All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir

All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir

What does it mean to lose your roots?within your culture, within your family?and what happens when you find them? Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town. From early childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth. She believed that her biolo What does it mean to lose your roots?within your culture, within your family?and what happens when you find t...

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Title:All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir
Author:Nicole Chung
Rating:
Genres:Autobiography
ISBN:All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:240 pages pages

All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir Reviews

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    Nov 09, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

  • Celeste Ng
    Apr 01, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

  • Karen Geiger
    Nov 18, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

    This is a timely and well-written memoir that addresses the issues around mixed race adoptions. Nicole Chung, a Korean American, was adopted as a premature baby by a loving and religious couple in Seattle. They moved to Southern Oregon where she was brought up. Throughout her childhood...

    I?ve never read anything about adoption that taught me so much. I had lots of gaps in my understanding for this process and am grateful for so much that came up. As a mixed kid I related to parts of this book about identity and other parts felt so unfamiliar. Chung is open and bares ...

    The suspense in this memoir makes it compulsively readable; it comes from the question of whether the author will search for her birthparents, and if so, whether she finds them. This plot is further complicated by an unexpected revelation that moves the story forward in a spot where it...

    I think the point of a memoir is to not only tell an interesting story all the way through but to also teach the reader something. Lots of memoirs are filled with pages meant to do just that: fill the pages. Memoirs get a bad rep because people think they can write them, but they can't...

    I?m really surprised this book has such great reviews. The writing is clunky and flat, rendering what could have been a compelling memoir about mixed race adoption, into a very ordinary tale. Having to re-read sentences that simply didn?t flow was super distracting. And at the end ...

  • Mike
    Jun 13, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

  • Vanessa Hua
    Jun 04, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

  • Jessica
    Dec 03, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

  • Karen Ng
    Oct 07, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

    This is a timely and well-written memoir that addresses the issues around mixed race adoptions. Nicole Chung, a Korean American, was adopted as a premature baby by a loving and religious couple in Seattle. They moved to Southern Oregon where she was brought up. Throughout her childhood...

    I?ve never read anything about adoption that taught me so much. I had lots of gaps in my understanding for this process and am grateful for so much that came up. As a mixed kid I related to parts of this book about identity and other parts felt so unfamiliar. Chung is open and bares ...

    The suspense in this memoir makes it compulsively readable; it comes from the question of whether the author will search for her birthparents, and if so, whether she finds them. This plot is further complicated by an unexpected revelation that moves the story forward in a spot where it...

    I think the point of a memoir is to not only tell an interesting story all the way through but to also teach the reader something. Lots of memoirs are filled with pages meant to do just that: fill the pages. Memoirs get a bad rep because people think they can write them, but they can't...

    I?m really surprised this book has such great reviews. The writing is clunky and flat, rendering what could have been a compelling memoir about mixed race adoption, into a very ordinary tale. Having to re-read sentences that simply didn?t flow was super distracting. And at the end ...

    I'm not 100% sure what "a tour de force" means, but I feel like that it makes sense for this book. I didn't know much about Nicole Chung's life other than that she's the editor-in-chief of Catapult's online literary magazine and she's an amazing writer. I knew she was Korean, but the r...

    Moved me to tears so many times. As an Asian that raised three kids in a predominantly white town. I understand a bit of racism and how difficult it was for my children to find their own identitly, but this book, and her prose, are unique. Brutally honest, yet heart breaking at times.A...

  • Michele
    Nov 20, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

    This is a timely and well-written memoir that addresses the issues around mixed race adoptions. Nicole Chung, a Korean American, was adopted as a premature baby by a loving and religious couple in Seattle. They moved to Southern Oregon where she was brought up. Throughout her childhood...

    I?ve never read anything about adoption that taught me so much. I had lots of gaps in my understanding for this process and am grateful for so much that came up. As a mixed kid I related to parts of this book about identity and other parts felt so unfamiliar. Chung is open and bares ...

    The suspense in this memoir makes it compulsively readable; it comes from the question of whether the author will search for her birthparents, and if so, whether she finds them. This plot is further complicated by an unexpected revelation that moves the story forward in a spot where it...

  • Ashley
    Dec 08, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

  • Simone
    Oct 03, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

    This is a timely and well-written memoir that addresses the issues around mixed race adoptions. Nicole Chung, a Korean American, was adopted as a premature baby by a loving and religious couple in Seattle. They moved to Southern Oregon where she was brought up. Throughout her childhood...

    I?ve never read anything about adoption that taught me so much. I had lots of gaps in my understanding for this process and am grateful for so much that came up. As a mixed kid I related to parts of this book about identity and other parts felt so unfamiliar. Chung is open and bares ...

