Utopia Drive: A Road Trip Through America's Most Radical Idea

Utopia Drive: A Road Trip Through America's Most Radical Idea

For Erik Reece, life, at last, was good: he was newly married, gainfully employed, living in a creekside cabin in his beloved Kentucky woods. It sounded, as he describes it, "like a country song with a happy ending." And yet he was still haunted by a sense that the world--or, more specifically, his country--could be better. He couldn't ignore his conviction that, in fact, For Erik Reece, life, at last, was good: he was newly married, gainfully employed, living in a creekside cabin in his belo...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Utopia Drive: A Road Trip Through America's Most Radical Idea
Author:Erik Reece
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0374106576
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:368 pages pages

Utopia Drive: A Road Trip Through America's Most Radical Idea Reviews

  • Kelly Brown
    Aug 25, 2019

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

    I feel that marketing this book as a 'road trip' is a little misleading. The author does indeed report travelling around the sites of the utopian communities he discusses, but since most of them are no longer active, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of their past personali...

    Uneven. He's at his best when visiting the sites of these "utopian" communities, describing and explaining their histories, philosophies, trajectories and - in most cases - failures. He's also very good when interviewing the people still actively involved in one way or another with the...

    8/26/16 ...

    A bit long and too pedantic. Why am I attracted to books like this? ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Jeff Raymond
    Jul 21, 2017

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

  • Bethanne
    Oct 07, 2016

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

    I feel that marketing this book as a 'road trip' is a little misleading. The author does indeed report travelling around the sites of the utopian communities he discusses, but since most of them are no longer active, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of their past personali...

    Uneven. He's at his best when visiting the sites of these "utopian" communities, describing and explaining their histories, philosophies, trajectories and - in most cases - failures. He's also very good when interviewing the people still actively involved in one way or another with the...

    8/26/16 ...

  • Erica
    Oct 03, 2018

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

  • Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance
    Feb 17, 2017

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

  • Nicky
    Feb 28, 2017

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

  • Janice
    Aug 23, 2016

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

  • Kristina
    Jul 22, 2019

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

  • Christopher
    Feb 23, 2017

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

  • Brad
    Dec 17, 2018

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

  • Kim
    Oct 10, 2016

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

    I feel that marketing this book as a 'road trip' is a little misleading. The author does indeed report travelling around the sites of the utopian communities he discusses, but since most of them are no longer active, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of their past personali...

    Uneven. He's at his best when visiting the sites of these "utopian" communities, describing and explaining their histories, philosophies, trajectories and - in most cases - failures. He's also very good when interviewing the people still actively involved in one way or another with the...

    8/26/16 ...

    A bit long and too pedantic. Why am I attracted to books like this? ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Kyle Nicholas
    Oct 19, 2016

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

    I feel that marketing this book as a 'road trip' is a little misleading. The author does indeed report travelling around the sites of the utopian communities he discusses, but since most of them are no longer active, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of their past personali...

    Uneven. He's at his best when visiting the sites of these "utopian" communities, describing and explaining their histories, philosophies, trajectories and - in most cases - failures. He's also very good when interviewing the people still actively involved in one way or another with the...

    8/26/16 ...

    A bit long and too pedantic. Why am I attracted to books like this? ...

  • Julie Gilchrist
    Mar 24, 2017

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

  • Svetlana
    Jan 03, 2017

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

    I feel that marketing this book as a 'road trip' is a little misleading. The author does indeed report travelling around the sites of the utopian communities he discusses, but since most of them are no longer active, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of their past personali...

    Uneven. He's at his best when visiting the sites of these "utopian" communities, describing and explaining their histories, philosophies, trajectories and - in most cases - failures. He's also very good when interviewing the people still actively involved in one way or another with the...

    8/26/16 ...

    A bit long and too pedantic. Why am I attracted to books like this? ...

    ...

    ...

  • Misteeyed
    Jul 29, 2017

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

  • Joseph
    Jul 02, 2018

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

  • Scotty
    May 01, 2019

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

    I feel that marketing this book as a 'road trip' is a little misleading. The author does indeed report travelling around the sites of the utopian communities he discusses, but since most of them are no longer active, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of their past personali...

    Uneven. He's at his best when visiting the sites of these "utopian" communities, describing and explaining their histories, philosophies, trajectories and - in most cases - failures. He's also very good when interviewing the people still actively involved in one way or another with the...

    8/26/16 ...

    A bit long and too pedantic. Why am I attracted to books like this? ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Andrea
    Sep 14, 2017

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

    I feel that marketing this book as a 'road trip' is a little misleading. The author does indeed report travelling around the sites of the utopian communities he discusses, but since most of them are no longer active, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of their past personali...

    Uneven. He's at his best when visiting the sites of these "utopian" communities, describing and explaining their histories, philosophies, trajectories and - in most cases - failures. He's also very good when interviewing the people still actively involved in one way or another with the...

    8/26/16 ...

    A bit long and too pedantic. Why am I attracted to books like this? ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Casey
    Sep 11, 2016

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

  • Gold Dust
    Aug 08, 2018

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

  • Brad Masi
    Oct 12, 2016

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

    I feel that marketing this book as a 'road trip' is a little misleading. The author does indeed report travelling around the sites of the utopian communities he discusses, but since most of them are no longer active, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of their past personali...

