Havana: A Subtropical Delirium

Havana: A Subtropical Delirium

Award-winning author Mark Kurlansky presents an insider's view of Havana: the elegant, tattered city he has come to know over more than thirty years. Part cultural history, part travelogue, with recipes, historic engravings, photographs, and Kurlansky's own pen-and-ink drawings throughout, Havana celebrates the city's singular music, literature, baseball, and food; its fiv Award-winning author Mark Kurlansky presents an insider's view of Havana: the elegant, tattered city he has come to know ...

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Title:Havana: A Subtropical Delirium
Author:Mark Kurlansky
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:163286391X
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:272 pages pages

Havana: A Subtropical Delirium Reviews

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    Feb 20, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

  • Lee
    Nov 27, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

  • Jason Pettus
    Mar 07, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

  • Rick Rapp
    May 11, 2018

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

    This was a good read. I haven't been to Cuba and had heard and read conflicting reports about what life is like there. Now I'm looking forward to PBS' Great Performances chapter on the music that Kurlansky tells us is everywhere in that fabled city. A lot of history is presented here a...

    An interesting look at the history of a fascinating city (and to a lesser extent the country as a whole). The addition of short literary excerpts added to the richness. Some of the history (as with most of the Americas) is depressing, particularly with regard to slavery, but it has res...

    I adored this book. It's a very quick and lively read written with obvious affection for the city and people of Havana. I've never had any particular interest in Cuba or Havana aside from my general interest in geography (especially the geography of places I expect never to visit perso...

    I think the easiest way to describe this book is that it's essentially a biography of the city of Havana, Cuba. The author delves into many topics, such as the strong African influence on Cuban culture, the history of the founding of the city, restaurants, and the distinct sense of hum...

    Before reading this book, I knew almost nothing about Cuba. After reading it, I felt that I really got to know the history of Cuba and what it "feels" like to live in Cuba. The author did a masterful job describing the city through famous authors, artists, and music. It's a thoughtful ...

    This is a fantastic book, probably one of the best "city biographies" I have ever read. Kurlansky creates a very complex picture, layer upon layer, of unique culture and history, leaving the facts to do the work of describing Havana. He also seems to be one of those writers who like to...

    Absolutely fascinating. I wasn't particularly interested in the subject, but really enjoy Kurlansky's (Koo-las-key, as they say in Havana) writing. He does not disappoint! Just one revelation after the other, from beginning to end, about this city of perpetual decay; it's people, it's ...

    A lot of research went into this book, and there was a great deal of interesting information, of fascinating tidbits, between its covers. Unfortunately, these tidbits were presented in a scattershot manner that skipped from glimpses of life in Havana to drink recipes to Hemingway st...

    I really enjoy Kurlansky's writing style. It flows so conversationally, that one sails through the book. This book is fascinating explanation of Havana and its history, with much additional flavor thrown in. It touches on slavery, politics, music, racism, pride, art, and all sorts of o...

  • Michael Kocinski
    Dec 02, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

    This was a good read. I haven't been to Cuba and had heard and read conflicting reports about what life is like there. Now I'm looking forward to PBS' Great Performances chapter on the music that Kurlansky tells us is everywhere in that fabled city. A lot of history is presented here a...

    An interesting look at the history of a fascinating city (and to a lesser extent the country as a whole). The addition of short literary excerpts added to the richness. Some of the history (as with most of the Americas) is depressing, particularly with regard to slavery, but it has res...

    I adored this book. It's a very quick and lively read written with obvious affection for the city and people of Havana. I've never had any particular interest in Cuba or Havana aside from my general interest in geography (especially the geography of places I expect never to visit perso...

    I think the easiest way to describe this book is that it's essentially a biography of the city of Havana, Cuba. The author delves into many topics, such as the strong African influence on Cuban culture, the history of the founding of the city, restaurants, and the distinct sense of hum...

    Before reading this book, I knew almost nothing about Cuba. After reading it, I felt that I really got to know the history of Cuba and what it "feels" like to live in Cuba. The author did a masterful job describing the city through famous authors, artists, and music. It's a thoughtful ...