    The suspense in this memoir makes it compulsively readable; it comes from the question of whether the author will search for her birthparents, and if so, whether she finds them. This plot is further complicated by an unexpected revelation that moves the story forward in a spot where it...

    I think the point of a memoir is to not only tell an interesting story all the way through but to also teach the reader something. Lots of memoirs are filled with pages meant to do just that: fill the pages. Memoirs get a bad rep because people think they can write them, but they can't...

    I?m really surprised this book has such great reviews. The writing is clunky and flat, rendering what could have been a compelling memoir about mixed race adoption, into a very ordinary tale. Having to re-read sentences that simply didn?t flow was super distracting. And at the end ...

    I'm not 100% sure what "a tour de force" means, but I feel like that it makes sense for this book. I didn't know much about Nicole Chung's life other than that she's the editor-in-chief of Catapult's online literary magazine and she's an amazing writer. I knew she was Korean, but the r...

  • Misty
    Oct 19, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

  • Traci at The Stacks
    Jan 14, 2019

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

    This is a timely and well-written memoir that addresses the issues around mixed race adoptions. Nicole Chung, a Korean American, was adopted as a premature baby by a loving and religious couple in Seattle. They moved to Southern Oregon where she was brought up. Throughout her childhood...

    I?ve never read anything about adoption that taught me so much. I had lots of gaps in my understanding for this process and am grateful for so much that came up. As a mixed kid I related to parts of this book about identity and other parts felt so unfamiliar. Chung is open and bares ...

  • Canadian Reader
    Dec 09, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

  • Emily
    Apr 25, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

    This is a timely and well-written memoir that addresses the issues around mixed race adoptions. Nicole Chung, a Korean American, was adopted as a premature baby by a loving and religious couple in Seattle. They moved to Southern Oregon where she was brought up. Throughout her childhood...

    I?ve never read anything about adoption that taught me so much. I had lots of gaps in my understanding for this process and am grateful for so much that came up. As a mixed kid I related to parts of this book about identity and other parts felt so unfamiliar. Chung is open and bares ...

    The suspense in this memoir makes it compulsively readable; it comes from the question of whether the author will search for her birthparents, and if so, whether she finds them. This plot is further complicated by an unexpected revelation that moves the story forward in a spot where it...

    I think the point of a memoir is to not only tell an interesting story all the way through but to also teach the reader something. Lots of memoirs are filled with pages meant to do just that: fill the pages. Memoirs get a bad rep because people think they can write them, but they can't...

    I?m really surprised this book has such great reviews. The writing is clunky and flat, rendering what could have been a compelling memoir about mixed race adoption, into a very ordinary tale. Having to re-read sentences that simply didn?t flow was super distracting. And at the end ...

    I'm not 100% sure what "a tour de force" means, but I feel like that it makes sense for this book. I didn't know much about Nicole Chung's life other than that she's the editor-in-chief of Catapult's online literary magazine and she's an amazing writer. I knew she was Korean, but the r...

    Moved me to tears so many times. As an Asian that raised three kids in a predominantly white town. I understand a bit of racism and how difficult it was for my children to find their own identitly, but this book, and her prose, are unique. Brutally honest, yet heart breaking at times.A...

    There's a lot of ink spilled in the lit-o-sphere over the courage it takes to tell your personal story, so much that it's a kind of cliche. Too bad! I'm going to say it: This story is brave. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is a courageous, beautiful book that deserves all the accolades it's goin...

  • Lupita Reads
    Mar 01, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

  • Jessica
    Jun 01, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

    This is a timely and well-written memoir that addresses the issues around mixed race adoptions. Nicole Chung, a Korean American, was adopted as a premature baby by a loving and religious couple in Seattle. They moved to Southern Oregon where she was brought up. Throughout her childhood...

    I?ve never read anything about adoption that taught me so much. I had lots of gaps in my understanding for this process and am grateful for so much that came up. As a mixed kid I related to parts of this book about identity and other parts felt so unfamiliar. Chung is open and bares ...

    The suspense in this memoir makes it compulsively readable; it comes from the question of whether the author will search for her birthparents, and if so, whether she finds them. This plot is further complicated by an unexpected revelation that moves the story forward in a spot where it...

    I think the point of a memoir is to not only tell an interesting story all the way through but to also teach the reader something. Lots of memoirs are filled with pages meant to do just that: fill the pages. Memoirs get a bad rep because people think they can write them, but they can't...

    I?m really surprised this book has such great reviews. The writing is clunky and flat, rendering what could have been a compelling memoir about mixed race adoption, into a very ordinary tale. Having to re-read sentences that simply didn?t flow was super distracting. And at the end ...

