Magdalene

Magdalene

Magdalene imagines the biblical figure of Mary Magdalene as a woman who embodies the spiritual and sensual, alive in a contemporary landscape?hailing a cab, raising a child, listening to news on the radio. Between facing the traumas of her past and navigating daily life, the narrator of Magdalene yearns for the guidance of her spiritual teacher, a Christ figure, whose deat Magdalene imagines the biblical figure of Mary Magdalene as a woman who embodies the spiritual and sensual, alive in a ...

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Title:Magdalene
Author:Marie Howe
Rating:
Genres:Poetry
ISBN:Magdalene
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:96 pages pages

Magdalene Reviews

  • Jessica
    Sep 04, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

    Excellent book of poetry. I had heard Marie Howe read at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in May 2017 and I was impressed by her. Once I started reading Magdalene, I couldn't put it down. The poems are double-spaced so there is not much text on a page and I found myself moving from on...

    This new volume of poems by Howe is just as compelling as her previous works. The volume is a study of who Mary Magdalene might have been as a biblical figure and as a contemporary one. The tension between the two is invigorating and fresh. The narrator yearns for guidance or some ...

    This collection somehow lacked conviction for me, and left me cold. While Howe's poems can be deep in feeling (especially when writing about topics such as grief), these seemed shallowly felt. I thought Magdalene was somewhat flimsily characterized, and the eroticism of these poems--of...

    This is a really solid collection of poems. Admittedly, I'm too much of a traditionalist (and a prude) to truly appreciate the Jesus erotica elements, but some evocative imagery and great lines. Interspersed with her Mary Magdalene poems are poetry, are poems about daily life, children...

    I liked it. I didn?t love it. That might just be bc recently I?ve been reading a lot of poetry that invokes religious imagery and characterization juxtaposing and inserting it into modern and mundane life. Howe has a great style, I like how simple it is without losing depth. One th...

    stunning. sometimes i don't feel as connected to poetry as i do to prose, but this book showed that poetry can let a narrative unfold in a unique, rewarding way. these poems are all interconnected and tell the story of a life dexterously, shedding light on the small details and the big...

    A perfect little gem of a book. I picked it up to read one poem, and finished it in a greedy gulp. I will be revisiting at a slower pace, to be sure. "He said something like, You're going to be ok now, or, It's been difficult hasn't it, but what he said mattered only a little....

  • Jim Coughenour
    May 23, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

  • Ken
    Feb 27, 2018

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

  • James
    Jan 13, 2018

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

    Excellent book of poetry. I had heard Marie Howe read at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in May 2017 and I was impressed by her. Once I started reading Magdalene, I couldn't put it down. The poems are double-spaced so there is not much text on a page and I found myself moving from on...

    This new volume of poems by Howe is just as compelling as her previous works. The volume is a study of who Mary Magdalene might have been as a biblical figure and as a contemporary one. The tension between the two is invigorating and fresh. The narrator yearns for guidance or some ...

    This collection somehow lacked conviction for me, and left me cold. While Howe's poems can be deep in feeling (especially when writing about topics such as grief), these seemed shallowly felt. I thought Magdalene was somewhat flimsily characterized, and the eroticism of these poems--of...

    This is a really solid collection of poems. Admittedly, I'm too much of a traditionalist (and a prude) to truly appreciate the Jesus erotica elements, but some evocative imagery and great lines. Interspersed with her Mary Magdalene poems are poetry, are poems about daily life, children...

  • Rick
    Oct 19, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

  • Stephen Lamb
    Jun 11, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

  • Jerrie (redwritinghood)
    Jun 11, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

  • Tara
    Apr 16, 2018

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

  • Linda
    May 27, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

  • Julia
    Jun 12, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

  • Mary
    Oct 17, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

    Excellent book of poetry. I had heard Marie Howe read at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in May 2017 and I was impressed by her. Once I started reading Magdalene, I couldn't put it down. The poems are double-spaced so there is not much text on a page and I found myself moving from on...

