Doing Harm: The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick

Doing Harm: The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick

In this shocking, hard-hitting expose in the tradition of Naomi Klein and Barbara Ehrenreich, the editorial director of Feministing.com, reveals how gender bias infects every level of medicine and healthcare today?leading to inadequate, inappropriate, and even dangerous treatment that threatens women?s lives and well-being. Maya Dusenbery brings together scientific and soci In this shocking, hard-hitting expose in the tradition of Naomi Klein and Barbara Ehrenreich, the editorial direc...

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Title:Doing Harm: The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick
Author:Maya Dusenbery
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0062470809
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:400 pages pages

Doing Harm: The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick Reviews

  • Dianne
    Jul 05, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

  • Melissa
    Feb 24, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

  • Mickey
    Apr 21, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

  • anaïs
    Mar 17, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

    The MeToo movement has highlighted sexist practices in America today. Thoughts about this is that women knew about it long before the press got hold of it. In general why do women allow these things to happen in the first place? What have we been thinking over the Millenia? Were we thi...

    As a woman with multiple female-dominant medical conditions (most of which were discussed in this book), I'm thrilled this book exists. It's vital that we have this modern examination of sexism in the medical industry. Some of what's in this book I already knew, from prior research and...

    The author discusses how women?s health concerns, especially illnesses which primarily affect females, such as CFS, POTS, and fibromyalgia, are often dismissed as psychosomatic. Better medical education and research directed towards many of these illnesses would help, but our society...

    Wow! Every woman should read this book. This author has done her homework, and recounts the discrimination and negligence on the part of both medical researchers and practitioners when it comes to illnesses that affect mostly women. Although parts of this book made me downright angry, ...

    Dusenberry?s research has so much breadth and depth, and this is probably my favorite nonfiction read of 2018 so far. Necessary reading for understanding healthcare, disease, and gender. ...

    important and timely. should be read by all medical professionals. ...

  • Maya
    May 20, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

  • Julie Barrett
    Jul 09, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

    The MeToo movement has highlighted sexist practices in America today. Thoughts about this is that women knew about it long before the press got hold of it. In general why do women allow these things to happen in the first place? What have we been thinking over the Millenia? Were we thi...

    As a woman with multiple female-dominant medical conditions (most of which were discussed in this book), I'm thrilled this book exists. It's vital that we have this modern examination of sexism in the medical industry. Some of what's in this book I already knew, from prior research and...

    The author discusses how women?s health concerns, especially illnesses which primarily affect females, such as CFS, POTS, and fibromyalgia, are often dismissed as psychosomatic. Better medical education and research directed towards many of these illnesses would help, but our society...

    Wow! Every woman should read this book. This author has done her homework, and recounts the discrimination and negligence on the part of both medical researchers and practitioners when it comes to illnesses that affect mostly women. Although parts of this book made me downright angry, ...

    Dusenberry?s research has so much breadth and depth, and this is probably my favorite nonfiction read of 2018 so far. Necessary reading for understanding healthcare, disease, and gender. ...

    important and timely. should be read by all medical professionals. ...

    Wow! Everyone should read this book - well researched, important, and shocking. ...

    This book...kind of the nutshell review I can give this book is TLDR. I skimmed most the book. I read all of a few chapters in the middle before becoming frustrated with the repetitive feel of the book and skimming again. Each section about different types of illnesses read in a very s...

    A great book.. really challenged me to think differently about pain and other chronic illnesses ...

    "Listen to women. Trust us when we say we're sick. Start there, and you'll find we have a lot of knowledge to share." Good book. Although I have been VERY fortunate (and highly selective) in my mid twenties and later to have NPs and doctors who respect and believe me, I still suffer...

    I learned a lot of infuriating information from this book that will hopefully improve future interactions I have with doctors. I wish, though, that the information had been presented better. It was quite a slog, getting through this book. Lots and lots of facts, many repetitive and wri...

  • Carolyn
    Mar 31, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

    The MeToo movement has highlighted sexist practices in America today. Thoughts about this is that women knew about it long before the press got hold of it. In general why do women allow these things to happen in the first place? What have we been thinking over the Millenia? Were we thi...

    As a woman with multiple female-dominant medical conditions (most of which were discussed in this book), I'm thrilled this book exists. It's vital that we have this modern examination of sexism in the medical industry. Some of what's in this book I already knew, from prior research and...

    The author discusses how women?s health concerns, especially illnesses which primarily affect females, such as CFS, POTS, and fibromyalgia, are often dismissed as psychosomatic. Better medical education and research directed towards many of these illnesses would help, but our society...

