Commander in Chief: FDR's Battle with Churchill, 1943

Commander in Chief: FDR's Battle with Churchill, 1943

In the next installment of the "splendid memoir Roosevelt didn't get to write" (New York Times), Nigel Hamilton tells the astonishing story of FDR's year-long, defining battle with Churchill, as the war raged in Africa and Italy. Nigel Hamilton's Mantle of Command, long-listed for the National Book Award, drew on years of archival research and interviews to portray FDR in a In the next installment of the "splendid memoir Roosevelt didn't get to write" (New York Times), Nigel Hamilton tells...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Commander in Chief: FDR's Battle with Churchill, 1943
Author:Nigel Hamilton
Rating:
Genres:History
ISBN:0544279115
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:480 pages pages

Commander in Chief: FDR's Battle with Churchill, 1943 Reviews

  • P
    Aug 11, 2017

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

  • Matt
    Feb 04, 2019

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

  • Terry
    Jun 26, 2019

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

  • Joan
    Feb 26, 2017

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

  • Paul Myers
    Jun 17, 2018

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

    Enthralling - sets the record straight on FDR's contribution to the winning of WWII. ...

    Nigel Hamilton's 2nd volume on FDR's WWII leadership is superb. Commander In Chief shows it was FDR not Churchill who understood the need for a second front in France. ...

    Strategy and personality Hamilton traces the overall strategy to win a comples global war to FDR and link winning the war to winning the peace. ...

  • John
    Sep 12, 2017

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

  • Marshall
    Aug 27, 2017

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

  • Urey Patrick
    Sep 06, 2019

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

  • Christopher
    Jun 01, 2016

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

  • David
    Aug 13, 2016

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

    Enthralling - sets the record straight on FDR's contribution to the winning of WWII. ...

    Nigel Hamilton's 2nd volume on FDR's WWII leadership is superb. Commander In Chief shows it was FDR not Churchill who understood the need for a second front in France. ...

    Strategy and personality Hamilton traces the overall strategy to win a comples global war to FDR and link winning the war to winning the peace. ...

    Excellent. Eager for the third volume. ...

    Well worth the read! ...

    Simply excellent It was a fascinating read - loaded with facts , we get the actual story on the execution of allied forces in the European theater. ...

    Given our current situation, this book makes you want to cry. The poise, paitence, and leadership that FDR demonstrated during this critical time was amazing and sorely missed. ...

    This is a riveting account of Franklin Roosevelt's handling of American and Allied strategies during the course of 1943. That year was a pivotal and critical one for U.S. forces. It began with Operation Torch having just begun with the invasion of North Africa by green U.S. troops. Thi...

    Dr Hamilton has written an incisive and compelling book about the politics of fighting World War II, with the primary focus on President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill, with much detail about Gen. Alan Brook, Gen George Marshall, Marshall Josef Stalin and many other leading fig...

  • Melissa
    Jan 29, 2019

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

    Enthralling - sets the record straight on FDR's contribution to the winning of WWII. ...

    Nigel Hamilton's 2nd volume on FDR's WWII leadership is superb. Commander In Chief shows it was FDR not Churchill who understood the need for a second front in France. ...

    Strategy and personality Hamilton traces the overall strategy to win a comples global war to FDR and link winning the war to winning the peace. ...

    Excellent. Eager for the third volume. ...

    Well worth the read! ...

    Simply excellent It was a fascinating read - loaded with facts , we get the actual story on the execution of allied forces in the European theater. ...

    Given our current situation, this book makes you want to cry. The poise, paitence, and leadership that FDR demonstrated during this critical time was amazing and sorely missed. ...

  • John
    Apr 28, 2018

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

  • Scott
    Jun 01, 2016

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

  • Gwen
    Dec 15, 2016

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

    Enthralling - sets the record straight on FDR's contribution to the winning of WWII. ...

    Nigel Hamilton's 2nd volume on FDR's WWII leadership is superb. Commander In Chief shows it was FDR not Churchill who understood the need for a second front in France. ...

