Open Heart: A Cardiac Surgeon's Stories of Life and Death on the Operating Table

Open Heart: A Cardiac Surgeon's Stories of Life and Death on the Operating Table

One of the world's leading heart surgeons shares the hard-won lessons of a life lived where failure and death are just a heartbeat away When Stephen Westaby witnessed a patient die on the table during an open heart surgery for the first time, he was struck by the quiet, determined way the surgeons walked away. As he soon understood, this detachment was a crucial survival st One of the world's leading heart surgeons shares the hard-won lessons of a life lived where failure and death are jus...

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Title:Open Heart: A Cardiac Surgeon's Stories of Life and Death on the Operating Table
Author:Stephen Westaby
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:046509483X
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:304 pages pages

Open Heart: A Cardiac Surgeon's Stories of Life and Death on the Operating Table Reviews

  • John Devlin
    Dec 26, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

    Stephen's book very accurately represents him - iconoclastic, innovative, brilliant, revolutionary, single-minded, determined, inspirational - but also egotistical, sometimes arrogant, difficult and prone to alienate colleagues. I was CEO in Oxford when the first Jarvik 2000 was put in...

    I'm a sucker for cardiology books but this one is fast-paced and.highly interesting. It is a testament to the dedication of pioneering doctors/cardiologists without whose value of innovation and life, I, personally, and countless others would not be here today. Prof Stephen Westaby wri...

    While I work in the medical field, this was a hard book to get into. It had a lot of information, and was very wordy. I enjoyed the book, but for the non-medical person, it may be "a lot". I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads but it has no bearing on the rating ...

    This is a good read for anyone who has a fascination with hearts, whether you're a medical student, a patient with heart issues, or a parent of someone with heart issues. I was personally drawn to this book because my youngest daughter was born with complex congenital heart defects, an...

    Heart rending, heart wrenching, heart tugging. What?s more DrWestaby saves his greatest venom for socialized medicine. Lamenting how costs and bureaucracy have taken the light out of surgery and seriously imperiled the number of cardiac surgeons in England. ...

  • Kirsty
    Jul 24, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

    Stephen's book very accurately represents him - iconoclastic, innovative, brilliant, revolutionary, single-minded, determined, inspirational - but also egotistical, sometimes arrogant, difficult and prone to alienate colleagues. I was CEO in Oxford when the first Jarvik 2000 was put in...

    I'm a sucker for cardiology books but this one is fast-paced and.highly interesting. It is a testament to the dedication of pioneering doctors/cardiologists without whose value of innovation and life, I, personally, and countless others would not be here today. Prof Stephen Westaby wri...

    While I work in the medical field, this was a hard book to get into. It had a lot of information, and was very wordy. I enjoyed the book, but for the non-medical person, it may be "a lot". I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads but it has no bearing on the rating ...

    This is a good read for anyone who has a fascination with hearts, whether you're a medical student, a patient with heart issues, or a parent of someone with heart issues. I was personally drawn to this book because my youngest daughter was born with complex congenital heart defects, an...

    Heart rending, heart wrenching, heart tugging. What?s more DrWestaby saves his greatest venom for socialized medicine. Lamenting how costs and bureaucracy have taken the light out of surgery and seriously imperiled the number of cardiac surgeons in England. ...

    Would give more than 5star if I could, this is my kind of book! This book lines up perfectly with some of my other favorite medical memoir (Dr Marsh, Kalanthi, and some others). Loved the deeply personal stories, some with good outcomes, and some with bad. The author has been doubly bl...

    So moving. Its a non-fiction book which tells its stories like a thriller. Its so good that after reading a library copy, I just had to order a hard copy online to be re-read in the future. I will probably still need the tissue box. ...

    You are taken on a roller coaster journey of a pioneering and very talented heart surgeon. After giving a brief account of why and how Westaby became a surgeon each chapter tells a story of some very gutsy decisions and radical techniques. We never know till the end of the chapter whet...