    This new volume of poems by Howe is just as compelling as her previous works. The volume is a study of who Mary Magdalene might have been as a biblical figure and as a contemporary one. The tension between the two is invigorating and fresh. The narrator yearns for guidance or some ...

    This collection somehow lacked conviction for me, and left me cold. While Howe's poems can be deep in feeling (especially when writing about topics such as grief), these seemed shallowly felt. I thought Magdalene was somewhat flimsily characterized, and the eroticism of these poems--of...

    This is a really solid collection of poems. Admittedly, I'm too much of a traditionalist (and a prude) to truly appreciate the Jesus erotica elements, but some evocative imagery and great lines. Interspersed with her Mary Magdalene poems are poetry, are poems about daily life, children...

    I liked it. I didn?t love it. That might just be bc recently I?ve been reading a lot of poetry that invokes religious imagery and characterization juxtaposing and inserting it into modern and mundane life. Howe has a great style, I like how simple it is without losing depth. One th...

    stunning. sometimes i don't feel as connected to poetry as i do to prose, but this book showed that poetry can let a narrative unfold in a unique, rewarding way. these poems are all interconnected and tell the story of a life dexterously, shedding light on the small details and the big...

    A perfect little gem of a book. I picked it up to read one poem, and finished it in a greedy gulp. I will be revisiting at a slower pace, to be sure. "He said something like, You're going to be ok now, or, It's been difficult hasn't it, but what he said mattered only a little....

    Howe begins this books of poems as written through the eyes of a contemporary Mary Magdalene. I see her on a street corner in the rain with a cigarette hanging from her lips, a too-short skirt, a run in her nylons, and heavy black eyeliner. She looks older than she is. Poems both pure ...

    Amazing! Poems that are so personal that you ache. I will never see Mary Magdalene the same way. She is like a universal woman--busy, damaged, loved, scorned, betrayed. Her life stands along side the poet's life and the lives she describes. Really breathtaking. ...

  • Sarah
    Nov 18, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

    Excellent book of poetry. I had heard Marie Howe read at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in May 2017 and I was impressed by her. Once I started reading Magdalene, I couldn't put it down. The poems are double-spaced so there is not much text on a page and I found myself moving from on...

    This new volume of poems by Howe is just as compelling as her previous works. The volume is a study of who Mary Magdalene might have been as a biblical figure and as a contemporary one. The tension between the two is invigorating and fresh. The narrator yearns for guidance or some ...

    This collection somehow lacked conviction for me, and left me cold. While Howe's poems can be deep in feeling (especially when writing about topics such as grief), these seemed shallowly felt. I thought Magdalene was somewhat flimsily characterized, and the eroticism of these poems--of...

    This is a really solid collection of poems. Admittedly, I'm too much of a traditionalist (and a prude) to truly appreciate the Jesus erotica elements, but some evocative imagery and great lines. Interspersed with her Mary Magdalene poems are poetry, are poems about daily life, children...

    I liked it. I didn?t love it. That might just be bc recently I?ve been reading a lot of poetry that invokes religious imagery and characterization juxtaposing and inserting it into modern and mundane life. Howe has a great style, I like how simple it is without losing depth. One th...

    stunning. sometimes i don't feel as connected to poetry as i do to prose, but this book showed that poetry can let a narrative unfold in a unique, rewarding way. these poems are all interconnected and tell the story of a life dexterously, shedding light on the small details and the big...

    A perfect little gem of a book. I picked it up to read one poem, and finished it in a greedy gulp. I will be revisiting at a slower pace, to be sure. "He said something like, You're going to be ok now, or, It's been difficult hasn't it, but what he said mattered only a little....

    Howe begins this books of poems as written through the eyes of a contemporary Mary Magdalene. I see her on a street corner in the rain with a cigarette hanging from her lips, a too-short skirt, a run in her nylons, and heavy black eyeliner. She looks older than she is. Poems both pure ...

