an episode about this story, of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and H. H. Holmes the murderer who used the venue to lure in vulnerabl...

    Page Turning phenomenal! I took notes on my iphone to remind myself of 'gems' to 'share/write' about -- but there are 'at least' 2,000 'already' wonderful reviews --WELL DESERVING-- about this amazing TRUE STORY --I've not much more to add. The building of the Worlds Fair was f...

    My expectations were high for this book of popular history, but I wasn't disappointed. The Devil In The White City is an entertaining and informative look at Chicago?s 1893 World?s Fair, which despite many obstacles ? lack of time and money, natural disasters, a bad economy, p...

    The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America would probably rate 4 Stars for most but for me it got 5 White Stars on a black background. It rated higher because it taught me something about my hometown, which played a critical role in the 189...

    My daily life is filled with non-fiction: facts that are collected to give information quickly and easily to a reader. When I read for enjoyment, I usually gravitate toward fiction. I didn't realize this book was non-fiction when I bought it. I bought it because it came recommended...

  • Madeline
    Jun 12, 2013

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

  • Seth T.
    Sep 11, 2008

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

  • Maureen
    Jul 12, 2007

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

    The White City is the Chicago Columbia Exposition, a world fair in which all the buildings were painted white; the time the late 1800s during the fair; the Devil is a serial killer. Yet this is a non-fiction book. Larson has written a very informative as well as entertaining story. The...

    For anyone who might question why I might give this a four-star rating rather than the six-star rating that its research deserves, it's because it's mostly a ton of facts, interesting or otherwise, and not quite the kind of coherent narrative a person might expect as a regular novel. ...

    This is a pretty famous book, but not one that's particularly been on my radar. But I was listening to my favorite podcast as of late, Lore, and there was an episode about this story, of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and H. H. Holmes the murderer who used the venue to lure in vulnerabl...

    Page Turning phenomenal! I took notes on my iphone to remind myself of 'gems' to 'share/write' about -- but there are 'at least' 2,000 'already' wonderful reviews --WELL DESERVING-- about this amazing TRUE STORY --I've not much more to add. The building of the Worlds Fair was f...

    My expectations were high for this book of popular history, but I wasn't disappointed. The Devil In The White City is an entertaining and informative look at Chicago?s 1893 World?s Fair, which despite many obstacles ? lack of time and money, natural disasters, a bad economy, p...

    The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America would probably rate 4 Stars for most but for me it got 5 White Stars on a black background. It rated higher because it taught me something about my hometown, which played a critical role in the 189...

    My daily life is filled with non-fiction: facts that are collected to give information quickly and easily to a reader. When I read for enjoyment, I usually gravitate toward fiction. I didn't realize this book was non-fiction when I bought it. I bought it because it came recommended...

    I enjoyed Devil in the White City, particularly for the wealth of information (tons of great trivia!) in this novel-style nonfiction book. I probably would have appreciated it more, though, if I were from Chicago, a city planner or architect, or had a fascination with serial killers. ...

  • Kristy
    Aug 12, 2007

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

  • Mike
    Aug 06, 2011

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

    The White City is the Chicago Columbia Exposition, a world fair in which all the buildings were painted white; the time the late 1800s during the fair; the Devil is a serial killer. Yet this is a non-fiction book. Larson has written a very informative as well as entertaining story. The...

    For anyone who might question why I might give this a four-star rating rather than the six-star rating that its research deserves, it's because it's mostly a ton of facts, interesting or otherwise, and not quite the kind of coherent narrative a person might expect as a regular novel. ...

    This is a pretty famous book, but not one that's particularly been on my radar. But I was listening to my favorite podcast as of late, Lore, and there was an episode about this story, of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and H. H. Holmes the murderer who used the venue to lure in vulnerabl...

    Page Turning phenomenal! I took notes on my iphone to remind myself of 'gems' to 'share/write' about -- but there are 'at least' 2,000 'already' wonderful reviews --WELL DESERVING-- about this amazing TRUE STORY --I've not much more to add. The building of the Worlds Fair was f...