    I'm not 100% sure what "a tour de force" means, but I feel like that it makes sense for this book. I didn't know much about Nicole Chung's life other than that she's the editor-in-chief of Catapult's online literary magazine and she's an amazing writer. I knew she was Korean, but the r...

    Moved me to tears so many times. As an Asian that raised three kids in a predominantly white town. I understand a bit of racism and how difficult it was for my children to find their own identitly, but this book, and her prose, are unique. Brutally honest, yet heart breaking at times.A...

    There's a lot of ink spilled in the lit-o-sphere over the courage it takes to tell your personal story, so much that it's a kind of cliche. Too bad! I'm going to say it: This story is brave. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is a courageous, beautiful book that deserves all the accolades it's goin...

    I know I keep saying this about the Asian American debuts I have read this year, but I LOVED this book!! Similar to Julayne Lee?s Not My White Savior, this book taught me so much about Korean adoption and the complex family dynamics in creates. I absolutely loved Nicole?s beautiful...

    This memoir is absolutely stunning. Nicole Chung writes beautifully in a million shades of gray, with nuance, curiosity and so much compassion. This is her story growing up as an adopted Korean-American in a white family and a white community. What shocked and touched me was that she d...

    Such a poignant and moving book, told in such a way that you'll end every page and stop to think about the way you view yourself, and others, and consider the way you live your life. Identity is something we all struggle with in one way or another and to read such an insightful story a...

  • Julie
    Mar 31, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

    This is a timely and well-written memoir that addresses the issues around mixed race adoptions. Nicole Chung, a Korean American, was adopted as a premature baby by a loving and religious couple in Seattle. They moved to Southern Oregon where she was brought up. Throughout her childhood...

    I?ve never read anything about adoption that taught me so much. I had lots of gaps in my understanding for this process and am grateful for so much that came up. As a mixed kid I related to parts of this book about identity and other parts felt so unfamiliar. Chung is open and bares ...

    The suspense in this memoir makes it compulsively readable; it comes from the question of whether the author will search for her birthparents, and if so, whether she finds them. This plot is further complicated by an unexpected revelation that moves the story forward in a spot where it...

    I think the point of a memoir is to not only tell an interesting story all the way through but to also teach the reader something. Lots of memoirs are filled with pages meant to do just that: fill the pages. Memoirs get a bad rep because people think they can write them, but they can't...

    I?m really surprised this book has such great reviews. The writing is clunky and flat, rendering what could have been a compelling memoir about mixed race adoption, into a very ordinary tale. Having to re-read sentences that simply didn?t flow was super distracting. And at the end ...

    I'm not 100% sure what "a tour de force" means, but I feel like that it makes sense for this book. I didn't know much about Nicole Chung's life other than that she's the editor-in-chief of Catapult's online literary magazine and she's an amazing writer. I knew she was Korean, but the r...

    Moved me to tears so many times. As an Asian that raised three kids in a predominantly white town. I understand a bit of racism and how difficult it was for my children to find their own identitly, but this book, and her prose, are unique. Brutally honest, yet heart breaking at times.A...

    There's a lot of ink spilled in the lit-o-sphere over the courage it takes to tell your personal story, so much that it's a kind of cliche. Too bad! I'm going to say it: This story is brave. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is a courageous, beautiful book that deserves all the accolades it's goin...

    I know I keep saying this about the Asian American debuts I have read this year, but I LOVED this book!! Similar to Julayne Lee?s Not My White Savior, this book taught me so much about Korean adoption and the complex family dynamics in creates. I absolutely loved Nicole?s beautiful...

    This memoir is absolutely stunning. Nicole Chung writes beautifully in a million shades of gray, with nuance, curiosity and so much compassion. This is her story growing up as an adopted Korean-American in a white family and a white community. What shocked and touched me was that she d...

    Such a poignant and moving book, told in such a way that you'll end every page and stop to think about the way you view yourself, and others, and consider the way you live your life. Identity is something we all struggle with in one way or another and to read such an insightful story a...

    Edited: Consistently bowled over throughout this read by the empathy and grace with which it treated each of these real life people who make up its story. Memoirs rarely nail this with such balance, and I sincerely appreciated it. Brought me to tears twice, both moments when someon...

  • Jason Diamond
    Sep 03, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

    This is a timely and well-written memoir that addresses the issues around mixed race adoptions. Nicole Chung, a Korean American, was adopted as a premature baby by a loving and religious couple in Seattle. They moved to Southern Oregon where she was brought up. Throughout her childhood...