    Strategy and personality Hamilton traces the overall strategy to win a comples global war to FDR and link winning the war to winning the peace. ...

    Excellent. Eager for the third volume. ...

    Well worth the read! ...

    Simply excellent It was a fascinating read - loaded with facts , we get the actual story on the execution of allied forces in the European theater. ...

    Given our current situation, this book makes you want to cry. The poise, paitence, and leadership that FDR demonstrated during this critical time was amazing and sorely missed. ...

    This is a riveting account of Franklin Roosevelt's handling of American and Allied strategies during the course of 1943. That year was a pivotal and critical one for U.S. forces. It began with Operation Torch having just begun with the invasion of North Africa by green U.S. troops. Thi...

    Dr Hamilton has written an incisive and compelling book about the politics of fighting World War II, with the primary focus on President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill, with much detail about Gen. Alan Brook, Gen George Marshall, Marshall Josef Stalin and many other leading fig...

    Volume II of Nigel Hamilton's wartime history of FDR as wartime commander in chief of the West. Volume II covers 1943. Using many documents recently declassifed in a flurry in 2010 and documents for FDR's map room files within the White House, the picture appears of an FDR much more at...

    Captivating, behind the scenes story of the run up to D-day. Nigel Hamilton portrays the strength, vision and fortitude that FDR exhibited in his role as the Allies WWII Commander in Chief. Hamilton brings FDR out of Churchill's shadow yet at the same time a key lesson of the book is h...

  • Jim Cooper
    Aug 17, 2018

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

  • Edgar Raines
    Jun 30, 2016

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

  • Paul Duggan
    Oct 18, 2016

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

    Enthralling - sets the record straight on FDR's contribution to the winning of WWII. ...

    Nigel Hamilton's 2nd volume on FDR's WWII leadership is superb. Commander In Chief shows it was FDR not Churchill who understood the need for a second front in France. ...

    Strategy and personality Hamilton traces the overall strategy to win a comples global war to FDR and link winning the war to winning the peace. ...

    Excellent. Eager for the third volume. ...

    Well worth the read! ...

    Simply excellent It was a fascinating read - loaded with facts , we get the actual story on the execution of allied forces in the European theater. ...

    Given our current situation, this book makes you want to cry. The poise, paitence, and leadership that FDR demonstrated during this critical time was amazing and sorely missed. ...

    This is a riveting account of Franklin Roosevelt's handling of American and Allied strategies during the course of 1943. That year was a pivotal and critical one for U.S. forces. It began with Operation Torch having just begun with the invasion of North Africa by green U.S. troops. Thi...

    Dr Hamilton has written an incisive and compelling book about the politics of fighting World War II, with the primary focus on President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill, with much detail about Gen. Alan Brook, Gen George Marshall, Marshall Josef Stalin and many other leading fig...

    Volume II of Nigel Hamilton's wartime history of FDR as wartime commander in chief of the West. Volume II covers 1943. Using many documents recently declassifed in a flurry in 2010 and documents for FDR's map room files within the White House, the picture appears of an FDR much more at...

    Captivating, behind the scenes story of the run up to D-day. Nigel Hamilton portrays the strength, vision and fortitude that FDR exhibited in his role as the Allies WWII Commander in Chief. Hamilton brings FDR out of Churchill's shadow yet at the same time a key lesson of the book is h...

    Revisionist history at its best although this narrative badly needed a capable editor. There are so many homonym errors - lynchpin for linchpin, dabauche for debouche - it's as if Hamilton dictated the text for later word processing entry. Nonetheless, this is a very good book ex...

  • Gerry Connolly
    Aug 06, 2017

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

    Enthralling - sets the record straight on FDR's contribution to the winning of WWII. ...

    Nigel Hamilton's 2nd volume on FDR's WWII leadership is superb. Commander In Chief shows it was FDR not Churchill who understood the need for a second front in France. ...

  • Robert Sparrenberger
    Jan 03, 2018

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

  • Roger Taylor
    Jun 30, 2017

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

  • Jim
    Jul 24, 2016

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

    Enthralling - sets the record straight on FDR's contribution to the winning of WWII. ...