    Wow! Every woman should read this book. This author has done her homework, and recounts the discrimination and negligence on the part of both medical researchers and practitioners when it comes to illnesses that affect mostly women. Although parts of this book made me downright angry, ...

    Dusenberry?s research has so much breadth and depth, and this is probably my favorite nonfiction read of 2018 so far. Necessary reading for understanding healthcare, disease, and gender. ...

    important and timely. should be read by all medical professionals. ...

    Wow! Everyone should read this book - well researched, important, and shocking. ...

  • Shaina Robbins
    Aug 31, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

  • Katie
    Sep 08, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

  • Alexis
    Jun 06, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

  • Ashley
    Aug 10, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

    The MeToo movement has highlighted sexist practices in America today. Thoughts about this is that women knew about it long before the press got hold of it. In general why do women allow these things to happen in the first place? What have we been thinking over the Millenia? Were we thi...

    As a woman with multiple female-dominant medical conditions (most of which were discussed in this book), I'm thrilled this book exists. It's vital that we have this modern examination of sexism in the medical industry. Some of what's in this book I already knew, from prior research and...

    The author discusses how women?s health concerns, especially illnesses which primarily affect females, such as CFS, POTS, and fibromyalgia, are often dismissed as psychosomatic. Better medical education and research directed towards many of these illnesses would help, but our society...

    Wow! Every woman should read this book. This author has done her homework, and recounts the discrimination and negligence on the part of both medical researchers and practitioners when it comes to illnesses that affect mostly women. Although parts of this book made me downright angry, ...

    Dusenberry?s research has so much breadth and depth, and this is probably my favorite nonfiction read of 2018 so far. Necessary reading for understanding healthcare, disease, and gender. ...

    important and timely. should be read by all medical professionals. ...

    Wow! Everyone should read this book - well researched, important, and shocking. ...

    This book...kind of the nutshell review I can give this book is TLDR. I skimmed most the book. I read all of a few chapters in the middle before becoming frustrated with the repetitive feel of the book and skimming again. Each section about different types of illnesses read in a very s...

  • Linda
    Sep 26, 2017

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

    The MeToo movement has highlighted sexist practices in America today. Thoughts about this is that women knew about it long before the press got hold of it. In general why do women allow these things to happen in the first place? What have we been thinking over the Millenia? Were we thi...

    As a woman with multiple female-dominant medical conditions (most of which were discussed in this book), I'm thrilled this book exists. It's vital that we have this modern examination of sexism in the medical industry. Some of what's in this book I already knew, from prior research and...

    The author discusses how women?s health concerns, especially illnesses which primarily affect females, such as CFS, POTS, and fibromyalgia, are often dismissed as psychosomatic. Better medical education and research directed towards many of these illnesses would help, but our society...

  • Terri Ehrlich
    Mar 24, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

    The MeToo movement has highlighted sexist practices in America today. Thoughts about this is that women knew about it long before the press got hold of it. In general why do women allow these things to happen in the first place? What have we been thinking over the Millenia? Were we thi...

    As a woman with multiple female-dominant medical conditions (most of which were discussed in this book), I'm thrilled this book exists. It's vital that we have this modern examination of sexism in the medical industry. Some of what's in this book I already knew, from prior research and...

    The author discusses how women?s health concerns, especially illnesses which primarily affect females, such as CFS, POTS, and fibromyalgia, are often dismissed as psychosomatic. Better medical education and research directed towards many of these illnesses would help, but our society...

    Wow! Every woman should read this book. This author has done her homework, and recounts the discrimination and negligence on the part of both medical researchers and practitioners when it comes to illnesses that affect mostly women. Although parts of this book made me downright angry, ...

  • Kitty Galore
    Apr 17, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

    The MeToo movement has highlighted sexist practices in America today. Thoughts about this is that women knew about it long before the press got hold of it. In general why do women allow these things to happen in the first place? What have we been thinking over the Millenia? Were we thi...

  • Alex Linschoten
    Mar 12, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

  • Melissa
    May 20, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

  • DW
    May 05, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

  • Gustavo
    Jun 01, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

  • Pam
    Apr 11, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

  • Chris Pederson
    Aug 20, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

    The MeToo movement has highlighted sexist practices in America today. Thoughts about this is that women knew about it long before the press got hold of it. In general why do women allow these things to happen in the first place? What have we been thinking over the Millenia? Were we thi...

