City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris

City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris

Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de La Reynie begins by clearing the streets of filth and installing lanterns throughout Paris, turning it into the City of Light. The fearless La Reynie pursues criminals through the labyrinthine neighborhoods o Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of m...

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Title:City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris
Author:Holly Tucker
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0393239780
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:310 pages pages

City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris Reviews

  • Natalie
    May 18, 2018

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

  • Liz De Coster
    Mar 21, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

  • Miriam
    Mar 22, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

    Very well researched and an interesting look into the scandalous court of Lois XIV, but repetitious and I had trouble keeping track of who was who. Too many M, L and V names and then there were their titles to confuse it even more. This was no arsenic and old lace, it included every po...

    Fun little true crime in Paris during this period. I <3 books like this so much. ...

    I love this book!! Yes, it?s full of macabre details that you cannot imagine but I couldn?t stop reading!! So good!! ...

    This is a very well-written and engrossing story, meticulously documented and sourced. That said, the whole "Affair of the Poisons" -- with its reliance on people informing against each other under torture, mass hysteria, accusations of witchcraft, black masses, infant sacrifice -- rem...

    Sordid historical account of multiple affairs, poisonings, and witchcraft which swept Paris for about five years during the reign of Louis XXIV, a scandal which included his mistresses and associates. More detail than I need about poison's gruesome effects and other unpleasantness such...

    Deception, intrigue, murder and betrayal from the roughest neighborhood up to the highest office in the land. This is not a book about today's political climate, but it might as well be! This incredible true story of The Affair of the Poisons, translated and made into narrative form by...

  • Joanne
    Dec 14, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

    Very well researched and an interesting look into the scandalous court of Lois XIV, but repetitious and I had trouble keeping track of who was who. Too many M, L and V names and then there were their titles to confuse it even more. This was no arsenic and old lace, it included every po...

    Fun little true crime in Paris during this period. I <3 books like this so much. ...

    I love this book!! Yes, it?s full of macabre details that you cannot imagine but I couldn?t stop reading!! So good!! ...

    This is a very well-written and engrossing story, meticulously documented and sourced. That said, the whole "Affair of the Poisons" -- with its reliance on people informing against each other under torture, mass hysteria, accusations of witchcraft, black masses, infant sacrifice -- rem...

    Sordid historical account of multiple affairs, poisonings, and witchcraft which swept Paris for about five years during the reign of Louis XXIV, a scandal which included his mistresses and associates. More detail than I need about poison's gruesome effects and other unpleasantness such...

  • SibylM
    Apr 02, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

    Very well researched and an interesting look into the scandalous court of Lois XIV, but repetitious and I had trouble keeping track of who was who. Too many M, L and V names and then there were their titles to confuse it even more. This was no arsenic and old lace, it included every po...

    Fun little true crime in Paris during this period. I <3 books like this so much. ...

    I love this book!! Yes, it?s full of macabre details that you cannot imagine but I couldn?t stop reading!! So good!! ...

    This is a very well-written and engrossing story, meticulously documented and sourced. That said, the whole "Affair of the Poisons" -- with its reliance on people informing against each other under torture, mass hysteria, accusations of witchcraft, black masses, infant sacrifice -- rem...

  • Susanna - Censored by GoodReads
    May 23, 2018

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

  • Chris
    Jun 24, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

  • Daphne
    Jan 25, 2018

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

    Very well researched and an interesting look into the scandalous court of Lois XIV, but repetitious and I had trouble keeping track of who was who. Too many M, L and V names and then there were their titles to confuse it even more. This was no arsenic and old lace, it included every po...

    Fun little true crime in Paris during this period. I <3 books like this so much. ...

  • Vera Marie
    Mar 08, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

    Very well researched and an interesting look into the scandalous court of Lois XIV, but repetitious and I had trouble keeping track of who was who. Too many M, L and V names and then there were their titles to confuse it even more. This was no arsenic and old lace, it included every po...

    Fun little true crime in Paris during this period. I <3 books like this so much. ...

    I love this book!! Yes, it?s full of macabre details that you cannot imagine but I couldn?t stop reading!! So good!! ...