    This is a fantastic book, probably one of the best "city biographies" I have ever read. Kurlansky creates a very complex picture, layer upon layer, of unique culture and history, leaving the facts to do the work of describing Havana. He also seems to be one of those writers who like to...

    Absolutely fascinating. I wasn't particularly interested in the subject, but really enjoy Kurlansky's (Koo-las-key, as they say in Havana) writing. He does not disappoint! Just one revelation after the other, from beginning to end, about this city of perpetual decay; it's people, it's ...

    A lot of research went into this book, and there was a great deal of interesting information, of fascinating tidbits, between its covers. Unfortunately, these tidbits were presented in a scattershot manner that skipped from glimpses of life in Havana to drink recipes to Hemingway st...

    I really enjoy Kurlansky's writing style. It flows so conversationally, that one sails through the book. This book is fascinating explanation of Havana and its history, with much additional flavor thrown in. It touches on slavery, politics, music, racism, pride, art, and all sorts of o...

    I didn't find it as compelling a read as Cod, or Salt. It felt a little lifeless and dry considering the subject matter. Kurlansky tells his reader throughout the book that Havana is vibrant, lively, full of conflicting cultural influences, but the writing doesn't illustrate these aspe...

  • Jane LaFazio
    Jan 16, 2018

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

  • Janine
    Oct 02, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

  • Esil
    Mar 05, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

  • DŠµnnis
    Sep 04, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

  • Diane S ā˜”
    Mar 20, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

  • Sara G
    Sep 09, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

    This was a good read. I haven't been to Cuba and had heard and read conflicting reports about what life is like there. Now I'm looking forward to PBS' Great Performances chapter on the music that Kurlansky tells us is everywhere in that fabled city. A lot of history is presented here a...

    An interesting look at the history of a fascinating city (and to a lesser extent the country as a whole). The addition of short literary excerpts added to the richness. Some of the history (as with most of the Americas) is depressing, particularly with regard to slavery, but it has res...

    I adored this book. It's a very quick and lively read written with obvious affection for the city and people of Havana. I've never had any particular interest in Cuba or Havana aside from my general interest in geography (especially the geography of places I expect never to visit perso...

    I think the easiest way to describe this book is that it's essentially a biography of the city of Havana, Cuba. The author delves into many topics, such as the strong African influence on Cuban culture, the history of the founding of the city, restaurants, and the distinct sense of hum...

  • Carole
    Mar 18, 2018

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

  • Yana Shevkirova
    Mar 27, 2018

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

    This was a good read. I haven't been to Cuba and had heard and read conflicting reports about what life is like there. Now I'm looking forward to PBS' Great Performances chapter on the music that Kurlansky tells us is everywhere in that fabled city. A lot of history is presented here a...

    An interesting look at the history of a fascinating city (and to a lesser extent the country as a whole). The addition of short literary excerpts added to the richness. Some of the history (as with most of the Americas) is depressing, particularly with regard to slavery, but it has res...

    I adored this book. It's a very quick and lively read written with obvious affection for the city and people of Havana. I've never had any particular interest in Cuba or Havana aside from my general interest in geography (especially the geography of places I expect never to visit perso...

    I think the easiest way to describe this book is that it's essentially a biography of the city of Havana, Cuba. The author delves into many topics, such as the strong African influence on Cuban culture, the history of the founding of the city, restaurants, and the distinct sense of hum...

    Before reading this book, I knew almost nothing about Cuba. After reading it, I felt that I really got to know the history of Cuba and what it "feels" like to live in Cuba. The author did a masterful job describing the city through famous authors, artists, and music. It's a thoughtful ...

    This is a fantastic book, probably one of the best "city biographies" I have ever read. Kurlansky creates a very complex picture, layer upon layer, of unique culture and history, leaving the facts to do the work of describing Havana. He also seems to be one of those writers who like to...