    Nigel Hamilton's 2nd volume on FDR's WWII leadership is superb. Commander In Chief shows it was FDR not Churchill who understood the need for a second front in France. ...

    Strategy and personality Hamilton traces the overall strategy to win a comples global war to FDR and link winning the war to winning the peace. ...

    Excellent. Eager for the third volume. ...

    Well worth the read! ...

    Simply excellent It was a fascinating read - loaded with facts , we get the actual story on the execution of allied forces in the European theater. ...

    Given our current situation, this book makes you want to cry. The poise, paitence, and leadership that FDR demonstrated during this critical time was amazing and sorely missed. ...

    This is a riveting account of Franklin Roosevelt's handling of American and Allied strategies during the course of 1943. That year was a pivotal and critical one for U.S. forces. It began with Operation Torch having just begun with the invasion of North Africa by green U.S. troops. Thi...

  • Sekhar N Banerjee
    Jan 12, 2019

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

    Enthralling - sets the record straight on FDR's contribution to the winning of WWII. ...

    Nigel Hamilton's 2nd volume on FDR's WWII leadership is superb. Commander In Chief shows it was FDR not Churchill who understood the need for a second front in France. ...

    Strategy and personality Hamilton traces the overall strategy to win a comples global war to FDR and link winning the war to winning the peace. ...

    Excellent. Eager for the third volume. ...

    Well worth the read! ...

    Simply excellent It was a fascinating read - loaded with facts , we get the actual story on the execution of allied forces in the European theater. ...

  • Roy Beckemeyer
    Jul 10, 2019

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

    Enthralling - sets the record straight on FDR's contribution to the winning of WWII. ...

  • Ian Divertie
    Jan 29, 2017

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

    Enthralling - sets the record straight on FDR's contribution to the winning of WWII. ...

    Nigel Hamilton's 2nd volume on FDR's WWII leadership is superb. Commander In Chief shows it was FDR not Churchill who understood the need for a second front in France. ...

    Strategy and personality Hamilton traces the overall strategy to win a comples global war to FDR and link winning the war to winning the peace. ...

    Excellent. Eager for the third volume. ...

    Well worth the read! ...

    Simply excellent It was a fascinating read - loaded with facts , we get the actual story on the execution of allied forces in the European theater. ...

    Given our current situation, this book makes you want to cry. The poise, paitence, and leadership that FDR demonstrated during this critical time was amazing and sorely missed. ...

    This is a riveting account of Franklin Roosevelt's handling of American and Allied strategies during the course of 1943. That year was a pivotal and critical one for U.S. forces. It began with Operation Torch having just begun with the invasion of North Africa by green U.S. troops. Thi...

    Dr Hamilton has written an incisive and compelling book about the politics of fighting World War II, with the primary focus on President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill, with much detail about Gen. Alan Brook, Gen George Marshall, Marshall Josef Stalin and many other leading fig...

    Volume II of Nigel Hamilton's wartime history of FDR as wartime commander in chief of the West. Volume II covers 1943. Using many documents recently declassifed in a flurry in 2010 and documents for FDR's map room files within the White House, the picture appears of an FDR much more at...

  • Kathleen
    Jun 30, 2017

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

  • Roger Rosenberg
    Jun 30, 2017

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

    Enthralling - sets the record straight on FDR's contribution to the winning of WWII. ...

    Nigel Hamilton's 2nd volume on FDR's WWII leadership is superb. Commander In Chief shows it was FDR not Churchill who understood the need for a second front in France. ...

    Strategy and personality Hamilton traces the overall strategy to win a comples global war to FDR and link winning the war to winning the peace. ...

    Excellent. Eager for the third volume. ...

  • Mary
    Jul 27, 2019

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

  • Stephen Ruch
    Aug 21, 2018

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

  • M Tucker
    Mar 08, 2018

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

  • D.  McFarlane
    Aug 17, 2019

    ?There is a longing in the air. It is not a longing to go back to what they call ?the good old days.? I have distinct reservations as to how good ?the good old days? were. I would rather believe that we can achieve new and better days. Absolute victory in this war will give g...