    This is a very well-written and engrossing story, meticulously documented and sourced. That said, the whole "Affair of the Poisons" -- with its reliance on people informing against each other under torture, mass hysteria, accusations of witchcraft, black masses, infant sacrifice -- rem...

    Sordid historical account of multiple affairs, poisonings, and witchcraft which swept Paris for about five years during the reign of Louis XXIV, a scandal which included his mistresses and associates. More detail than I need about poison's gruesome effects and other unpleasantness such...

    Deception, intrigue, murder and betrayal from the roughest neighborhood up to the highest office in the land. This is not a book about today's political climate, but it might as well be! This incredible true story of The Affair of the Poisons, translated and made into narrative form by...

    I had read Holly Tucker's fascinating history of the discovery of blood transfusions and looked forward to seeing her new book, City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic and the First Police Chief of Paris. I received an advance copy, and it did not disappoint. During the late 16...

  • Barbara (The Bibliophage)
    Jul 13, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

  • Sandy Voegtlen
    Jan 13, 2018

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

  • Kevin Parsons
    Feb 18, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

    Very well researched and an interesting look into the scandalous court of Lois XIV, but repetitious and I had trouble keeping track of who was who. Too many M, L and V names and then there were their titles to confuse it even more. This was no arsenic and old lace, it included every po...

    Fun little true crime in Paris during this period. I <3 books like this so much. ...

    I love this book!! Yes, it?s full of macabre details that you cannot imagine but I couldn?t stop reading!! So good!! ...

    This is a very well-written and engrossing story, meticulously documented and sourced. That said, the whole "Affair of the Poisons" -- with its reliance on people informing against each other under torture, mass hysteria, accusations of witchcraft, black masses, infant sacrifice -- rem...

    Sordid historical account of multiple affairs, poisonings, and witchcraft which swept Paris for about five years during the reign of Louis XXIV, a scandal which included his mistresses and associates. More detail than I need about poison's gruesome effects and other unpleasantness such...

    Deception, intrigue, murder and betrayal from the roughest neighborhood up to the highest office in the land. This is not a book about today's political climate, but it might as well be! This incredible true story of The Affair of the Poisons, translated and made into narrative form by...

    I had read Holly Tucker's fascinating history of the discovery of blood transfusions and looked forward to seeing her new book, City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic and the First Police Chief of Paris. I received an advance copy, and it did not disappoint. During the late 16...

    Rife with greed, murder, and infidelity, this book is a well-researched, yet accessible, account of Nicolas de La Reynie?s quest to end the historic poisoning spree later known as the "Affair of the Poisons" (1677-1682). The mistresses of King Louis XIV are by far the central charact...

    Read 133 pages of this book and then just never felt compelled to resume. It seemed very disjointed to me. The author has done exhaustive research, but I did not find any of the narrative to be particularly significant. Maybe that's my own problem, but even though the author is a wonde...

    An amazing look into the true story of the deceptions and poisonings in the court of Louis XIV, from the viewpoint of Paris' police chief. The narrative sucks you in and holds you through to the end - it was hard for me to put this one down. Holly Tucker skillfully takes you to 17th Ce...

    Very interesting and well researched history. It is very difficult to sift through the many testimonies and interviews and separate truth from lies. Tucker does a good job presenting the events without trying to reach too many final conclusions. That restraint strengthens the integrity...

  • BAM The Bibliomaniac
    Mar 12, 2018

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

  • Katie/Doing Dewey
    Mar 28, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

  • Natacha Pavlov
    Aug 18, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

  • Lidja
    May 31, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

    Very well researched and an interesting look into the scandalous court of Lois XIV, but repetitious and I had trouble keeping track of who was who. Too many M, L and V names and then there were their titles to confuse it even more. This was no arsenic and old lace, it included every po...

    Fun little true crime in Paris during this period. I <3 books like this so much. ...

    I love this book!! Yes, it?s full of macabre details that you cannot imagine but I couldn?t stop reading!! So good!! ...

    This is a very well-written and engrossing story, meticulously documented and sourced. That said, the whole "Affair of the Poisons" -- with its reliance on people informing against each other under torture, mass hysteria, accusations of witchcraft, black masses, infant sacrifice -- rem...

