Glass House: The 1% Economy and the Shattering of the All-American Town

Glass House: The 1% Economy and the Shattering of the All-American Town

In 1947, Forbes magazine declared Lancaster, Ohio the epitome of the all-American town. Today it is damaged, discouraged, and fighting for its future. In Glass House, journalist Brian Alexander uses the story of one town to show how seeds sown 35 years ago have sprouted to give us Trumpism, inequality, and an eroding national cohesion.The Anchor Hocking Glass Company, once...

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Title:Glass House: The 1% Economy and the Shattering of the All-American Town
Author:Brian Alexander
Rating:
ISBN:1250085802
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:336 pages

Glass House: The 1% Economy and the Shattering of the All-American Town Reviews

  • Sara
    Dec 17, 2016
    What a sad state of affairs many of America's cities have succumbed to. Lancaster Ohio is no exception. A once great city much like Detroit has fallen from its mighty throne. This book does a fabulous job of following local residents and in a heartfelt way it points out the sadly slowly demising Ame...
  • Carla Bayha
    Jan 03, 2017
    The life and death and signs of life of Anchor Hocking Glass Company serves as a platform to tell the story of how greed brought on by Reaganomics and private equity raiders ("Barbarians") stole most of the capital from a company and a thriving Ohio town, capital that took decades to build, but only...
  • Joshua
    Feb 27, 2017
    Forget Hillbilly Elegy, if you want to understand why Donald Trump is President, why he won in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, read this book. This is a damning indictment on why America is coming unraveled, and why if we keep on our current trajectory without making some big changes, without...
  • Jessica
    Feb 08, 2017
    The "Hocking" in Anchor Hocking is the name of the river that I could see from the window in my childhood bedroom, less than an hour south of Lancaster. This book tells a story that is very important to me, personally. I have millions of thoughts on this book and I will eventually coalesce them into...
  • Christopher Lawson
    Feb 09, 2017
    GLASS HOUSE a story that shows the more base side of capitalism, where short-term profits are paramount, and people are just things in the way. The story is not a fun read--it's actually quite sad, and unfortunately, there isn't a cheery ending. Nevertheless, this tale is a story that needs telling,...
  • Evie
    Feb 19, 2017
    This Book Was: Informative, Heart-Rending, A MUST-Read for 2017 in America. If you read Hillbilly Elegy and/or Strangers In Their Own Land, you NEED to read this. Content Rating: Rated-R for (quoted) Cursing, Drug Use, Racism, and Depression-Triggers for anyone with a sense of Empathy. Maturity Rati...
  • Jeremy
    Feb 19, 2017
    I grew up in Lancaster. When I was five I lived on Maud Avenue and could see the west side Anchor Hocking plant from my back yard. My grandma lived by Cherry Street Park and you could see the defunct east side plant from her front porch. But by the time I was in high school Anchor Hocking's heyday h...
  • Tracy
    Feb 17, 2017
    Did I understand all the finance in this book? Nope. But it's desperately important to demystify the methods by which late capitalism (not immigration) defangs unions and enables opioid addiction. ...
  • Tyler
    Feb 24, 2017
    "Corporate elites said they needed free-trade agreements, so they got them. Manufacturers said that they needed tax breaks and public-money incentives in order to keep their plants operating in the United States, so they got them. Banks and financiers needed looser regulations, so they got them. Emp...
  • Nann
    Mar 19, 2017
    I heard Brian Alexander interviewed on NPR and immediately reserved the book at the library. This read like a horror story of impending doom. Corporate takeovers occur for many reasons. Sometimes it's to consolidate industry rivals. Other times (most often nowadays) it's to make financiers even rich...