Sluta aldrig gå - Från gatan i Sao Paulo till Vindeln i Norrland

Sluta aldrig gå - Från gatan i Sao Paulo till Vindeln i Norrland

?Jag r fdd i Brasiliens vildmark och bodde i en grotta tills jag var ungefr fem r gammal. Drefter flyttade min mamma och jag in till en av So Paulos mnga kkstder ? en rent livsfarlig milj fr ett barn att vxa upp i. Jag fick tidigt lra mig att inte lita p polisen eller andra vuxna. Ofta fick jag klara mig sjlv och jag fick ven ansvara fr min lillebror innan ?Jag r fdd i Brasiliens vildmark och bodde i en grotta tills jag var ungefr fem r gammal. ...

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Title:Sluta aldrig gå - Från gatan i Sao Paulo till Vindeln i Norrland
Author:Christina Rickardsson
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
Edition Language:Swedish
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:240 pages pages

Sluta aldrig gå - Från gatan i Sao Paulo till Vindeln i Norrland Reviews

  • Abby
    May 28, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

    Brace yourself, because this book can do things to your heart and mind. The author, Christina Rickardsson, was born in a small village in Brazil. She, her baby brother Patrick, and her mother were desperately poor and lived in a cave, in the slums, or on the streets. They begged for fo...

    This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What ...

    Vilken underbar bok. Jag fick den av min gamla lrare som sa att jag bara mste lsa den s han kpte den till mig. Det r jag vldigt tacksam fr. Hela boken blev en resa, en resa som berrde mycket. Jag kom p mig med att tnka p den nr jag var ute och joggade, stod i ...

    Your pages will keep turning as the author keeps walking... I was completely taken in by this book page by page wanting to know what happened next and yet inside I was thinking how I wish I could make the story become less horrifying for the author to have endured. However there wer...

    As a child Christiana/Christine lived in the jungle and on the streets of Brazil. The life she lived there is horrific and shocking. The level of violence she endured is unimaginable to me. At 8, she is adopted to a loving family in Sweden. Although this turns out to be a good thing, t...

    A life story worth reading I am at a loss as to how to describe how fascinating, valuable and incredible this memoir is. As an adoptive parent, who adopted older children, this was invaluable to help me consider their perspective. As a person concerned with at risk children, it was ...

    This is such a fascinating story and should be a must-read, especially for people who have never traveled to poor countries (or poor areas of their own countries.) It's amazing what a person can live through and come out alive and actually sane on the other side. I'm in awe of how Chri...

    A memoir of a street kid from Brazil adopted by a Swedish family This was not always easy to read, but well worth the effort. It tells of how a Swedish young woman tries to unite her Brazilian childhood of poverty with her adopted life as s Swedish adult. It is a work of trying to ...

    Amazing and thought-provoking story about a girl who grew up as a street child in Sao Paolo, Brazil, and at age 8 was adopted to a Swedish family. Now she is telling her story and working on making a difference in the world. ...

    This book was absolutely fascinating to me. I had to keep reminding myself that the author is only a few years younger than me, because it seemed so unbelievable that at the same time I was living a comfortable life in the US, she was scrounging for scraps of food in Brazil. Very eye-o...

    Interesting I understood what the author was trying to convey by sharing her story. I did get that and that was her goal. And that is wonderful. But the story felt like it stuttered along. Trying to give enough detail to her story to paint the picture but not so much as to lose the ...

    As an adoptive parent of kids who knew and could remembertheir families, the author?s account of that transition echoed some of what my kids went though, and maybe more than I realized. Her account of her life in the favelas was gripping, as well as shocking. Her account of her earli...

  • Jenn
    May 31, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

    Brace yourself, because this book can do things to your heart and mind. The author, Christina Rickardsson, was born in a small village in Brazil. She, her baby brother Patrick, and her mother were desperately poor and lived in a cave, in the slums, or on the streets. They begged for fo...

    This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What ...

    Vilken underbar bok. Jag fick den av min gamla lrare som sa att jag bara mste lsa den s han kpte den till mig. Det r jag vldigt tacksam fr. Hela boken blev en resa, en resa som berrde mycket. Jag kom p mig med att tnka p den nr jag var ute och joggade, stod i ...

    Your pages will keep turning as the author keeps walking... I was completely taken in by this book page by page wanting to know what happened next and yet inside I was thinking how I wish I could make the story become less horrifying for the author to have endured. However there wer...

    As a child Christiana/Christine lived in the jungle and on the streets of Brazil. The life she lived there is horrific and shocking. The level of violence she endured is unimaginable to me. At 8, she is adopted to a loving family in Sweden. Although this turns out to be a good thing, t...