    Sordid historical account of multiple affairs, poisonings, and witchcraft which swept Paris for about five years during the reign of Louis XXIV, a scandal which included his mistresses and associates. More detail than I need about poison's gruesome effects and other unpleasantness such...

    Deception, intrigue, murder and betrayal from the roughest neighborhood up to the highest office in the land. This is not a book about today's political climate, but it might as well be! This incredible true story of The Affair of the Poisons, translated and made into narrative form by...

    I had read Holly Tucker's fascinating history of the discovery of blood transfusions and looked forward to seeing her new book, City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic and the First Police Chief of Paris. I received an advance copy, and it did not disappoint. During the late 16...

    Rife with greed, murder, and infidelity, this book is a well-researched, yet accessible, account of Nicolas de La Reynie?s quest to end the historic poisoning spree later known as the "Affair of the Poisons" (1677-1682). The mistresses of King Louis XIV are by far the central charact...

    Read 133 pages of this book and then just never felt compelled to resume. It seemed very disjointed to me. The author has done exhaustive research, but I did not find any of the narrative to be particularly significant. Maybe that's my own problem, but even though the author is a wonde...

  • Robert Melnyk
    Apr 27, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

  • Bob Schnell
    May 04, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

    Very well researched and an interesting look into the scandalous court of Lois XIV, but repetitious and I had trouble keeping track of who was who. Too many M, L and V names and then there were their titles to confuse it even more. This was no arsenic and old lace, it included every po...

    Fun little true crime in Paris during this period. I <3 books like this so much. ...

    I love this book!! Yes, it?s full of macabre details that you cannot imagine but I couldn?t stop reading!! So good!! ...

    This is a very well-written and engrossing story, meticulously documented and sourced. That said, the whole "Affair of the Poisons" -- with its reliance on people informing against each other under torture, mass hysteria, accusations of witchcraft, black masses, infant sacrifice -- rem...

    Sordid historical account of multiple affairs, poisonings, and witchcraft which swept Paris for about five years during the reign of Louis XXIV, a scandal which included his mistresses and associates. More detail than I need about poison's gruesome effects and other unpleasantness such...

    Deception, intrigue, murder and betrayal from the roughest neighborhood up to the highest office in the land. This is not a book about today's political climate, but it might as well be! This incredible true story of The Affair of the Poisons, translated and made into narrative form by...

    I had read Holly Tucker's fascinating history of the discovery of blood transfusions and looked forward to seeing her new book, City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic and the First Police Chief of Paris. I received an advance copy, and it did not disappoint. During the late 16...

    Rife with greed, murder, and infidelity, this book is a well-researched, yet accessible, account of Nicolas de La Reynie?s quest to end the historic poisoning spree later known as the "Affair of the Poisons" (1677-1682). The mistresses of King Louis XIV are by far the central charact...

    Read 133 pages of this book and then just never felt compelled to resume. It seemed very disjointed to me. The author has done exhaustive research, but I did not find any of the narrative to be particularly significant. Maybe that's my own problem, but even though the author is a wonde...

    An amazing look into the true story of the deceptions and poisonings in the court of Louis XIV, from the viewpoint of Paris' police chief. The narrative sucks you in and holds you through to the end - it was hard for me to put this one down. Holly Tucker skillfully takes you to 17th Ce...

    Very interesting and well researched history. It is very difficult to sift through the many testimonies and interviews and separate truth from lies. Tucker does a good job presenting the events without trying to reach too many final conclusions. That restraint strengthens the integrity...

    Holly Tucker's well-researched book "City of Light, City of Poison" sheds some light on a little known bit of French history. Much as America would like to forget about the Salem witch trials, France would probably like to forget about "The Affair of the Poisons" during Louis XIV's rei...

  • Elspeth Sprenkle
    Mar 03, 2018

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

    Very well researched and an interesting look into the scandalous court of Lois XIV, but repetitious and I had trouble keeping track of who was who. Too many M, L and V names and then there were their titles to confuse it even more. This was no arsenic and old lace, it included every po...

    Fun little true crime in Paris during this period. I <3 books like this so much. ...