    I?ve never read anything about adoption that taught me so much. I had lots of gaps in my understanding for this process and am grateful for so much that came up. As a mixed kid I related to parts of this book about identity and other parts felt so unfamiliar. Chung is open and bares ...

    The suspense in this memoir makes it compulsively readable; it comes from the question of whether the author will search for her birthparents, and if so, whether she finds them. This plot is further complicated by an unexpected revelation that moves the story forward in a spot where it...

    I think the point of a memoir is to not only tell an interesting story all the way through but to also teach the reader something. Lots of memoirs are filled with pages meant to do just that: fill the pages. Memoirs get a bad rep because people think they can write them, but they can't...

  • Jessica Woodbury
    Apr 23, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

  • Rebecca
    Sep 24, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

  • Joy
    Jun 09, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

  • Allison
    Sep 03, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

    This is a timely and well-written memoir that addresses the issues around mixed race adoptions. Nicole Chung, a Korean American, was adopted as a premature baby by a loving and religious couple in Seattle. They moved to Southern Oregon where she was brought up. Throughout her childhood...

    I?ve never read anything about adoption that taught me so much. I had lots of gaps in my understanding for this process and am grateful for so much that came up. As a mixed kid I related to parts of this book about identity and other parts felt so unfamiliar. Chung is open and bares ...

    The suspense in this memoir makes it compulsively readable; it comes from the question of whether the author will search for her birthparents, and if so, whether she finds them. This plot is further complicated by an unexpected revelation that moves the story forward in a spot where it...

    I think the point of a memoir is to not only tell an interesting story all the way through but to also teach the reader something. Lots of memoirs are filled with pages meant to do just that: fill the pages. Memoirs get a bad rep because people think they can write them, but they can't...

    I?m really surprised this book has such great reviews. The writing is clunky and flat, rendering what could have been a compelling memoir about mixed race adoption, into a very ordinary tale. Having to re-read sentences that simply didn?t flow was super distracting. And at the end ...

    I'm not 100% sure what "a tour de force" means, but I feel like that it makes sense for this book. I didn't know much about Nicole Chung's life other than that she's the editor-in-chief of Catapult's online literary magazine and she's an amazing writer. I knew she was Korean, but the r...

    Moved me to tears so many times. As an Asian that raised three kids in a predominantly white town. I understand a bit of racism and how difficult it was for my children to find their own identitly, but this book, and her prose, are unique. Brutally honest, yet heart breaking at times.A...

    There's a lot of ink spilled in the lit-o-sphere over the courage it takes to tell your personal story, so much that it's a kind of cliche. Too bad! I'm going to say it: This story is brave. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is a courageous, beautiful book that deserves all the accolades it's goin...

    I know I keep saying this about the Asian American debuts I have read this year, but I LOVED this book!! Similar to Julayne Lee?s Not My White Savior, this book taught me so much about Korean adoption and the complex family dynamics in creates. I absolutely loved Nicole?s beautiful...

    This memoir is absolutely stunning. Nicole Chung writes beautifully in a million shades of gray, with nuance, curiosity and so much compassion. This is her story growing up as an adopted Korean-American in a white family and a white community. What shocked and touched me was that she d...

  • Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)
    Aug 19, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

  • Robert Blumenthal
    Nov 02, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

    This is a timely and well-written memoir that addresses the issues around mixed race adoptions. Nicole Chung, a Korean American, was adopted as a premature baby by a loving and religious couple in Seattle. They moved to Southern Oregon where she was brought up. Throughout her childhood...

  • Christina Grace
    Nov 07, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

  • Sachi Argabright
    Sep 10, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

    Powerful, deeply affecting memoir about love, longing, belonging, and family. An unforgettable debut. ...

    "...it's always a welcome relief to find myself in the company of other adopted people, because only we can understand what it means to grow up adopted." I loved this memoir, for its lovely writing, for its moving story, but most of all, because I could nod along in recognition at s...

    I knew this book was going to be great, but I did not expect that it would make me cry quite so quickly. (For the record, the first tears came on page 16.) What an amazingly honest, open, full-hearted story Nicole Chung has given us about adoption, about heritage, about self-understand...

    Greatest book ever written by one of the greatest living writers ...

    "I finally understood what my birth parents did not: my adoption was hard, and complicated, but it was not a tragedy. It was not my fault, and it wasn?t theirs, either. It was the easiest way to solve just one of too many problems." I basically read this all in one sitting last Sa...

    This is a timely and well-written memoir that addresses the issues around mixed race adoptions. Nicole Chung, a Korean American, was adopted as a premature baby by a loving and religious couple in Seattle. They moved to Southern Oregon where she was brought up. Throughout her childhood...