    Its not a kind of book I would normally read, but surprisingly I enjoyed it very much. Its well written and very educating. The stories are experience based which make it more intriguing to read. 5 stars for this book! ...

    Won this in a Goodreads giveaway, and I'm so glad I did! A fascinating, sad and sometimes painful insight into the life and work of a heart surgeon. Triumph and tragedy go hand in hand and it was sometimes excruciating to read about how the heroic efforts of the surgeon and his team ca...

    A true insight into the hardships and miracles of cardiac surgery! The perfect balance, in my opinion, of scientific/medical jargon and explanative english. As an a-level student I didn't feel at all overwhelmed while reading this as it has been written in such a way as to cater for va...

    I loved this book! I have so much respect for anyone in the medical profession and, frankly, I'm in awe of surgeons, especially cardiac surgeons and neurosurgeons. Day after day these men and women literally take people's lives in their hands and, while in many jobs if you make a mista...

  • Alex
    Jul 14, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

  • Petra X
    Apr 24, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

  • Jo
    Jan 24, 2018

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

  • Ellie
    Feb 12, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

  • Julie
    Aug 17, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

  • TL
    Sep 21, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

  • Joanna
    Jan 30, 2018

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

  • Rebecca Foster
    Mar 15, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

  • Linda Kelly
    Mar 08, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

    Stephen's book very accurately represents him - iconoclastic, innovative, brilliant, revolutionary, single-minded, determined, inspirational - but also egotistical, sometimes arrogant, difficult and prone to alienate colleagues. I was CEO in Oxford when the first Jarvik 2000 was put in...

    I'm a sucker for cardiology books but this one is fast-paced and.highly interesting. It is a testament to the dedication of pioneering doctors/cardiologists without whose value of innovation and life, I, personally, and countless others would not be here today. Prof Stephen Westaby wri...

    While I work in the medical field, this was a hard book to get into. It had a lot of information, and was very wordy. I enjoyed the book, but for the non-medical person, it may be "a lot". I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads but it has no bearing on the rating ...

    This is a good read for anyone who has a fascination with hearts, whether you're a medical student, a patient with heart issues, or a parent of someone with heart issues. I was personally drawn to this book because my youngest daughter was born with complex congenital heart defects, an...

    Heart rending, heart wrenching, heart tugging. What?s more DrWestaby saves his greatest venom for socialized medicine. Lamenting how costs and bureaucracy have taken the light out of surgery and seriously imperiled the number of cardiac surgeons in England. ...

    Would give more than 5star if I could, this is my kind of book! This book lines up perfectly with some of my other favorite medical memoir (Dr Marsh, Kalanthi, and some others). Loved the deeply personal stories, some with good outcomes, and some with bad. The author has been doubly bl...

    So moving. Its a non-fiction book which tells its stories like a thriller. Its so good that after reading a library copy, I just had to order a hard copy online to be re-read in the future. I will probably still need the tissue box. ...

    You are taken on a roller coaster journey of a pioneering and very talented heart surgeon. After giving a brief account of why and how Westaby became a surgeon each chapter tells a story of some very gutsy decisions and radical techniques. We never know till the end of the chapter whet...

    Its not a kind of book I would normally read, but surprisingly I enjoyed it very much. Its well written and very educating. The stories are experience based which make it more intriguing to read. 5 stars for this book! ...

    Won this in a Goodreads giveaway, and I'm so glad I did! A fascinating, sad and sometimes painful insight into the life and work of a heart surgeon. Triumph and tragedy go hand in hand and it was sometimes excruciating to read about how the heroic efforts of the surgeon and his team ca...

  • Kate~Bibliophile Book Club
    Feb 06, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

  • Laura
    Feb 08, 2018

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

  • Jackie Law
    Feb 07, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

  • Dkettmann
    Jun 23, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

    Stephen's book very accurately represents him - iconoclastic, innovative, brilliant, revolutionary, single-minded, determined, inspirational - but also egotistical, sometimes arrogant, difficult and prone to alienate colleagues. I was CEO in Oxford when the first Jarvik 2000 was put in...