    Shoutout to William Lyon Mackenzie King! The 10th Prime Minister of Canada made this book possible with his dedicated journals of his war-time conversations with Churchill and FDR (they both trusted him implicitly). Because FDR died before he had a chance to write his version of eve...

    Certain topics seem like they have been sufficiently covered, and the American role in World War II would seem to be one of them, as is the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The books that have been written on these topics can be measured in metric tons or by the millions of pag...

    Nearly 75 years after WWII has ended; Hamilton presents a compelling case that Roosevelt not only was fighting the Axis powers, but also his key partner, Winston Churchill. Churchill was determined to maintain the British Empire which affected his overall strategic vision of how to con...

    This is a very readable account restoring FDR to his central place in directing the American war effort. It is at times too dismissive of those who disagreed with FDR and at times the writing could be tighter. This is the second volume in a projected three-volume study of FDR as wartim...

    One of the best books of history I have read in recent years was Nigel Hamilton's The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941?1942. It did much to challenge the old narrative that FDR was, mostly, a hands-off commander-in-chief who gave some direction to the military, but left them to d...

    An excellent follow up to Hamilton's previous book. I think he might overstate the case against Churchill, but not by much. Churchill's problem was that he lacked a team of subordinates who could argue or contest certain tactical approaches to the Prime Minister's strategic insights. C...

    In this, the second of his three volume history of Franklin Roosevelt?s wartime leadership, Hamilton continues his fawning treatment of FDR and his rather demeaning treatment of everybody else that was so evident in the first volume ?The Mantle of Command.? Hamilton presents FDR ...

    DNF. Dry but seemed well researched. ...

    This is the second volume of Nigel Hamilton?s series on ?FDR at War? and it is a gem. In this series of volumes the author has embarked on a mission to present Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief and to tell the story of how he directed when and where the war would be fought...

    This second volume of Hamilton's FDR trilogy is definitely a step up from the first. His prose is more balanced and less fawning toward FDR. I did feel, however (and maybe I am wrong), that some portions seemed repetitive. I liked that he drew upon MacKenzie King's notes as a contempor...

    As someone who grew up in the post wwii world, it is always assumed that the United States and Britain defeated the nazis and sailed into the sunset. This book points out the difference between Churchill and Roosevelt as to the execution of the war and where it would be fought. The...

    An excellent study of the relationship between FDR and Churchill during the critical year 1943 when important decisions were being made about the timing of the cross channel invasion and the conduct of the campaign in the Mediterranean. While it does seem somewhat biased towards FDR an...

    I am a huge historical non-fiction fan and this did not disappoint. The book's details are enhanced due to the Author taking much of the backstory directly from the notes and diaries of both FDR's and Churchill's relatives, secretaries, aides and Generals. I learned a great deal of ins...

    A good read, just not as great as the first volume. I suspect the author had enough information for a good two volumes and he used some of this book as filler. It's a good look at FDR as war leader, but it does become kind of boring the second half of the book. Still provides a good lo...

    Well researched sequel to Mantle of Command. I think the first book was a little beefier but perhaps it's just that the first book always seems better. I would recommend reading the previous book first just to get the tone, but it is not absolutely necessary. They are definitely stand ...

    With hundreds of books written about FDR, and thousands about WWII, Hamilton reveals the real challenges and triumphs of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander in Chief of the free nations of the Western Alliance. Superb history. ...

    I really learned a lot and enjoyed the differences between FDR's story and Churchill's, very telling of their personalities and their different priorities and visions of the future. ...

    Enthralling - sets the record straight on FDR's contribution to the winning of WWII. ...

    Nigel Hamilton's 2nd volume on FDR's WWII leadership is superb. Commander In Chief shows it was FDR not Churchill who understood the need for a second front in France. ...

    Strategy and personality Hamilton traces the overall strategy to win a comples global war to FDR and link winning the war to winning the peace. ...

    Excellent. Eager for the third volume. ...

    Well worth the read! ...