    I?ve never read anything about adoption that taught me so much. I had lots of gaps in my understanding for this process and am grateful for so much that came up. As a mixed kid I related to parts of this book about identity and other parts felt so unfamiliar. Chung is open and bares ...

    The suspense in this memoir makes it compulsively readable; it comes from the question of whether the author will search for her birthparents, and if so, whether she finds them. This plot is further complicated by an unexpected revelation that moves the story forward in a spot where it...

    I think the point of a memoir is to not only tell an interesting story all the way through but to also teach the reader something. Lots of memoirs are filled with pages meant to do just that: fill the pages. Memoirs get a bad rep because people think they can write them, but they can't...

    I?m really surprised this book has such great reviews. The writing is clunky and flat, rendering what could have been a compelling memoir about mixed race adoption, into a very ordinary tale. Having to re-read sentences that simply didn?t flow was super distracting. And at the end ...

    I'm not 100% sure what "a tour de force" means, but I feel like that it makes sense for this book. I didn't know much about Nicole Chung's life other than that she's the editor-in-chief of Catapult's online literary magazine and she's an amazing writer. I knew she was Korean, but the r...

    Moved me to tears so many times. As an Asian that raised three kids in a predominantly white town. I understand a bit of racism and how difficult it was for my children to find their own identitly, but this book, and her prose, are unique. Brutally honest, yet heart breaking at times.A...

    There's a lot of ink spilled in the lit-o-sphere over the courage it takes to tell your personal story, so much that it's a kind of cliche. Too bad! I'm going to say it: This story is brave. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is a courageous, beautiful book that deserves all the accolades it's goin...

    I know I keep saying this about the Asian American debuts I have read this year, but I LOVED this book!! Similar to Julayne Lee?s Not My White Savior, this book taught me so much about Korean adoption and the complex family dynamics in creates. I absolutely loved Nicole?s beautiful...

  • Paul
    Oct 02, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

  • Dan
    Oct 19, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

    Nicole Chung shares her story of growing up as a transracial adoptee in a small Oregon town where she was often the only person of color. I heard some of her story on the NPR Code Switch podcast (recommended), but didn't know what happened after she looked into her birth parents. She n...

    I'm not usually big on memoirs but when presented with this copy to review, I couldn't say no. A beautifully poignant and emotionally filled memoir of a Korean girl adopted by white parents and facing racism and prejudice no one around her could understand. This journey of her finding ...

    A thoughtful, if discursive, memoir about a Korean-American girl growing up and finding her birth family. It could have been written at about half the length. ...

    Five stars five stars! Because I can?t wait to read this!!!!! ...

    The content is suitable for an essay or a magazine feature piece. There just isn?t enough here for a full-length memoir. The writing is unremarkable, often bland, frequently repetitive, and overly padded. I?m surprised by the high ratings. ...

    After I finished ?All You Can Ever Know,? I wanted to press it into the hands of my loved ones and say, ?This is the book you must read if you want to understand me. THIS is a book finally written for me.? In "All You Can Ever Know," Chung shares her experience as a transrac...

    Nicole Chung?s All You Can Ever Know is a beautifully rendered memoir of family construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. Viewed through a wide-angle lens, Chung challenges her readers to ponder the limits of biological determinism and free will. Viewed through a narrow-angle...

  • Monica Kim: Reader in Emerald City
    Oct 14, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...

    I absolutely adored of Nicole Chung's account of her transracial adoption, which has been popping up on many best-of lists this month. It's legitimately one of the best memoirs I've ever read, and I wrote a master's thesis on memoirs. This book tells a fascinating tale and it does so w...

    Nicole Chung was born premature to Korean shopkeepers who already had two daughters. This was 1981 Seattle, and her parents felt unequal to the challenge of raising a child who might have disabilities. They offered their baby up for adoption, and she was raised by white parents in Port...

    **this review ended up being way too longer than I?d like to, but I had so much to say, so brace yourselves! . . so when people asked me about my family, my features, the fate I?d been dealt, maybe it isn?t surprising how I answered ? first in a childish, cheerful chirrup, ...

  • R.O. Kwon
    Feb 18, 2018

    This book moved me to my very core. As all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it a...

    When I started thinking about how I was going to describe this book, the words that came to mind were the kind of words you'd read on a bottle of water: pure, clear, undiluted. Every time I read it it was like turning on a faucet of raw emotion, a view into the author's experience that...

    An urgent, incandescent exploration of what it can mean to love, and of who gets to belong, in an increasingly divided country. Nicole Chung's powerful All You Can Ever Know is necessary reading, a dazzling light to help lead the way during these times. ...