    My expectations were high for this book of popular history, but I wasn't disappointed. The Devil In The White City is an entertaining and informative look at Chicago?s 1893 World?s Fair, which despite many obstacles ? lack of time and money, natural disasters, a bad economy, p...

    The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America would probably rate 4 Stars for most but for me it got 5 White Stars on a black background. It rated higher because it taught me something about my hometown, which played a critical role in the 189...

  • Elyse
    Jul 29, 2014

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

    The White City is the Chicago Columbia Exposition, a world fair in which all the buildings were painted white; the time the late 1800s during the fair; the Devil is a serial killer. Yet this is a non-fiction book. Larson has written a very informative as well as entertaining story. The...

    For anyone who might question why I might give this a four-star rating rather than the six-star rating that its research deserves, it's because it's mostly a ton of facts, interesting or otherwise, and not quite the kind of coherent narrative a person might expect as a regular novel. ...

    This is a pretty famous book, but not one that's particularly been on my radar. But I was listening to my favorite podcast as of late, Lore, and there was an episode about this story, of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and H. H. Holmes the murderer who used the venue to lure in vulnerabl...

    Page Turning phenomenal! I took notes on my iphone to remind myself of 'gems' to 'share/write' about -- but there are 'at least' 2,000 'already' wonderful reviews --WELL DESERVING-- about this amazing TRUE STORY --I've not much more to add. The building of the Worlds Fair was f...

  • Danielle
    Aug 26, 2008

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

  • James
    Apr 02, 2008

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

  • Maxwell
    Nov 11, 2015

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

    The White City is the Chicago Columbia Exposition, a world fair in which all the buildings were painted white; the time the late 1800s during the fair; the Devil is a serial killer. Yet this is a non-fiction book. Larson has written a very informative as well as entertaining story. The...

    For anyone who might question why I might give this a four-star rating rather than the six-star rating that its research deserves, it's because it's mostly a ton of facts, interesting or otherwise, and not quite the kind of coherent narrative a person might expect as a regular novel. ...

    This is a pretty famous book, but not one that's particularly been on my radar. But I was listening to my favorite podcast as of late, Lore, and there was an episode about this story, of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and H. H. Holmes the murderer who used the venue to lure in vulnerabl...

  • Will Byrnes
    Sep 15, 2008

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

    The White City is the Chicago Columbia Exposition, a world fair in which all the buildings were painted white; the time the late 1800s during the fair; the Devil is a serial killer. Yet this is a non-fiction book. Larson has written a very informative as well as entertaining story. The...

  • Richard
    Jun 03, 2009

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

    The White City is the Chicago Columbia Exposition, a world fair in which all the buildings were painted white; the time the late 1800s during the fair; the Devil is a serial killer. Yet this is a non-fiction book. Larson has written a very informative as well as entertaining story. The...

    For anyone who might question why I might give this a four-star rating rather than the six-star rating that its research deserves, it's because it's mostly a ton of facts, interesting or otherwise, and not quite the kind of coherent narrative a person might expect as a regular novel. ...

    This is a pretty famous book, but not one that's particularly been on my radar. But I was listening to my favorite podcast as of late, Lore, and there was an episode about this story, of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and H. H. Holmes the murderer who used the venue to lure in vulnerabl...

    Page Turning phenomenal! I took notes on my iphone to remind myself of 'gems' to 'share/write' about -- but there are 'at least' 2,000 'already' wonderful reviews --WELL DESERVING-- about this amazing TRUE STORY --I've not much more to add. The building of the Worlds Fair was f...

    My expectations were high for this book of popular history, but I wasn't disappointed. The Devil In The White City is an entertaining and informative look at Chicago?s 1893 World?s Fair, which despite many obstacles ? lack of time and money, natural disasters, a bad economy, p...

    The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America would probably rate 4 Stars for most but for me it got 5 White Stars on a black background. It rated higher because it taught me something about my hometown, which played a critical role in the 189...

    My daily life is filled with non-fiction: facts that are collected to give information quickly and easily to a reader. When I read for enjoyment, I usually gravitate toward fiction. I didn't realize this book was non-fiction when I bought it. I bought it because it came recommended...