    Amazing! Poems that are so personal that you ache. I will never see Mary Magdalene the same way. She is like a universal woman--busy, damaged, loved, scorned, betrayed. Her life stands along side the poet's life and the lives she describes. Really breathtaking. ...

    Pensive, occasionally erotic, and restless collection of poetry. I was particularly taken with the following: Magdalene: The Woman Taken in Adultery / Magdalene on Gethsemane / Calvary / The Anima Alone / Conversation: Dualism ...

    "The sixth--if I touched my right arm I had to touch my left arm, and if I / touched the left arm a little harder than I'd first touched the right then I had / to retouch the left and then touch the right again so it would be even." (17-18). Marie Howe's newest collection covers th...

    I'm surprised at how underwhelming I found this collection. There are some standout pieces, but as a whole, it fell flat to me. ...

  • Kasey Jueds
    Jul 20, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

  • Robert Vaughan
    Apr 26, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

  • Ellie
    Nov 08, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

  • Jess
    Jan 31, 2018

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

    Excellent book of poetry. I had heard Marie Howe read at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in May 2017 and I was impressed by her. Once I started reading Magdalene, I couldn't put it down. The poems are double-spaced so there is not much text on a page and I found myself moving from on...

    This new volume of poems by Howe is just as compelling as her previous works. The volume is a study of who Mary Magdalene might have been as a biblical figure and as a contemporary one. The tension between the two is invigorating and fresh. The narrator yearns for guidance or some ...

    This collection somehow lacked conviction for me, and left me cold. While Howe's poems can be deep in feeling (especially when writing about topics such as grief), these seemed shallowly felt. I thought Magdalene was somewhat flimsily characterized, and the eroticism of these poems--of...

    This is a really solid collection of poems. Admittedly, I'm too much of a traditionalist (and a prude) to truly appreciate the Jesus erotica elements, but some evocative imagery and great lines. Interspersed with her Mary Magdalene poems are poetry, are poems about daily life, children...

    I liked it. I didn?t love it. That might just be bc recently I?ve been reading a lot of poetry that invokes religious imagery and characterization juxtaposing and inserting it into modern and mundane life. Howe has a great style, I like how simple it is without losing depth. One th...

    stunning. sometimes i don't feel as connected to poetry as i do to prose, but this book showed that poetry can let a narrative unfold in a unique, rewarding way. these poems are all interconnected and tell the story of a life dexterously, shedding light on the small details and the big...

    A perfect little gem of a book. I picked it up to read one poem, and finished it in a greedy gulp. I will be revisiting at a slower pace, to be sure. "He said something like, You're going to be ok now, or, It's been difficult hasn't it, but what he said mattered only a little....

    Howe begins this books of poems as written through the eyes of a contemporary Mary Magdalene. I see her on a street corner in the rain with a cigarette hanging from her lips, a too-short skirt, a run in her nylons, and heavy black eyeliner. She looks older than she is. Poems both pure ...

    Amazing! Poems that are so personal that you ache. I will never see Mary Magdalene the same way. She is like a universal woman--busy, damaged, loved, scorned, betrayed. Her life stands along side the poet's life and the lives she describes. Really breathtaking. ...

    Pensive, occasionally erotic, and restless collection of poetry. I was particularly taken with the following: Magdalene: The Woman Taken in Adultery / Magdalene on Gethsemane / Calvary / The Anima Alone / Conversation: Dualism ...

  • Vincent Scarpa
    Sep 28, 2016

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

  • Patti K
    Dec 19, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

    Excellent book of poetry. I had heard Marie Howe read at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in May 2017 and I was impressed by her. Once I started reading Magdalene, I couldn't put it down. The poems are double-spaced so there is not much text on a page and I found myself moving from on...

    This new volume of poems by Howe is just as compelling as her previous works. The volume is a study of who Mary Magdalene might have been as a biblical figure and as a contemporary one. The tension between the two is invigorating and fresh. The narrator yearns for guidance or some ...