    I love this book!! Yes, it?s full of macabre details that you cannot imagine but I couldn?t stop reading!! So good!! ...

  • Faith
    Dec 25, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

  • Amy
    Oct 11, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

  • Rachel
    Mar 18, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

  • Shannon
    Jul 09, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

    Very well researched and an interesting look into the scandalous court of Lois XIV, but repetitious and I had trouble keeping track of who was who. Too many M, L and V names and then there were their titles to confuse it even more. This was no arsenic and old lace, it included every po...

    Fun little true crime in Paris during this period. I <3 books like this so much. ...

    I love this book!! Yes, it?s full of macabre details that you cannot imagine but I couldn?t stop reading!! So good!! ...

    This is a very well-written and engrossing story, meticulously documented and sourced. That said, the whole "Affair of the Poisons" -- with its reliance on people informing against each other under torture, mass hysteria, accusations of witchcraft, black masses, infant sacrifice -- rem...

    Sordid historical account of multiple affairs, poisonings, and witchcraft which swept Paris for about five years during the reign of Louis XXIV, a scandal which included his mistresses and associates. More detail than I need about poison's gruesome effects and other unpleasantness such...

    Deception, intrigue, murder and betrayal from the roughest neighborhood up to the highest office in the land. This is not a book about today's political climate, but it might as well be! This incredible true story of The Affair of the Poisons, translated and made into narrative form by...

    I had read Holly Tucker's fascinating history of the discovery of blood transfusions and looked forward to seeing her new book, City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic and the First Police Chief of Paris. I received an advance copy, and it did not disappoint. During the late 16...

    Rife with greed, murder, and infidelity, this book is a well-researched, yet accessible, account of Nicolas de La Reynie?s quest to end the historic poisoning spree later known as the "Affair of the Poisons" (1677-1682). The mistresses of King Louis XIV are by far the central charact...

  • Sean Gibson
    May 08, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

  • Barbara Nutting
    Jan 12, 2018

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

    Very well researched and an interesting look into the scandalous court of Lois XIV, but repetitious and I had trouble keeping track of who was who. Too many M, L and V names and then there were their titles to confuse it even more. This was no arsenic and old lace, it included every po...

  • Annie
    Jun 18, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

  • Noah Goats
    Jun 11, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

  • Mark Hodges
    Dec 21, 2016

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...

    Sometimes a review will say that a non fiction book reads "like a novel," and this is considered a big compliment. Well, I read a novel about this same event last year (La Chambre Ardente, by Max Gallo) and City of Light, City of Poison was better than that novel in every way. This...

    I picked this up because I read about this scandel before. If you are watching, or have watched, the series Versailles, you should read this. Tucker's book is quite well researched, and she goes into depth with all the players in the scandel surronding the royal court, murder, and chil...

    Audio # 28 You know I've listened to this twice and I think I'd be better off reading Affair of the Poisons or buying the paper book I this one. Audio isn't getting it ...

    Very well researched and an interesting look into the scandalous court of Lois XIV, but repetitious and I had trouble keeping track of who was who. Too many M, L and V names and then there were their titles to confuse it even more. This was no arsenic and old lace, it included every po...

    Fun little true crime in Paris during this period. I <3 books like this so much. ...

    I love this book!! Yes, it?s full of macabre details that you cannot imagine but I couldn?t stop reading!! So good!! ...

    This is a very well-written and engrossing story, meticulously documented and sourced. That said, the whole "Affair of the Poisons" -- with its reliance on people informing against each other under torture, mass hysteria, accusations of witchcraft, black masses, infant sacrifice -- rem...

    Sordid historical account of multiple affairs, poisonings, and witchcraft which swept Paris for about five years during the reign of Louis XXIV, a scandal which included his mistresses and associates. More detail than I need about poison's gruesome effects and other unpleasantness such...

    Deception, intrigue, murder and betrayal from the roughest neighborhood up to the highest office in the land. This is not a book about today's political climate, but it might as well be! This incredible true story of The Affair of the Poisons, translated and made into narrative form by...