  • Claudia
    Oct 27, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

    This was a good read. I haven't been to Cuba and had heard and read conflicting reports about what life is like there. Now I'm looking forward to PBS' Great Performances chapter on the music that Kurlansky tells us is everywhere in that fabled city. A lot of history is presented here a...

    An interesting look at the history of a fascinating city (and to a lesser extent the country as a whole). The addition of short literary excerpts added to the richness. Some of the history (as with most of the Americas) is depressing, particularly with regard to slavery, but it has res...

    I adored this book. It's a very quick and lively read written with obvious affection for the city and people of Havana. I've never had any particular interest in Cuba or Havana aside from my general interest in geography (especially the geography of places I expect never to visit perso...

    I think the easiest way to describe this book is that it's essentially a biography of the city of Havana, Cuba. The author delves into many topics, such as the strong African influence on Cuban culture, the history of the founding of the city, restaurants, and the distinct sense of hum...

    Before reading this book, I knew almost nothing about Cuba. After reading it, I felt that I really got to know the history of Cuba and what it "feels" like to live in Cuba. The author did a masterful job describing the city through famous authors, artists, and music. It's a thoughtful ...

    This is a fantastic book, probably one of the best "city biographies" I have ever read. Kurlansky creates a very complex picture, layer upon layer, of unique culture and history, leaving the facts to do the work of describing Havana. He also seems to be one of those writers who like to...

    Absolutely fascinating. I wasn't particularly interested in the subject, but really enjoy Kurlansky's (Koo-las-key, as they say in Havana) writing. He does not disappoint! Just one revelation after the other, from beginning to end, about this city of perpetual decay; it's people, it's ...

    A lot of research went into this book, and there was a great deal of interesting information, of fascinating tidbits, between its covers. Unfortunately, these tidbits were presented in a scattershot manner that skipped from glimpses of life in Havana to drink recipes to Hemingway st...

    I really enjoy Kurlansky's writing style. It flows so conversationally, that one sails through the book. This book is fascinating explanation of Havana and its history, with much additional flavor thrown in. It touches on slavery, politics, music, racism, pride, art, and all sorts of o...

    I didn't find it as compelling a read as Cod, or Salt. It felt a little lifeless and dry considering the subject matter. Kurlansky tells his reader throughout the book that Havana is vibrant, lively, full of conflicting cultural influences, but the writing doesn't illustrate these aspe...

    Kurlansky does a great job of making history, which is often drab, palatable and enthralling. I couldn't put this book down, asking myself, "What aspect of Cuban culture will he mention next?" He certainly touched on a lot of important points. I especially appreciated the references to...

    This is a good history/cultural guide to Havana. It was actually a pretty breezy read. It would be a great resource for someone who is traveling to Havana, or who has an interest in doing so, who wants to better understand Havana without necessarily diving into a dense history. The his...

  • JennLynn
    Mar 19, 2018

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

    This was a good read. I haven't been to Cuba and had heard and read conflicting reports about what life is like there. Now I'm looking forward to PBS' Great Performances chapter on the music that Kurlansky tells us is everywhere in that fabled city. A lot of history is presented here a...

    An interesting look at the history of a fascinating city (and to a lesser extent the country as a whole). The addition of short literary excerpts added to the richness. Some of the history (as with most of the Americas) is depressing, particularly with regard to slavery, but it has res...

  • Christopher
    Apr 02, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

  • Barbara M
    Aug 04, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

    This was a good read. I haven't been to Cuba and had heard and read conflicting reports about what life is like there. Now I'm looking forward to PBS' Great Performances chapter on the music that Kurlansky tells us is everywhere in that fabled city. A lot of history is presented here a...

    An interesting look at the history of a fascinating city (and to a lesser extent the country as a whole). The addition of short literary excerpts added to the richness. Some of the history (as with most of the Americas) is depressing, particularly with regard to slavery, but it has res...

    I adored this book. It's a very quick and lively read written with obvious affection for the city and people of Havana. I've never had any particular interest in Cuba or Havana aside from my general interest in geography (especially the geography of places I expect never to visit perso...