    A life story worth reading I am at a loss as to how to describe how fascinating, valuable and incredible this memoir is. As an adoptive parent, who adopted older children, this was invaluable to help me consider their perspective. As a person concerned with at risk children, it was ...

    This is such a fascinating story and should be a must-read, especially for people who have never traveled to poor countries (or poor areas of their own countries.) It's amazing what a person can live through and come out alive and actually sane on the other side. I'm in awe of how Chri...

    A memoir of a street kid from Brazil adopted by a Swedish family This was not always easy to read, but well worth the effort. It tells of how a Swedish young woman tries to unite her Brazilian childhood of poverty with her adopted life as s Swedish adult. It is a work of trying to ...

    Amazing and thought-provoking story about a girl who grew up as a street child in Sao Paolo, Brazil, and at age 8 was adopted to a Swedish family. Now she is telling her story and working on making a difference in the world. ...

    This book was absolutely fascinating to me. I had to keep reminding myself that the author is only a few years younger than me, because it seemed so unbelievable that at the same time I was living a comfortable life in the US, she was scrounging for scraps of food in Brazil. Very eye-o...

  • Urenna Sander
    May 10, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

  • Stephanie
    May 12, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

  • jose coimbra
    Apr 21, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

  • Amanda
    May 20, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

  • Hillary
    May 31, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

    Brace yourself, because this book can do things to your heart and mind. The author, Christina Rickardsson, was born in a small village in Brazil. She, her baby brother Patrick, and her mother were desperately poor and lived in a cave, in the slums, or on the streets. They begged for fo...

    This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What ...

  • Tifani
    Jun 05, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

  • Heather
    Jun 05, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

  • Mariamosh
    Feb 23, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

  • Eileen Prussman
    May 31, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

  • Andy Roberts
    May 15, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

  • Donna
    Dec 02, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

    Brace yourself, because this book can do things to your heart and mind. The author, Christina Rickardsson, was born in a small village in Brazil. She, her baby brother Patrick, and her mother were desperately poor and lived in a cave, in the slums, or on the streets. They begged for fo...

  • Kristi Duarte
    Jun 05, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

    Brace yourself, because this book can do things to your heart and mind. The author, Christina Rickardsson, was born in a small village in Brazil. She, her baby brother Patrick, and her mother were desperately poor and lived in a cave, in the slums, or on the streets. They begged for fo...

    This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What ...

    Vilken underbar bok. Jag fick den av min gamla lrare som sa att jag bara mste lsa den s han kpte den till mig. Det r jag vldigt tacksam fr. Hela boken blev en resa, en resa som berrde mycket. Jag kom p mig med att tnka p den nr jag var ute och joggade, stod i ...

    Your pages will keep turning as the author keeps walking... I was completely taken in by this book page by page wanting to know what happened next and yet inside I was thinking how I wish I could make the story become less horrifying for the author to have endured. However there wer...

    As a child Christiana/Christine lived in the jungle and on the streets of Brazil. The life she lived there is horrific and shocking. The level of violence she endured is unimaginable to me. At 8, she is adopted to a loving family in Sweden. Although this turns out to be a good thing, t...

    A life story worth reading I am at a loss as to how to describe how fascinating, valuable and incredible this memoir is. As an adoptive parent, who adopted older children, this was invaluable to help me consider their perspective. As a person concerned with at risk children, it was ...

    This is such a fascinating story and should be a must-read, especially for people who have never traveled to poor countries (or poor areas of their own countries.) It's amazing what a person can live through and come out alive and actually sane on the other side. I'm in awe of how Chri...

  • Harry
    May 24, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

  • Hanna Bylund
    Oct 16, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

    Brace yourself, because this book can do things to your heart and mind. The author, Christina Rickardsson, was born in a small village in Brazil. She, her baby brother Patrick, and her mother were desperately poor and lived in a cave, in the slums, or on the streets. They begged for fo...

    This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What ...

    Vilken underbar bok. Jag fick den av min gamla lrare som sa att jag bara mste lsa den s han kpte den till mig. Det r jag vldigt tacksam fr. Hela boken blev en resa, en resa som berrde mycket. Jag kom p mig med att tnka p den nr jag var ute och joggade, stod i ...

  • Cynthia
    May 24, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

  • LKay
    May 29, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

    Brace yourself, because this book can do things to your heart and mind. The author, Christina Rickardsson, was born in a small village in Brazil. She, her baby brother Patrick, and her mother were desperately poor and lived in a cave, in the slums, or on the streets. They begged for fo...

    This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What ...

    Vilken underbar bok. Jag fick den av min gamla lrare som sa att jag bara mste lsa den s han kpte den till mig. Det r jag vldigt tacksam fr. Hela boken blev en resa, en resa som berrde mycket. Jag kom p mig med att tnka p den nr jag var ute och joggade, stod i ...