    I enjoyed Devil in the White City, particularly for the wealth of information (tons of great trivia!) in this novel-style nonfiction book. I probably would have appreciated it more, though, if I were from Chicago, a city planner or architect, or had a fascination with serial killers. ...

    The Devil in the White City is a book about the White City ? the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, and a book about a devil ? a psychopathic serial killer. I enjoyed both books here, but wasn't pleased with the author's decision to try to integrate them into one book. If they had be...

  • Victoria Schwab
    Apr 30, 2016

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

  • Jason Koivu
    Nov 04, 2011

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

  • Lobstergirl
    Jun 02, 2010

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

  • Dem
    Mar 10, 2017

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

  • Bradley
    Jun 27, 2017

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

    The White City is the Chicago Columbia Exposition, a world fair in which all the buildings were painted white; the time the late 1800s during the fair; the Devil is a serial killer. Yet this is a non-fiction book. Larson has written a very informative as well as entertaining story. The...

    For anyone who might question why I might give this a four-star rating rather than the six-star rating that its research deserves, it's because it's mostly a ton of facts, interesting or otherwise, and not quite the kind of coherent narrative a person might expect as a regular novel. ...

  • Jason
    Jul 28, 2011

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

  • Henry Avila
    Mar 25, 2016

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

  • Jim Fonseca
    Feb 07, 2016

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

  • Carol
    Jun 08, 2015

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

  • Celeste
    Nov 29, 2016

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

    The White City is the Chicago Columbia Exposition, a world fair in which all the buildings were painted white; the time the late 1800s during the fair; the Devil is a serial killer. Yet this is a non-fiction book. Larson has written a very informative as well as entertaining story. The...

    For anyone who might question why I might give this a four-star rating rather than the six-star rating that its research deserves, it's because it's mostly a ton of facts, interesting or otherwise, and not quite the kind of coherent narrative a person might expect as a regular novel. ...

    This is a pretty famous book, but not one that's particularly been on my radar. But I was listening to my favorite podcast as of late, Lore, and there was an episode about this story, of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and H. H. Holmes the murderer who used the venue to lure in vulnerabl...

    Page Turning phenomenal! I took notes on my iphone to remind myself of 'gems' to 'share/write' about -- but there are 'at least' 2,000 'already' wonderful reviews --WELL DESERVING-- about this amazing TRUE STORY --I've not much more to add. The building of the Worlds Fair was f...

    My expectations were high for this book of popular history, but I wasn't disappointed. The Devil In The White City is an entertaining and informative look at Chicago?s 1893 World?s Fair, which despite many obstacles ? lack of time and money, natural disasters, a bad economy, p...

    The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America would probably rate 4 Stars for most but for me it got 5 White Stars on a black background. It rated higher because it taught me something about my hometown, which played a critical role in the 189...

    My daily life is filled with non-fiction: facts that are collected to give information quickly and easily to a reader. When I read for enjoyment, I usually gravitate toward fiction. I didn't realize this book was non-fiction when I bought it. I bought it because it came recommended...

    I enjoyed Devil in the White City, particularly for the wealth of information (tons of great trivia!) in this novel-style nonfiction book. I probably would have appreciated it more, though, if I were from Chicago, a city planner or architect, or had a fascination with serial killers. ...

    The Devil in the White City is a book about the White City ? the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, and a book about a devil ? a psychopathic serial killer. I enjoyed both books here, but wasn't pleased with the author's decision to try to integrate them into one book. If they had be...

    Full review now posted below! Every time I hesitantly open a non-fiction book I think, ?Maybe this time. Maybe I won?t hate this one.? And every time, I?m wrong. On the one hand, since History is one half of my dual B.A. Degree, I find the material interesting and respect th...

  • Laura
    Jun 29, 2016

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

    The White City is the Chicago Columbia Exposition, a world fair in which all the buildings were painted white; the time the late 1800s during the fair; the Devil is a serial killer. Yet this is a non-fiction book. Larson has written a very informative as well as entertaining story. The...