    As a woman with multiple female-dominant medical conditions (most of which were discussed in this book), I'm thrilled this book exists. It's vital that we have this modern examination of sexism in the medical industry. Some of what's in this book I already knew, from prior research and...

    The author discusses how women?s health concerns, especially illnesses which primarily affect females, such as CFS, POTS, and fibromyalgia, are often dismissed as psychosomatic. Better medical education and research directed towards many of these illnesses would help, but our society...

    Wow! Every woman should read this book. This author has done her homework, and recounts the discrimination and negligence on the part of both medical researchers and practitioners when it comes to illnesses that affect mostly women. Although parts of this book made me downright angry, ...

    Dusenberry?s research has so much breadth and depth, and this is probably my favorite nonfiction read of 2018 so far. Necessary reading for understanding healthcare, disease, and gender. ...

    important and timely. should be read by all medical professionals. ...

    Wow! Everyone should read this book - well researched, important, and shocking. ...

    This book...kind of the nutshell review I can give this book is TLDR. I skimmed most the book. I read all of a few chapters in the middle before becoming frustrated with the repetitive feel of the book and skimming again. Each section about different types of illnesses read in a very s...

    A great book.. really challenged me to think differently about pain and other chronic illnesses ...

  • Marianne K
    Apr 15, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

  • Kira Brighton
    Apr 08, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

    The MeToo movement has highlighted sexist practices in America today. Thoughts about this is that women knew about it long before the press got hold of it. In general why do women allow these things to happen in the first place? What have we been thinking over the Millenia? Were we thi...

    As a woman with multiple female-dominant medical conditions (most of which were discussed in this book), I'm thrilled this book exists. It's vital that we have this modern examination of sexism in the medical industry. Some of what's in this book I already knew, from prior research and...

  • Rachel Rickard
    Jun 11, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

    The MeToo movement has highlighted sexist practices in America today. Thoughts about this is that women knew about it long before the press got hold of it. In general why do women allow these things to happen in the first place? What have we been thinking over the Millenia? Were we thi...

    As a woman with multiple female-dominant medical conditions (most of which were discussed in this book), I'm thrilled this book exists. It's vital that we have this modern examination of sexism in the medical industry. Some of what's in this book I already knew, from prior research and...

    The author discusses how women?s health concerns, especially illnesses which primarily affect females, such as CFS, POTS, and fibromyalgia, are often dismissed as psychosomatic. Better medical education and research directed towards many of these illnesses would help, but our society...

    Wow! Every woman should read this book. This author has done her homework, and recounts the discrimination and negligence on the part of both medical researchers and practitioners when it comes to illnesses that affect mostly women. Although parts of this book made me downright angry, ...

    Dusenberry?s research has so much breadth and depth, and this is probably my favorite nonfiction read of 2018 so far. Necessary reading for understanding healthcare, disease, and gender. ...

  • Zia Okocha
    Jul 11, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

  • Busy
    May 31, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

    The MeToo movement has highlighted sexist practices in America today. Thoughts about this is that women knew about it long before the press got hold of it. In general why do women allow these things to happen in the first place? What have we been thinking over the Millenia? Were we thi...

    As a woman with multiple female-dominant medical conditions (most of which were discussed in this book), I'm thrilled this book exists. It's vital that we have this modern examination of sexism in the medical industry. Some of what's in this book I already knew, from prior research and...

    The author discusses how women?s health concerns, especially illnesses which primarily affect females, such as CFS, POTS, and fibromyalgia, are often dismissed as psychosomatic. Better medical education and research directed towards many of these illnesses would help, but our society...

    Wow! Every woman should read this book. This author has done her homework, and recounts the discrimination and negligence on the part of both medical researchers and practitioners when it comes to illnesses that affect mostly women. Although parts of this book made me downright angry, ...

    Dusenberry?s research has so much breadth and depth, and this is probably my favorite nonfiction read of 2018 so far. Necessary reading for understanding healthcare, disease, and gender. ...

    important and timely. should be read by all medical professionals. ...

    Wow! Everyone should read this book - well researched, important, and shocking. ...

    This book...kind of the nutshell review I can give this book is TLDR. I skimmed most the book. I read all of a few chapters in the middle before becoming frustrated with the repetitive feel of the book and skimming again. Each section about different types of illnesses read in a very s...

    A great book.. really challenged me to think differently about pain and other chronic illnesses ...

    "Listen to women. Trust us when we say we're sick. Start there, and you'll find we have a lot of knowledge to share." Good book. Although I have been VERY fortunate (and highly selective) in my mid twenties and later to have NPs and doctors who respect and believe me, I still suffer...