    I'm a sucker for cardiology books but this one is fast-paced and.highly interesting. It is a testament to the dedication of pioneering doctors/cardiologists without whose value of innovation and life, I, personally, and countless others would not be here today. Prof Stephen Westaby wri...

    While I work in the medical field, this was a hard book to get into. It had a lot of information, and was very wordy. I enjoyed the book, but for the non-medical person, it may be "a lot". I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads but it has no bearing on the rating ...

    This is a good read for anyone who has a fascination with hearts, whether you're a medical student, a patient with heart issues, or a parent of someone with heart issues. I was personally drawn to this book because my youngest daughter was born with complex congenital heart defects, an...

    Heart rending, heart wrenching, heart tugging. What?s more DrWestaby saves his greatest venom for socialized medicine. Lamenting how costs and bureaucracy have taken the light out of surgery and seriously imperiled the number of cardiac surgeons in England. ...

    Would give more than 5star if I could, this is my kind of book! This book lines up perfectly with some of my other favorite medical memoir (Dr Marsh, Kalanthi, and some others). Loved the deeply personal stories, some with good outcomes, and some with bad. The author has been doubly bl...

  • Sharon Barrow Wilfong
    Jan 16, 2018

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

  • Sean Goh
    Jun 05, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

  • Serena Aurora Vardan
    Jun 20, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

    Stephen's book very accurately represents him - iconoclastic, innovative, brilliant, revolutionary, single-minded, determined, inspirational - but also egotistical, sometimes arrogant, difficult and prone to alienate colleagues. I was CEO in Oxford when the first Jarvik 2000 was put in...

    I'm a sucker for cardiology books but this one is fast-paced and.highly interesting. It is a testament to the dedication of pioneering doctors/cardiologists without whose value of innovation and life, I, personally, and countless others would not be here today. Prof Stephen Westaby wri...

    While I work in the medical field, this was a hard book to get into. It had a lot of information, and was very wordy. I enjoyed the book, but for the non-medical person, it may be "a lot". I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads but it has no bearing on the rating ...

    This is a good read for anyone who has a fascination with hearts, whether you're a medical student, a patient with heart issues, or a parent of someone with heart issues. I was personally drawn to this book because my youngest daughter was born with complex congenital heart defects, an...

    Heart rending, heart wrenching, heart tugging. What?s more DrWestaby saves his greatest venom for socialized medicine. Lamenting how costs and bureaucracy have taken the light out of surgery and seriously imperiled the number of cardiac surgeons in England. ...

    Would give more than 5star if I could, this is my kind of book! This book lines up perfectly with some of my other favorite medical memoir (Dr Marsh, Kalanthi, and some others). Loved the deeply personal stories, some with good outcomes, and some with bad. The author has been doubly bl...

    So moving. Its a non-fiction book which tells its stories like a thriller. Its so good that after reading a library copy, I just had to order a hard copy online to be re-read in the future. I will probably still need the tissue box. ...

    You are taken on a roller coaster journey of a pioneering and very talented heart surgeon. After giving a brief account of why and how Westaby became a surgeon each chapter tells a story of some very gutsy decisions and radical techniques. We never know till the end of the chapter whet...

    Its not a kind of book I would normally read, but surprisingly I enjoyed it very much. Its well written and very educating. The stories are experience based which make it more intriguing to read. 5 stars for this book! ...

  • Linda
    Jun 17, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

    Stephen's book very accurately represents him - iconoclastic, innovative, brilliant, revolutionary, single-minded, determined, inspirational - but also egotistical, sometimes arrogant, difficult and prone to alienate colleagues. I was CEO in Oxford when the first Jarvik 2000 was put in...

    I'm a sucker for cardiology books but this one is fast-paced and.highly interesting. It is a testament to the dedication of pioneering doctors/cardiologists without whose value of innovation and life, I, personally, and countless others would not be here today. Prof Stephen Westaby wri...