    Your pages will keep turning as the author keeps walking... I was completely taken in by this book page by page wanting to know what happened next and yet inside I was thinking how I wish I could make the story become less horrifying for the author to have endured. However there wer...

    As a child Christiana/Christine lived in the jungle and on the streets of Brazil. The life she lived there is horrific and shocking. The level of violence she endured is unimaginable to me. At 8, she is adopted to a loving family in Sweden. Although this turns out to be a good thing, t...

    A life story worth reading I am at a loss as to how to describe how fascinating, valuable and incredible this memoir is. As an adoptive parent, who adopted older children, this was invaluable to help me consider their perspective. As a person concerned with at risk children, it was ...

    This is such a fascinating story and should be a must-read, especially for people who have never traveled to poor countries (or poor areas of their own countries.) It's amazing what a person can live through and come out alive and actually sane on the other side. I'm in awe of how Chri...

    A memoir of a street kid from Brazil adopted by a Swedish family This was not always easy to read, but well worth the effort. It tells of how a Swedish young woman tries to unite her Brazilian childhood of poverty with her adopted life as s Swedish adult. It is a work of trying to ...

    Amazing and thought-provoking story about a girl who grew up as a street child in Sao Paolo, Brazil, and at age 8 was adopted to a Swedish family. Now she is telling her story and working on making a difference in the world. ...

    This book was absolutely fascinating to me. I had to keep reminding myself that the author is only a few years younger than me, because it seemed so unbelievable that at the same time I was living a comfortable life in the US, she was scrounging for scraps of food in Brazil. Very eye-o...

    Interesting I understood what the author was trying to convey by sharing her story. I did get that and that was her goal. And that is wonderful. But the story felt like it stuttered along. Trying to give enough detail to her story to paint the picture but not so much as to lose the ...

  • Greta Samuelson
    May 17, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

  • Meg Leader
    May 18, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

  • Kellie
    Jun 01, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

    Brace yourself, because this book can do things to your heart and mind. The author, Christina Rickardsson, was born in a small village in Brazil. She, her baby brother Patrick, and her mother were desperately poor and lived in a cave, in the slums, or on the streets. They begged for fo...

    This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What ...

    Vilken underbar bok. Jag fick den av min gamla lrare som sa att jag bara mste lsa den s han kpte den till mig. Det r jag vldigt tacksam fr. Hela boken blev en resa, en resa som berrde mycket. Jag kom p mig med att tnka p den nr jag var ute och joggade, stod i ...

    Your pages will keep turning as the author keeps walking... I was completely taken in by this book page by page wanting to know what happened next and yet inside I was thinking how I wish I could make the story become less horrifying for the author to have endured. However there wer...

    As a child Christiana/Christine lived in the jungle and on the streets of Brazil. The life she lived there is horrific and shocking. The level of violence she endured is unimaginable to me. At 8, she is adopted to a loving family in Sweden. Although this turns out to be a good thing, t...

    A life story worth reading I am at a loss as to how to describe how fascinating, valuable and incredible this memoir is. As an adoptive parent, who adopted older children, this was invaluable to help me consider their perspective. As a person concerned with at risk children, it was ...

  • Jacqueline
    Jun 01, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

    Brace yourself, because this book can do things to your heart and mind. The author, Christina Rickardsson, was born in a small village in Brazil. She, her baby brother Patrick, and her mother were desperately poor and lived in a cave, in the slums, or on the streets. They begged for fo...

    This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What ...

    Vilken underbar bok. Jag fick den av min gamla lrare som sa att jag bara mste lsa den s han kpte den till mig. Det r jag vldigt tacksam fr. Hela boken blev en resa, en resa som berrde mycket. Jag kom p mig med att tnka p den nr jag var ute och joggade, stod i ...

    Your pages will keep turning as the author keeps walking... I was completely taken in by this book page by page wanting to know what happened next and yet inside I was thinking how I wish I could make the story become less horrifying for the author to have endured. However there wer...

  • Debbie Carlson
    May 28, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

  • Tuvia Pollack
    Jun 02, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

    Brace yourself, because this book can do things to your heart and mind. The author, Christina Rickardsson, was born in a small village in Brazil. She, her baby brother Patrick, and her mother were desperately poor and lived in a cave, in the slums, or on the streets. They begged for fo...

    This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What ...

    Vilken underbar bok. Jag fick den av min gamla lrare som sa att jag bara mste lsa den s han kpte den till mig. Det r jag vldigt tacksam fr. Hela boken blev en resa, en resa som berrde mycket. Jag kom p mig med att tnka p den nr jag var ute och joggade, stod i ...

    Your pages will keep turning as the author keeps walking... I was completely taken in by this book page by page wanting to know what happened next and yet inside I was thinking how I wish I could make the story become less horrifying for the author to have endured. However there wer...