    For anyone who might question why I might give this a four-star rating rather than the six-star rating that its research deserves, it's because it's mostly a ton of facts, interesting or otherwise, and not quite the kind of coherent narrative a person might expect as a regular novel. ...

    This is a pretty famous book, but not one that's particularly been on my radar. But I was listening to my favorite podcast as of late, Lore, and there was an episode about this story, of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and H. H. Holmes the murderer who used the venue to lure in vulnerabl...

    Page Turning phenomenal! I took notes on my iphone to remind myself of 'gems' to 'share/write' about -- but there are 'at least' 2,000 'already' wonderful reviews --WELL DESERVING-- about this amazing TRUE STORY --I've not much more to add. The building of the Worlds Fair was f...

    My expectations were high for this book of popular history, but I wasn't disappointed. The Devil In The White City is an entertaining and informative look at Chicago?s 1893 World?s Fair, which despite many obstacles ? lack of time and money, natural disasters, a bad economy, p...

    The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America would probably rate 4 Stars for most but for me it got 5 White Stars on a black background. It rated higher because it taught me something about my hometown, which played a critical role in the 189...

    My daily life is filled with non-fiction: facts that are collected to give information quickly and easily to a reader. When I read for enjoyment, I usually gravitate toward fiction. I didn't realize this book was non-fiction when I bought it. I bought it because it came recommended...

    I enjoyed Devil in the White City, particularly for the wealth of information (tons of great trivia!) in this novel-style nonfiction book. I probably would have appreciated it more, though, if I were from Chicago, a city planner or architect, or had a fascination with serial killers. ...

    The Devil in the White City is a book about the White City ? the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, and a book about a devil ? a psychopathic serial killer. I enjoyed both books here, but wasn't pleased with the author's decision to try to integrate them into one book. If they had be...

    Full review now posted below! Every time I hesitantly open a non-fiction book I think, ?Maybe this time. Maybe I won?t hate this one.? And every time, I?m wrong. On the one hand, since History is one half of my dual B.A. Degree, I find the material interesting and respect th...

    Overwhelmingly underwhelming This reads like two separate books spliced together at inopportune moments - as soon one half got the least bit exciting, we'd swap. There's too high of a disconnect between these two sides - on the one hand we have the World's Fair in 1893 and on the o...

    I'm the first reader to say that I'm not a huge nonfiction fan. I have read a little but mostly it included memoirs or young adult (daughters assigned readings). I mostly let the hubby do the heavy lifting (reading nonfiction) and he tells me the interesting parts. So, without further ...

  • Carol
    Feb 02, 2013

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

  • David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party
    Feb 12, 2017

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

  • Mizuki
    Jun 01, 2017

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

  • Jaidee
    Nov 04, 2013

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

  • Glenn Sumi
    Jan 22, 2015

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

    The White City is the Chicago Columbia Exposition, a world fair in which all the buildings were painted white; the time the late 1800s during the fair; the Devil is a serial killer. Yet this is a non-fiction book. Larson has written a very informative as well as entertaining story. The...

    For anyone who might question why I might give this a four-star rating rather than the six-star rating that its research deserves, it's because it's mostly a ton of facts, interesting or otherwise, and not quite the kind of coherent narrative a person might expect as a regular novel. ...

    This is a pretty famous book, but not one that's particularly been on my radar. But I was listening to my favorite podcast as of late, Lore, and there was an episode about this story, of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and H. H. Holmes the murderer who used the venue to lure in vulnerabl...

    Page Turning phenomenal! I took notes on my iphone to remind myself of 'gems' to 'share/write' about -- but there are 'at least' 2,000 'already' wonderful reviews --WELL DESERVING-- about this amazing TRUE STORY --I've not much more to add. The building of the Worlds Fair was f...

    My expectations were high for this book of popular history, but I wasn't disappointed. The Devil In The White City is an entertaining and informative look at Chicago?s 1893 World?s Fair, which despite many obstacles ? lack of time and money, natural disasters, a bad economy, p...

  • Jonathan Ashleigh
    Nov 10, 2015

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

  • Miranda Reads
    Nov 11, 2017

    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...

    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...

    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...