    While I work in the medical field, this was a hard book to get into. It had a lot of information, and was very wordy. I enjoyed the book, but for the non-medical person, it may be "a lot". I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads but it has no bearing on the rating ...

    This is a good read for anyone who has a fascination with hearts, whether you're a medical student, a patient with heart issues, or a parent of someone with heart issues. I was personally drawn to this book because my youngest daughter was born with complex congenital heart defects, an...

    Heart rending, heart wrenching, heart tugging. What?s more DrWestaby saves his greatest venom for socialized medicine. Lamenting how costs and bureaucracy have taken the light out of surgery and seriously imperiled the number of cardiac surgeons in England. ...

    Would give more than 5star if I could, this is my kind of book! This book lines up perfectly with some of my other favorite medical memoir (Dr Marsh, Kalanthi, and some others). Loved the deeply personal stories, some with good outcomes, and some with bad. The author has been doubly bl...

    So moving. Its a non-fiction book which tells its stories like a thriller. Its so good that after reading a library copy, I just had to order a hard copy online to be re-read in the future. I will probably still need the tissue box. ...

    You are taken on a roller coaster journey of a pioneering and very talented heart surgeon. After giving a brief account of why and how Westaby became a surgeon each chapter tells a story of some very gutsy decisions and radical techniques. We never know till the end of the chapter whet...

  • Laura
    Jan 06, 2018

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

  • Emma Townshend
    Sep 12, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

  • Chantal Lyons
    Feb 07, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

  • Mandi Bross
    Aug 11, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

  • Susie Garner
    May 28, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

    Stephen's book very accurately represents him - iconoclastic, innovative, brilliant, revolutionary, single-minded, determined, inspirational - but also egotistical, sometimes arrogant, difficult and prone to alienate colleagues. I was CEO in Oxford when the first Jarvik 2000 was put in...

    I'm a sucker for cardiology books but this one is fast-paced and.highly interesting. It is a testament to the dedication of pioneering doctors/cardiologists without whose value of innovation and life, I, personally, and countless others would not be here today. Prof Stephen Westaby wri...

    While I work in the medical field, this was a hard book to get into. It had a lot of information, and was very wordy. I enjoyed the book, but for the non-medical person, it may be "a lot". I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads but it has no bearing on the rating ...

    This is a good read for anyone who has a fascination with hearts, whether you're a medical student, a patient with heart issues, or a parent of someone with heart issues. I was personally drawn to this book because my youngest daughter was born with complex congenital heart defects, an...

    Heart rending, heart wrenching, heart tugging. What?s more DrWestaby saves his greatest venom for socialized medicine. Lamenting how costs and bureaucracy have taken the light out of surgery and seriously imperiled the number of cardiac surgeons in England. ...

    Would give more than 5star if I could, this is my kind of book! This book lines up perfectly with some of my other favorite medical memoir (Dr Marsh, Kalanthi, and some others). Loved the deeply personal stories, some with good outcomes, and some with bad. The author has been doubly bl...

    So moving. Its a non-fiction book which tells its stories like a thriller. Its so good that after reading a library copy, I just had to order a hard copy online to be re-read in the future. I will probably still need the tissue box. ...

    You are taken on a roller coaster journey of a pioneering and very talented heart surgeon. After giving a brief account of why and how Westaby became a surgeon each chapter tells a story of some very gutsy decisions and radical techniques. We never know till the end of the chapter whet...

    Its not a kind of book I would normally read, but surprisingly I enjoyed it very much. Its well written and very educating. The stories are experience based which make it more intriguing to read. 5 stars for this book! ...

    Won this in a Goodreads giveaway, and I'm so glad I did! A fascinating, sad and sometimes painful insight into the life and work of a heart surgeon. Triumph and tragedy go hand in hand and it was sometimes excruciating to read about how the heroic efforts of the surgeon and his team ca...