  • Abigail Munson
    Mar 18, 2018

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

    Excellent book of poetry. I had heard Marie Howe read at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in May 2017 and I was impressed by her. Once I started reading Magdalene, I couldn't put it down. The poems are double-spaced so there is not much text on a page and I found myself moving from on...

    This new volume of poems by Howe is just as compelling as her previous works. The volume is a study of who Mary Magdalene might have been as a biblical figure and as a contemporary one. The tension between the two is invigorating and fresh. The narrator yearns for guidance or some ...

    This collection somehow lacked conviction for me, and left me cold. While Howe's poems can be deep in feeling (especially when writing about topics such as grief), these seemed shallowly felt. I thought Magdalene was somewhat flimsily characterized, and the eroticism of these poems--of...

    This is a really solid collection of poems. Admittedly, I'm too much of a traditionalist (and a prude) to truly appreciate the Jesus erotica elements, but some evocative imagery and great lines. Interspersed with her Mary Magdalene poems are poetry, are poems about daily life, children...

    I liked it. I didn?t love it. That might just be bc recently I?ve been reading a lot of poetry that invokes religious imagery and characterization juxtaposing and inserting it into modern and mundane life. Howe has a great style, I like how simple it is without losing depth. One th...

  • Abby
    Oct 13, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

  • Magdalena
    Jul 20, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

  • Sparrow
    Nov 08, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

  • Eva Silverman
    Jun 05, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

    Excellent book of poetry. I had heard Marie Howe read at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in May 2017 and I was impressed by her. Once I started reading Magdalene, I couldn't put it down. The poems are double-spaced so there is not much text on a page and I found myself moving from on...

    This new volume of poems by Howe is just as compelling as her previous works. The volume is a study of who Mary Magdalene might have been as a biblical figure and as a contemporary one. The tension between the two is invigorating and fresh. The narrator yearns for guidance or some ...

    This collection somehow lacked conviction for me, and left me cold. While Howe's poems can be deep in feeling (especially when writing about topics such as grief), these seemed shallowly felt. I thought Magdalene was somewhat flimsily characterized, and the eroticism of these poems--of...

    This is a really solid collection of poems. Admittedly, I'm too much of a traditionalist (and a prude) to truly appreciate the Jesus erotica elements, but some evocative imagery and great lines. Interspersed with her Mary Magdalene poems are poetry, are poems about daily life, children...

    I liked it. I didn?t love it. That might just be bc recently I?ve been reading a lot of poetry that invokes religious imagery and characterization juxtaposing and inserting it into modern and mundane life. Howe has a great style, I like how simple it is without losing depth. One th...

    stunning. sometimes i don't feel as connected to poetry as i do to prose, but this book showed that poetry can let a narrative unfold in a unique, rewarding way. these poems are all interconnected and tell the story of a life dexterously, shedding light on the small details and the big...

  • Juli Anna
    Aug 21, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

    Excellent book of poetry. I had heard Marie Howe read at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in May 2017 and I was impressed by her. Once I started reading Magdalene, I couldn't put it down. The poems are double-spaced so there is not much text on a page and I found myself moving from on...

    This new volume of poems by Howe is just as compelling as her previous works. The volume is a study of who Mary Magdalene might have been as a biblical figure and as a contemporary one. The tension between the two is invigorating and fresh. The narrator yearns for guidance or some ...

    This collection somehow lacked conviction for me, and left me cold. While Howe's poems can be deep in feeling (especially when writing about topics such as grief), these seemed shallowly felt. I thought Magdalene was somewhat flimsily characterized, and the eroticism of these poems--of...

  • Rachel Davies
    May 24, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

  • Emily
    Oct 20, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

    Excellent book of poetry. I had heard Marie Howe read at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in May 2017 and I was impressed by her. Once I started reading Magdalene, I couldn't put it down. The poems are double-spaced so there is not much text on a page and I found myself moving from on...

    This new volume of poems by Howe is just as compelling as her previous works. The volume is a study of who Mary Magdalene might have been as a biblical figure and as a contemporary one. The tension between the two is invigorating and fresh. The narrator yearns for guidance or some ...