    I think the easiest way to describe this book is that it's essentially a biography of the city of Havana, Cuba. The author delves into many topics, such as the strong African influence on Cuban culture, the history of the founding of the city, restaurants, and the distinct sense of hum...

    Before reading this book, I knew almost nothing about Cuba. After reading it, I felt that I really got to know the history of Cuba and what it "feels" like to live in Cuba. The author did a masterful job describing the city through famous authors, artists, and music. It's a thoughtful ...

  • Tekla
    Jul 19, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

  • Joseph
    Mar 09, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

  • Linda Smatzny
    Mar 19, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

  • Claudia
    Dec 18, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

    This was a good read. I haven't been to Cuba and had heard and read conflicting reports about what life is like there. Now I'm looking forward to PBS' Great Performances chapter on the music that Kurlansky tells us is everywhere in that fabled city. A lot of history is presented here a...

    An interesting look at the history of a fascinating city (and to a lesser extent the country as a whole). The addition of short literary excerpts added to the richness. Some of the history (as with most of the Americas) is depressing, particularly with regard to slavery, but it has res...

    I adored this book. It's a very quick and lively read written with obvious affection for the city and people of Havana. I've never had any particular interest in Cuba or Havana aside from my general interest in geography (especially the geography of places I expect never to visit perso...

    I think the easiest way to describe this book is that it's essentially a biography of the city of Havana, Cuba. The author delves into many topics, such as the strong African influence on Cuban culture, the history of the founding of the city, restaurants, and the distinct sense of hum...

    Before reading this book, I knew almost nothing about Cuba. After reading it, I felt that I really got to know the history of Cuba and what it "feels" like to live in Cuba. The author did a masterful job describing the city through famous authors, artists, and music. It's a thoughtful ...

    This is a fantastic book, probably one of the best "city biographies" I have ever read. Kurlansky creates a very complex picture, layer upon layer, of unique culture and history, leaving the facts to do the work of describing Havana. He also seems to be one of those writers who like to...

    Absolutely fascinating. I wasn't particularly interested in the subject, but really enjoy Kurlansky's (Koo-las-key, as they say in Havana) writing. He does not disappoint! Just one revelation after the other, from beginning to end, about this city of perpetual decay; it's people, it's ...

    A lot of research went into this book, and there was a great deal of interesting information, of fascinating tidbits, between its covers. Unfortunately, these tidbits were presented in a scattershot manner that skipped from glimpses of life in Havana to drink recipes to Hemingway st...

    I really enjoy Kurlansky's writing style. It flows so conversationally, that one sails through the book. This book is fascinating explanation of Havana and its history, with much additional flavor thrown in. It touches on slavery, politics, music, racism, pride, art, and all sorts of o...

    I didn't find it as compelling a read as Cod, or Salt. It felt a little lifeless and dry considering the subject matter. Kurlansky tells his reader throughout the book that Havana is vibrant, lively, full of conflicting cultural influences, but the writing doesn't illustrate these aspe...

    Kurlansky does a great job of making history, which is often drab, palatable and enthralling. I couldn't put this book down, asking myself, "What aspect of Cuban culture will he mention next?" He certainly touched on a lot of important points. I especially appreciated the references to...

  • Christina
    Jul 26, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

  • Evan Clark
    May 06, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

  • Melissa
    May 10, 2018

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

  • Richard Duncan
    Jun 30, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

    This was a good read. I haven't been to Cuba and had heard and read conflicting reports about what life is like there. Now I'm looking forward to PBS' Great Performances chapter on the music that Kurlansky tells us is everywhere in that fabled city. A lot of history is presented here a...

    An interesting look at the history of a fascinating city (and to a lesser extent the country as a whole). The addition of short literary excerpts added to the richness. Some of the history (as with most of the Americas) is depressing, particularly with regard to slavery, but it has res...