    As a child Christiana/Christine lived in the jungle and on the streets of Brazil. The life she lived there is horrific and shocking. The level of violence she endured is unimaginable to me. At 8, she is adopted to a loving family in Sweden. Although this turns out to be a good thing, t...

    A life story worth reading I am at a loss as to how to describe how fascinating, valuable and incredible this memoir is. As an adoptive parent, who adopted older children, this was invaluable to help me consider their perspective. As a person concerned with at risk children, it was ...

    This is such a fascinating story and should be a must-read, especially for people who have never traveled to poor countries (or poor areas of their own countries.) It's amazing what a person can live through and come out alive and actually sane on the other side. I'm in awe of how Chri...

    A memoir of a street kid from Brazil adopted by a Swedish family This was not always easy to read, but well worth the effort. It tells of how a Swedish young woman tries to unite her Brazilian childhood of poverty with her adopted life as s Swedish adult. It is a work of trying to ...

    Amazing and thought-provoking story about a girl who grew up as a street child in Sao Paolo, Brazil, and at age 8 was adopted to a Swedish family. Now she is telling her story and working on making a difference in the world. ...

  • Patty S.
    May 31, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

    Brace yourself, because this book can do things to your heart and mind. The author, Christina Rickardsson, was born in a small village in Brazil. She, her baby brother Patrick, and her mother were desperately poor and lived in a cave, in the slums, or on the streets. They begged for fo...

    This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What ...

    Vilken underbar bok. Jag fick den av min gamla lrare som sa att jag bara mste lsa den s han kpte den till mig. Det r jag vldigt tacksam fr. Hela boken blev en resa, en resa som berrde mycket. Jag kom p mig med att tnka p den nr jag var ute och joggade, stod i ...

    Your pages will keep turning as the author keeps walking... I was completely taken in by this book page by page wanting to know what happened next and yet inside I was thinking how I wish I could make the story become less horrifying for the author to have endured. However there wer...

    As a child Christiana/Christine lived in the jungle and on the streets of Brazil. The life she lived there is horrific and shocking. The level of violence she endured is unimaginable to me. At 8, she is adopted to a loving family in Sweden. Although this turns out to be a good thing, t...

    A life story worth reading I am at a loss as to how to describe how fascinating, valuable and incredible this memoir is. As an adoptive parent, who adopted older children, this was invaluable to help me consider their perspective. As a person concerned with at risk children, it was ...

    This is such a fascinating story and should be a must-read, especially for people who have never traveled to poor countries (or poor areas of their own countries.) It's amazing what a person can live through and come out alive and actually sane on the other side. I'm in awe of how Chri...

    A memoir of a street kid from Brazil adopted by a Swedish family This was not always easy to read, but well worth the effort. It tells of how a Swedish young woman tries to unite her Brazilian childhood of poverty with her adopted life as s Swedish adult. It is a work of trying to ...

  • Iso Melo
    Nov 06, 2017

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

  • Sandi Dickenson
    May 04, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

  • Goth Gone Grey
    May 02, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

  • Kristy
    May 23, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

  • Mobeme53 Branson
    May 31, 2018

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed ...

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the Histor...

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scar...

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, ne Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers...

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn?t fully grasp what she had done ...

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go f...

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply f...

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what...

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving h...

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common a...

    Snudd p en femma hr. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Lsa. Ett oerhrt starkt de, en oerhrt stark berttelse. Ls den. ...

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she en...

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to ...

    Cristina nos narra em suas memrias a experincia de sua vida no Brasil at os oito anos de idade, quando ento teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia tambm de seu irmo, que estava com dois anos poca. O livro gira em torno da busca da au...

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I?m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or a...

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. Howe...

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don?t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn?t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation. ...

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil. The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food. ...

    Brace yourself, because this book can do things to your heart and mind. The author, Christina Rickardsson, was born in a small village in Brazil. She, her baby brother Patrick, and her mother were desperately poor and lived in a cave, in the slums, or on the streets. They begged for fo...

    This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What ...

    Vilken underbar bok. Jag fick den av min gamla lrare som sa att jag bara mste lsa den s han kpte den till mig. Det r jag vldigt tacksam fr. Hela boken blev en resa, en resa som berrde mycket. Jag kom p mig med att tnka p den nr jag var ute och joggade, stod i ...

    Your pages will keep turning as the author keeps walking... I was completely taken in by this book page by page wanting to know what happened next and yet inside I was thinking how I wish I could make the story become less horrifying for the author to have endured. However there wer...

    As a child Christiana/Christine lived in the jungle and on the streets of Brazil. The life she lived there is horrific and shocking. The level of violence she endured is unimaginable to me. At 8, she is adopted to a loving family in Sweden. Although this turns out to be a good thing, t...