  • ❤
    May 22, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

  • Wendy
    Apr 12, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

  • Alyssa Foll
    Mar 20, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

  • Sara Kalucza
    Jul 25, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

  • Aubrey
    Sep 02, 2018

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the med...

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the sa...

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system. ...

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and fo...

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously." If you are a woman, have a body and go ...

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment system...

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women?s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Du...

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past? ...

    A repetitive look at gender-bias in the doctor/ patient relationship. Having experienced this firsthand, I certainly agreed with the premise. I almost bailed in the introduction as the author had so many liberal views that I do not subscribe to, "... nature is a lot more diverse than t...

    Important and heartbreaking. The lengths to which a woman must advocate for her own care is ridiculous. Every health provider needs to read this book, even if they think they treat all patients the same (because guess what - they probably don?t). ...

    Forthcoming. If you?re going into/already in science or medicine OR if you support feminism (hopefully everyone), this book is an important siren call for bias awareness. ...

    Much of the book focuses on anecdotes of doctors dismissing womens' symptoms simply because the patients are women. "Before [the twentieth century], doctors had no choice but to take patients at their word about what they were experiencing in their bodies." p 69 However, "I spoke to a ...

    "When it comes to 'active' life expectancy - the number of years living free from significant limitations that prevent you from doing everyday tasks - men have overtaken women in the past three decades. Women still live longer, but men live better longer." (20) "The medical communit...

    Infuriating and terrifying. Why is it so hard to believe women? ...

    Albeit a bit repetetive at spots, this is a great and infuriating odyssey through gender bias in the medical world. I think the repetetativeness could actually be helpful for people whit specific interests in certain chapters, pertaining to their own illnesses and experiences. I could ...

    This book was a very difficult read for me because nearly every page filled me with outrage. Anyone who has gone to the doctor while female will recognize some of the ways that women's suffering has been ignored, dismissed, and marginalized, often leading to delayed diagnoses, addition...

    This is an important book on the gender gap in medicine. Maya Dusenbery identifies two main gaps: the knowledge gap and the trust gap. Medicine still lags in including women in clinical trials and in researching conditions that occur only in, more frequently in, or differently in women...

    There?s not really much else for me to say other than this book really opened my eyes to a lot of issues that I hadn?t known even EXISTED in the medical community and that?s entirely because of the fact that I?m male and identify as a man. As I read the first couple sections of...

    The MeToo movement has highlighted sexist practices in America today. Thoughts about this is that women knew about it long before the press got hold of it. In general why do women allow these things to happen in the first place? What have we been thinking over the Millenia? Were we thi...

    As a woman with multiple female-dominant medical conditions (most of which were discussed in this book), I'm thrilled this book exists. It's vital that we have this modern examination of sexism in the medical industry. Some of what's in this book I already knew, from prior research and...

    The author discusses how women?s health concerns, especially illnesses which primarily affect females, such as CFS, POTS, and fibromyalgia, are often dismissed as psychosomatic. Better medical education and research directed towards many of these illnesses would help, but our society...

    Wow! Every woman should read this book. This author has done her homework, and recounts the discrimination and negligence on the part of both medical researchers and practitioners when it comes to illnesses that affect mostly women. Although parts of this book made me downright angry, ...

    Dusenberry?s research has so much breadth and depth, and this is probably my favorite nonfiction read of 2018 so far. Necessary reading for understanding healthcare, disease, and gender. ...

    important and timely. should be read by all medical professionals. ...

    Wow! Everyone should read this book - well researched, important, and shocking. ...

    This book...kind of the nutshell review I can give this book is TLDR. I skimmed most the book. I read all of a few chapters in the middle before becoming frustrated with the repetitive feel of the book and skimming again. Each section about different types of illnesses read in a very s...

    A great book.. really challenged me to think differently about pain and other chronic illnesses ...

    "Listen to women. Trust us when we say we're sick. Start there, and you'll find we have a lot of knowledge to share." Good book. Although I have been VERY fortunate (and highly selective) in my mid twenties and later to have NPs and doctors who respect and believe me, I still suffer...

    I learned a lot of infuriating information from this book that will hopefully improve future interactions I have with doctors. I wish, though, that the information had been presented better. It was quite a slog, getting through this book. Lots and lots of facts, many repetitive and wri...

    This terrifying and eye-opening book is a must-read for any female or any person in the medical field. Although it is not a particularly enjoyable book, it is well-written and extremely insightful. I found myself revisiting every encounter I've had with a medical professional and feeli...