    I adored this book. It's a very quick and lively read written with obvious affection for the city and people of Havana. I've never had any particular interest in Cuba or Havana aside from my general interest in geography (especially the geography of places I expect never to visit perso...

    I think the easiest way to describe this book is that it's essentially a biography of the city of Havana, Cuba. The author delves into many topics, such as the strong African influence on Cuban culture, the history of the founding of the city, restaurants, and the distinct sense of hum...

    Before reading this book, I knew almost nothing about Cuba. After reading it, I felt that I really got to know the history of Cuba and what it "feels" like to live in Cuba. The author did a masterful job describing the city through famous authors, artists, and music. It's a thoughtful ...

    This is a fantastic book, probably one of the best "city biographies" I have ever read. Kurlansky creates a very complex picture, layer upon layer, of unique culture and history, leaving the facts to do the work of describing Havana. He also seems to be one of those writers who like to...

    Absolutely fascinating. I wasn't particularly interested in the subject, but really enjoy Kurlansky's (Koo-las-key, as they say in Havana) writing. He does not disappoint! Just one revelation after the other, from beginning to end, about this city of perpetual decay; it's people, it's ...

    A lot of research went into this book, and there was a great deal of interesting information, of fascinating tidbits, between its covers. Unfortunately, these tidbits were presented in a scattershot manner that skipped from glimpses of life in Havana to drink recipes to Hemingway st...

  • Paul Lorentz
    Aug 09, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

    This was a good read. I haven't been to Cuba and had heard and read conflicting reports about what life is like there. Now I'm looking forward to PBS' Great Performances chapter on the music that Kurlansky tells us is everywhere in that fabled city. A lot of history is presented here a...

    An interesting look at the history of a fascinating city (and to a lesser extent the country as a whole). The addition of short literary excerpts added to the richness. Some of the history (as with most of the Americas) is depressing, particularly with regard to slavery, but it has res...

    I adored this book. It's a very quick and lively read written with obvious affection for the city and people of Havana. I've never had any particular interest in Cuba or Havana aside from my general interest in geography (especially the geography of places I expect never to visit perso...

  • Tiffany
    Jun 19, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

    This was a good read. I haven't been to Cuba and had heard and read conflicting reports about what life is like there. Now I'm looking forward to PBS' Great Performances chapter on the music that Kurlansky tells us is everywhere in that fabled city. A lot of history is presented here a...

    An interesting look at the history of a fascinating city (and to a lesser extent the country as a whole). The addition of short literary excerpts added to the richness. Some of the history (as with most of the Americas) is depressing, particularly with regard to slavery, but it has res...

    I adored this book. It's a very quick and lively read written with obvious affection for the city and people of Havana. I've never had any particular interest in Cuba or Havana aside from my general interest in geography (especially the geography of places I expect never to visit perso...

    I think the easiest way to describe this book is that it's essentially a biography of the city of Havana, Cuba. The author delves into many topics, such as the strong African influence on Cuban culture, the history of the founding of the city, restaurants, and the distinct sense of hum...

    Before reading this book, I knew almost nothing about Cuba. After reading it, I felt that I really got to know the history of Cuba and what it "feels" like to live in Cuba. The author did a masterful job describing the city through famous authors, artists, and music. It's a thoughtful ...

    This is a fantastic book, probably one of the best "city biographies" I have ever read. Kurlansky creates a very complex picture, layer upon layer, of unique culture and history, leaving the facts to do the work of describing Havana. He also seems to be one of those writers who like to...

    Absolutely fascinating. I wasn't particularly interested in the subject, but really enjoy Kurlansky's (Koo-las-key, as they say in Havana) writing. He does not disappoint! Just one revelation after the other, from beginning to end, about this city of perpetual decay; it's people, it's ...

  • Lukasz Chmielewski
    Mar 28, 2018

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

  • Collins
    Feb 27, 2018

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

  • Barbm1020
    Oct 06, 2017

    I have never been to Havana, the closest I have gotten is San Juan, Puerto Rico which I loved but which the author makes clear is a poor substitution for Havana. This was just enough of a biography of a city that has been remade several times over, though some things always stay the sa...