    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...

    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...

    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...

    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...

    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...

    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...

    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...

    This is really a great read filled with meticulously researched historical facts and notable people of the time. Even Helen Keller made an appearance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair! Alternating chapters educate the reader about the enormous undertaking and time constraints of buildin...

    Extremely well written and researched, unsettling, entertaining, educational and fascinating are all words that come to mind on finishing Eric Larson's book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 was ...

    Utterly compelling. ...

    Ohhhh, this book is creeeeeepy and all-true!!! Being from Chicago I was in an awful thrall the entire time. The only thing that was missing for me would have been some kind of map to show where exactly the Fair was located, and all the other buildings he talks about... I think the fair...

    Pre-review: ?I was born with the devil in me,' [Holmes] wrote. 'I could not help the fact that I was a murderer, no more than the poet can help the inspiration to sing.? Damn, it is exactly my type of thing! *jumps to read* Actual review starts here: Note: Buddy-read...

    The Devil in the White City is one of those enticing little books in which you know what you're going to get, yet you read it anyway, and it delivers all the salacious excitement you desired...you filthy degenerate, you! Amid of all the magnificence and enchantment of the 1893 Chica...

    Excellent history lesson!! This book captured my attention from page 1. I enjoyed reading about many of the influential people who made this great nation what it is today. I learned so much more than when I was a student. On the flip side, I was horrified by the murders committed by...

    3 "fascinating but somehow lacking" stars 2015 Most Average of Average Award Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. This was history made accessible but almost too accessible and readable to the detriment of depth and perhaps some additional analysis. This is a...

    The White City is the Chicago Columbia Exposition, a world fair in which all the buildings were painted white; the time the late 1800s during the fair; the Devil is a serial killer. Yet this is a non-fiction book. Larson has written a very informative as well as entertaining story. The...

    For anyone who might question why I might give this a four-star rating rather than the six-star rating that its research deserves, it's because it's mostly a ton of facts, interesting or otherwise, and not quite the kind of coherent narrative a person might expect as a regular novel. ...

    This is a pretty famous book, but not one that's particularly been on my radar. But I was listening to my favorite podcast as of late, Lore, and there was an episode about this story, of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and H. H. Holmes the murderer who used the venue to lure in vulnerabl...

    Page Turning phenomenal! I took notes on my iphone to remind myself of 'gems' to 'share/write' about -- but there are 'at least' 2,000 'already' wonderful reviews --WELL DESERVING-- about this amazing TRUE STORY --I've not much more to add. The building of the Worlds Fair was f...

    My expectations were high for this book of popular history, but I wasn't disappointed. The Devil In The White City is an entertaining and informative look at Chicago?s 1893 World?s Fair, which despite many obstacles ? lack of time and money, natural disasters, a bad economy, p...

    The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America would probably rate 4 Stars for most but for me it got 5 White Stars on a black background. It rated higher because it taught me something about my hometown, which played a critical role in the 189...

    My daily life is filled with non-fiction: facts that are collected to give information quickly and easily to a reader. When I read for enjoyment, I usually gravitate toward fiction. I didn't realize this book was non-fiction when I bought it. I bought it because it came recommended...

    I enjoyed Devil in the White City, particularly for the wealth of information (tons of great trivia!) in this novel-style nonfiction book. I probably would have appreciated it more, though, if I were from Chicago, a city planner or architect, or had a fascination with serial killers. ...

    The Devil in the White City is a book about the White City ? the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, and a book about a devil ? a psychopathic serial killer. I enjoyed both books here, but wasn't pleased with the author's decision to try to integrate them into one book. If they had be...

    Full review now posted below! Every time I hesitantly open a non-fiction book I think, ?Maybe this time. Maybe I won?t hate this one.? And every time, I?m wrong. On the one hand, since History is one half of my dual B.A. Degree, I find the material interesting and respect th...

    Overwhelmingly underwhelming This reads like two separate books spliced together at inopportune moments - as soon one half got the least bit exciting, we'd swap. There's too high of a disconnect between these two sides - on the one hand we have the World's Fair in 1893 and on the o...