    This collection somehow lacked conviction for me, and left me cold. While Howe's poems can be deep in feeling (especially when writing about topics such as grief), these seemed shallowly felt. I thought Magdalene was somewhat flimsily characterized, and the eroticism of these poems--of...

    This is a really solid collection of poems. Admittedly, I'm too much of a traditionalist (and a prude) to truly appreciate the Jesus erotica elements, but some evocative imagery and great lines. Interspersed with her Mary Magdalene poems are poetry, are poems about daily life, children...

    I liked it. I didn?t love it. That might just be bc recently I?ve been reading a lot of poetry that invokes religious imagery and characterization juxtaposing and inserting it into modern and mundane life. Howe has a great style, I like how simple it is without losing depth. One th...

    stunning. sometimes i don't feel as connected to poetry as i do to prose, but this book showed that poetry can let a narrative unfold in a unique, rewarding way. these poems are all interconnected and tell the story of a life dexterously, shedding light on the small details and the big...

    A perfect little gem of a book. I picked it up to read one poem, and finished it in a greedy gulp. I will be revisiting at a slower pace, to be sure. "He said something like, You're going to be ok now, or, It's been difficult hasn't it, but what he said mattered only a little....

    Howe begins this books of poems as written through the eyes of a contemporary Mary Magdalene. I see her on a street corner in the rain with a cigarette hanging from her lips, a too-short skirt, a run in her nylons, and heavy black eyeliner. She looks older than she is. Poems both pure ...

    Amazing! Poems that are so personal that you ache. I will never see Mary Magdalene the same way. She is like a universal woman--busy, damaged, loved, scorned, betrayed. Her life stands along side the poet's life and the lives she describes. Really breathtaking. ...

    Pensive, occasionally erotic, and restless collection of poetry. I was particularly taken with the following: Magdalene: The Woman Taken in Adultery / Magdalene on Gethsemane / Calvary / The Anima Alone / Conversation: Dualism ...

    "The sixth--if I touched my right arm I had to touch my left arm, and if I / touched the left arm a little harder than I'd first touched the right then I had / to retouch the left and then touch the right again so it would be even." (17-18). Marie Howe's newest collection covers th...

  • Deb Nowack
    Jan 02, 2018

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

    Excellent book of poetry. I had heard Marie Howe read at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in May 2017 and I was impressed by her. Once I started reading Magdalene, I couldn't put it down. The poems are double-spaced so there is not much text on a page and I found myself moving from on...

    This new volume of poems by Howe is just as compelling as her previous works. The volume is a study of who Mary Magdalene might have been as a biblical figure and as a contemporary one. The tension between the two is invigorating and fresh. The narrator yearns for guidance or some ...

    This collection somehow lacked conviction for me, and left me cold. While Howe's poems can be deep in feeling (especially when writing about topics such as grief), these seemed shallowly felt. I thought Magdalene was somewhat flimsily characterized, and the eroticism of these poems--of...

    This is a really solid collection of poems. Admittedly, I'm too much of a traditionalist (and a prude) to truly appreciate the Jesus erotica elements, but some evocative imagery and great lines. Interspersed with her Mary Magdalene poems are poetry, are poems about daily life, children...

    I liked it. I didn?t love it. That might just be bc recently I?ve been reading a lot of poetry that invokes religious imagery and characterization juxtaposing and inserting it into modern and mundane life. Howe has a great style, I like how simple it is without losing depth. One th...

    stunning. sometimes i don't feel as connected to poetry as i do to prose, but this book showed that poetry can let a narrative unfold in a unique, rewarding way. these poems are all interconnected and tell the story of a life dexterously, shedding light on the small details and the big...

    A perfect little gem of a book. I picked it up to read one poem, and finished it in a greedy gulp. I will be revisiting at a slower pace, to be sure. "He said something like, You're going to be ok now, or, It's been difficult hasn't it, but what he said mattered only a little....