    I had read Holly Tucker's fascinating history of the discovery of blood transfusions and looked forward to seeing her new book, City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic and the First Police Chief of Paris. I received an advance copy, and it did not disappoint. During the late 16...

    Rife with greed, murder, and infidelity, this book is a well-researched, yet accessible, account of Nicolas de La Reynie?s quest to end the historic poisoning spree later known as the "Affair of the Poisons" (1677-1682). The mistresses of King Louis XIV are by far the central charact...

    Read 133 pages of this book and then just never felt compelled to resume. It seemed very disjointed to me. The author has done exhaustive research, but I did not find any of the narrative to be particularly significant. Maybe that's my own problem, but even though the author is a wonde...

    An amazing look into the true story of the deceptions and poisonings in the court of Louis XIV, from the viewpoint of Paris' police chief. The narrative sucks you in and holds you through to the end - it was hard for me to put this one down. Holly Tucker skillfully takes you to 17th Ce...

  • Emily
    Oct 04, 2017

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

  • Emesskay
    Dec 14, 2016

    Imagine the Salem witch trials, only instead of rough woolen homespun, everyone is wearing fancy dresses, ridiculous wigs, and too much rouge, and they?re speaking with French accents (well, and in French)?oh, and instead of charges being completely absurd and totally fabricated, l...

    THIS IS A NEW FAVORITE!!! I absolutely LOVED this work of historical nonfiction. Tucker's writing is absolutely phenomenal. She truly paints a picture of 17th century France, and at times it feels like you're reading a novel rather than historical nonfiction. It's a page turner, but...

    *I received a free advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I thought this was going to be a history of founding of Parisian law enforcement, similar to the early days of Scotland Yard. It is not. I expected a police procedural history. Instead, what I g...

    I struggled between giving this book either 2 or 3 stars. The history was really interesting, but I thought the book was very hard to follow. There were so many characters introduced which I thought were not fully explained or developed that it was sometimes hard to keep everyone strai...

    Full review at TheBibliophage.com Holly Tucker has accomplished a feat of research in creating City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris. More than that, Tucker has made the detailed historical events and personages into an incredibly readable...

    An intensely well-researched book about a little-known (okay, so it was little-known to me, anyway) and fairly bizarre slice of French history. There are a lot of details. Details outside the main story, details that you miiiiiiiight just not care enough about. So I don't think thi...

    I found this quite fascinating. Set in the days of Louis the XIV, Paris was a shambles, and the first Police Chief La Reynie comes into power, to try to establish order in the area. One of his first tasks to fight crime, is to pull the city from darkness. He establishes street lamps th...

    This author did a lot of research, supposedly based on actual historical records, into the more prurient details of French history. This is not a history of the Parisian police. It felt like watching an episode of one of the trashier reality TV programs. There were poisonings, abortion...

    Review: This was a fascinating and well-researched story, but it wasn't told in a particularly engaging way. "Appointed to conquer the ?crime capital of the world,? the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de L...

    I realize this isn't on the author, but I think it's worth noting for interested readers that the publisher made a hash of the branding here. The "police chief" is an ancillary character until the last third of the book, and I think they'd have done better to market this without a prot...

    Between 3 and 4 stars but I?ll round up for the cover art. (I love me some good cover art.) I love this kind of history. Tucker does a phenomenal job of making the setting of 17th century Paris feel real. Her first two paragraphs describe the filth of the city streets before any s...

    Actual rating about 3.5 stars. This book is less strictly about Paris' first police chief, and more about "The Affair of the Poisons," when the aristocrats of France decided the way to solve their problems, financial and otherwise, was to poison people. (1660s and 70s) It was the gr...

    This was an interesting look into the early police procedures in Paris. I was horrified. It's no wonder they had a very bloody revolution. ...

    *I received a review copy from the publisher?thank you! Well researched and at times quite morbid, I found this a compelling read. A historical true crime account that reads like a dark novel, it follows the first police chief of Paris, Nicolas de La Reynie, as he takes on the Af...

    This is a history book that reads like a mystery or thriller. I found the book very hard to put down , and stayed up way past my bedtime in order to finish it. Many of the criminals sound like villains from a storybook, except they were real people who actually did these things, lived ...