    I've been to Cuba many times on holidays to warm my bones and get away from the cold Canadian winter for a few days. These were mostly resort vacations on Cuba's beautiful beaches. Quite a few years ago, a childhood friend and I were marking a common big birthday and we decided to spen...

    "Havana is not a city for people who are squeamish about sweat. Sweat is one of the many defining smells in redolent Havana and is a leitmotif in almost all Havana literature." If you are familiar with Kurlansky's other non-fiction, for instance Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Cha...

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Although I enjoyed Mark Kurlansky's newest nonfiction book Havana, I don't actually have ...

    I gave it a three, because I felt it was a bit uneven. Some parts were really good and some not so much. The book is a very broad overview of Cuba's history to current situation, with random facts through out. I'm going to Cuba next month, so it was a worthwhile read for me. ...

    With the normalization of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, the easing of travel restrictions to the island, and the death of Fidel Castro last year, more Americans will have the opportunity to visit this gem of the Caribbean soon (assuming the Trump administrati...

    Such a well written book and just what I needed after reading a book set in Havana and needing to know more. Kurlansky's writing style is extremely engaging; it's conversational and witty while still being informative and often lyrical. Although at times I wanted more of the politics o...

    The book takes the reader thru the history of Havana by writing about its people, its architecture and its blend of cultures. Some of these are very different from the rest of Cuba. The author has been visiting Havana for over thirty years so has seen some of the changes. The book is s...

    Stroll along the shady streets of Havana with Mark Kurlansky, a most trustworthy and entertaining tour guide. Simply put, this is a beautifully written book, captivating from start to end. Kurlansky paints an indelible, wonderful portrait of a city and the Habaneros who have lived,...

    ?????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ????? ???? ?? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ????? ??????? ? ??? ?????????? ???? ???...

    What Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil did for Savannah and the Deep South, this does for Havana. Part history, part social commentary, with some minor adventures and snark thrown in, it serves as a very decent snapshot of an often misrepresented city. ...

    I?ve read this book twice within six weeks. First I read it before leaving for my trip to Cuba. Then I borrowed it again a couple of days ago, to refresh my memory before writing this review and I was immediately drawn into a second reading, recognizing things and places that I?d s...

    It was a fun read with lots of little quirky things thrown in. The history was interesting and Kurlansy did a good job of bringing it up to the current time. Since I was fortunate enough to visit there several years ago - mostly Havana - it brought back many memories of places I visite...

    I have never been to Havana, but since I live in "north Cuba" , aka south Florida, I have always been fascinated by Cuba and its culture. I found this to be a fascinating and enjoyable read. The author's writing style reads more like fiction than non-fiction. His books read like storie...

    I enjoyed this compilation of history and culture. The author does a good job weaving together the details of Havana's history with the influence that had on its current way and state of being; and while his summary does leave me wanting to know more, his presentation of the highlights...

    Mark Kurlansky is such a good writer. It's like curling up with a friend over a cup of tea. Like many visitors, I came under the spell the city's crumbling (is there ever a description of Havana without this word?) splendor. Kurlansky captures its charm and adds much more. Bringing in ...

    Pere?ka. Ksi??ka napisana bardzo ?atwo, przyjemnie, przyst?pnie, a jednocze?nie pi?knie, ?wietnie oddaj?c klimat podzwrotnikowego miasta. Kurlansky odwali? kawa? dobrej roboty analizuj?c wszystko to, co sk?ada si? na Hawan? - omówi? jej histori?, architektur?, trady...

    A little bit of history, a little bit of cultural observation (music, food, religion, baseball), quite a bit of quotes from Cuban authors and others who have written about Havana, a couple of recipes, and very little politics which I thought was interesting because we're talkin ab...

    This was a good read. I haven't been to Cuba and had heard and read conflicting reports about what life is like there. Now I'm looking forward to PBS' Great Performances chapter on the music that Kurlansky tells us is everywhere in that fabled city. A lot of history is presented here a...