    Howe begins this books of poems as written through the eyes of a contemporary Mary Magdalene. I see her on a street corner in the rain with a cigarette hanging from her lips, a too-short skirt, a run in her nylons, and heavy black eyeliner. She looks older than she is. Poems both pure ...

  • Scott Pomfret
    Aug 12, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

  • Elizabeth S
    Mar 16, 2017

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

  • Claire Keyes
    Jan 21, 2018

    Over the last year I've tossed several lauded little books aside, irritated by their obsession with their own pain, exclusion, marginality ? in poetry as in conversation, that is not enough. A poem, particularly a poem about personal misery, requires craft, vision and humor. In her n...

    Book One of my two-book Marie Howe tour. Number two is hurtling through the mails now, and I suspect I will like it more than this, though this grew on me once I saw the conceit and set aside the notion that it was mostly about Mary Magdalene. It's about everything, really, but death a...

    An absolutely exquisite yet grounded book of poems. As always, Howe's language is illuminated. These poems examine the world through Mary Magdalene's eyes. They explore desire and personal struggle. A tremendous work of great beauty. ...

    Marie Howe is a wonderfully inspiring example of a poet who doesn't "produce" a lot (I once heard her say at a conference that she feels a responsibility to stick up for poets who write very slowly, since she's one of them), but whose published work is consistently wise, awake, and bea...

    I'd been anticipating this collection since hearing Marie Howe read from it at AWP, and it was well worth the wait. This book cements her as one of my very favorite poets, from whom I will read anything. ?You know how it is something has to put a stick in the spoke to stop th...

    Magnificence. Brilliance. Simplicity. Honesty. Love. One of my favorite poets, and her masterpiece. ...

    From The Teacher Can the body love beyond hunger? You tell me what you know of desire and surrender. ---- These lines work as a good summation of the themes Howe ponders in her fourth collection. I'm glad to have read it, and will be sitting with these poems for a long whil...

    Raw with longing and a hope for guidance, these poems speak to challenges women face in life, relationships and as mothers. The poet imagines a modern-day Mary Magdalene who looks to a Christ-like figure for purpose. Clear voiced, vividly portrayed, and beautiful, this poetry collectio...

    one of the best poets ...

    Words fail me. I wish they'd also failed Howe. Actually, I think they did. ...

    Marie Howe is an icon. Nick Flynn wrote that "Marie Howe has always come as close as any poet since Rilke to touch eternity" ...

    Spare, brooding, equally exacting of the narrator and reader, wonderfully evocative. If one could have guilt for sins not ones own, this collection elicited them. But at the same time the poems were personal and gruff and even reckless, which is what we ask our poets to be. ...

    I bought this book at tonight's poetry reading--and devoured it in one sitting. Intense, lyrical interpretation of the women who are us. ...

    The lines that knocked me out really knocked me out ...

    Not my favorite of hers (because what, really, could ever compare with What the Living Do), but there are still some good poems. It's a very short book; you could read the whole thing in less than an hour. For its shortness, I was disappointed that the publisher didn't seem to think a ...

    Marie Howe's stunningly crafted collection hangs on the persona of Mary Magdalene, but speaks universally about how complex and flawed and divine we are as humans. The poems bleed a range of emotions. Their ordering is flawless. As reviewer Michael Cunningham says in the book jacket: "...

    There are a lot of pieces in here that stick with you. A few of my favorites: "The Anima Alone" "On Men, Their Bodies" "Magdalene and the Interior Life" "Waiting at the River" "Adaptation" "The Visit" "October" "Delivery" "What the Silence Says" "One Day" ...

    Every ten years comes a slender, insightful collection of memorable poems from Maria Howe. Each new volume is a cause to celebrate; it engages you?mind, body and soul. She tackles spirituality, belief, lust, love, friendship, family and ideas from life to death, sacrifice to sufferin...

    Excellent book of poetry. I had heard Marie Howe read at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in May 2017 and I was impressed by her. Once I started reading Magdalene, I couldn't put it down. The poems are double-spaced so there is not much text on a page and I found myself moving from on...