    Uneven. He's at his best when visiting the sites of these "utopian" communities, describing and explaining their histories, philosophies, trajectories and - in most cases - failures. He's also very good when interviewing the people still actively involved in one way or another with the...

    8/26/16 ...

    A bit long and too pedantic. Why am I attracted to books like this? ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Anthony Faber
    Mar 07, 2017

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

  • Mark Hoffman
    Jul 04, 2017

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

  • Rob Wipfler
    Jun 02, 2017

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

  • Emma
    Feb 26, 2018

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

    I feel that marketing this book as a 'road trip' is a little misleading. The author does indeed report travelling around the sites of the utopian communities he discusses, but since most of them are no longer active, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of their past personali...

    Uneven. He's at his best when visiting the sites of these "utopian" communities, describing and explaining their histories, philosophies, trajectories and - in most cases - failures. He's also very good when interviewing the people still actively involved in one way or another with the...

    8/26/16 ...

    A bit long and too pedantic. Why am I attracted to books like this? ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Sheri Howard
    Jul 07, 2019

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

  • Will A
    Aug 22, 2016

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

    I feel that marketing this book as a 'road trip' is a little misleading. The author does indeed report travelling around the sites of the utopian communities he discusses, but since most of them are no longer active, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of their past personali...

  • Chasity Moore
    Sep 26, 2016

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

    I feel that marketing this book as a 'road trip' is a little misleading. The author does indeed report travelling around the sites of the utopian communities he discusses, but since most of them are no longer active, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of their past personali...

    Uneven. He's at his best when visiting the sites of these "utopian" communities, describing and explaining their histories, philosophies, trajectories and - in most cases - failures. He's also very good when interviewing the people still actively involved in one way or another with the...

    8/26/16 ...

    A bit long and too pedantic. Why am I attracted to books like this? ...

    ...

  • Julie Stielstra
    Nov 15, 2016

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...

    Interesting ...

    This isn't exactly a page turner, but it's definitely very, VERY interesting!! ...

    Interesting look at some Eastern U.S. utopian communities in the first half of the Nineteenth Century. ...

    This was a book I happened upon when I was picking up another one at my local library, and I was not at all disappointed. Reece has an excellent writing style that reveals the depth of his investment and effort in this project without making it read like a research report. Equal parts ...

    I feel that marketing this book as a 'road trip' is a little misleading. The author does indeed report travelling around the sites of the utopian communities he discusses, but since most of them are no longer active, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of their past personali...

    Uneven. He's at his best when visiting the sites of these "utopian" communities, describing and explaining their histories, philosophies, trajectories and - in most cases - failures. He's also very good when interviewing the people still actively involved in one way or another with the...

  • Logan Streondj
    May 23, 2019

    I've always been completely fascinated with utopias, and I've secretly longed to join one or start one. I'm a natural reader for this little travel narrative then, as the author takes us on a road trip (a small one) through all the utopias and former utopias that are or were located cl...

    Loved this road trip review about American's utopian communities. If you don't have the time to read the entire book make sure you DO make time to read the last chapter, titled "What If?" In fact you should read it twice. But I recommend the entire book, lots to think about at this tim...

    Utopia Drive reads like a podcast I'd love to listen to. The conceit is fairly basic, where a writer is visiting a series of historically Utopian villages and communes in the United States over a period of time, giving a bit of history as well as present-day affairs in many cases, ...

    The grim state of our nation/ daimon/ break the trance/ yarrow, tansy, wormwood and lavender/ the atheneum/ revelations 12:6/ there's nothing like a dream to create the future/ a peaceable revolution/ exponential growth/ war machine economists/ what I have is better than what you have/...

    I love the premise of this book, a road trip in search of utopian communities in the US. The book starts in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, famous home of a Shaker community that produced simple yet beautiful furniture and buildings. Another stop was Robert Owen's New Harmony, Indiana, home o...

    Doesn't live up to the hype. My sense in reading this facile histoy of messianic groups in 19th century America trying to build heaven on earth was that the author wanted to write off the cost of a road trip vacation as a tax dedication against a book advance. There is an anecdote ...

    An important book to read about past attempts to form utopian communities early in America's history. Some of those utopias even still exist today. I only wish that the book included pictures of the communities or their founders, and that the book included chapters on Brook Farm and th...

    Listened to 11 out of 13 hours of the audiobook, and tired of it. Author is so annoying. I finally got sick of all of the flowery prose. The last couple of hours I listened, I could only think of the section of The Milagro Beanfield War when one of Bloom's articles with amateur psycho...

    This was much more than a road trip novel. I feel like Reece spent most of his time giving the very interesting history of different attempts of creating utopias in the eastern U.S. Besides just being an interesting topic, I felt like it also served as a genealogy of leftist politics i...

    Fascinating! A road trip through past and present utopias from Kentucky to New York highlighting that we still need Utopian thinking for another way forward. The last chapter "What If" offers current, compelling examples of models that solve the problems of income inequality. ...

    Approachable survey of 19th-Century utopian societies with a brief look at contemporary efforts to build equitable societies. ...

    An important study, made even more crucial as the current administration appears hellbent on creating a dystopian future. ...

    Some interesting ideas presented in a less-than-interesting way. The last chapter (What If?) was the best part?I?d give it at least four stars. ...

    A good narrative non fiction about utopic communities in eastern north america. Covers the shakers, new harmony, brentwood, twin oaks, perfectionists, Thoreau and then some. Quite good overall. ...