    A true insight into the hardships and miracles of cardiac surgery! The perfect balance, in my opinion, of scientific/medical jargon and explanative english. As an a-level student I didn't feel at all overwhelmed while reading this as it has been written in such a way as to cater for va...

  • Kayo
    Jun 03, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

    Stephen's book very accurately represents him - iconoclastic, innovative, brilliant, revolutionary, single-minded, determined, inspirational - but also egotistical, sometimes arrogant, difficult and prone to alienate colleagues. I was CEO in Oxford when the first Jarvik 2000 was put in...

    I'm a sucker for cardiology books but this one is fast-paced and.highly interesting. It is a testament to the dedication of pioneering doctors/cardiologists without whose value of innovation and life, I, personally, and countless others would not be here today. Prof Stephen Westaby wri...

    While I work in the medical field, this was a hard book to get into. It had a lot of information, and was very wordy. I enjoyed the book, but for the non-medical person, it may be "a lot". I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads but it has no bearing on the rating ...

  • Anne
    Dec 31, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

    Stephen's book very accurately represents him - iconoclastic, innovative, brilliant, revolutionary, single-minded, determined, inspirational - but also egotistical, sometimes arrogant, difficult and prone to alienate colleagues. I was CEO in Oxford when the first Jarvik 2000 was put in...

    I'm a sucker for cardiology books but this one is fast-paced and.highly interesting. It is a testament to the dedication of pioneering doctors/cardiologists without whose value of innovation and life, I, personally, and countless others would not be here today. Prof Stephen Westaby wri...

  • David Highton
    Feb 01, 2018

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

    Stephen's book very accurately represents him - iconoclastic, innovative, brilliant, revolutionary, single-minded, determined, inspirational - but also egotistical, sometimes arrogant, difficult and prone to alienate colleagues. I was CEO in Oxford when the first Jarvik 2000 was put in...

  • Stephanie Lim
    Jun 22, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

    Stephen's book very accurately represents him - iconoclastic, innovative, brilliant, revolutionary, single-minded, determined, inspirational - but also egotistical, sometimes arrogant, difficult and prone to alienate colleagues. I was CEO in Oxford when the first Jarvik 2000 was put in...

    I'm a sucker for cardiology books but this one is fast-paced and.highly interesting. It is a testament to the dedication of pioneering doctors/cardiologists without whose value of innovation and life, I, personally, and countless others would not be here today. Prof Stephen Westaby wri...

    While I work in the medical field, this was a hard book to get into. It had a lot of information, and was very wordy. I enjoyed the book, but for the non-medical person, it may be "a lot". I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads but it has no bearing on the rating ...

    This is a good read for anyone who has a fascination with hearts, whether you're a medical student, a patient with heart issues, or a parent of someone with heart issues. I was personally drawn to this book because my youngest daughter was born with complex congenital heart defects, an...

    Heart rending, heart wrenching, heart tugging. What?s more DrWestaby saves his greatest venom for socialized medicine. Lamenting how costs and bureaucracy have taken the light out of surgery and seriously imperiled the number of cardiac surgeons in England. ...

    Would give more than 5star if I could, this is my kind of book! This book lines up perfectly with some of my other favorite medical memoir (Dr Marsh, Kalanthi, and some others). Loved the deeply personal stories, some with good outcomes, and some with bad. The author has been doubly bl...

    So moving. Its a non-fiction book which tells its stories like a thriller. Its so good that after reading a library copy, I just had to order a hard copy online to be re-read in the future. I will probably still need the tissue box. ...

  • Jennifer Peavy
    Jun 18, 2017

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...

    I really enjoyed this book because the stories are JUST BREATHTAKING. My stars removed are because the writing is fairly technical and oftentimes I found myself thinking that if I didn't already know what the coronary artery was etc I would be really confused. He is not quite the natur...

    Professor Stephen Westaby is a prominent UK cardiac surgeon. In this book he tells us about his own life and family and how the death of his grandparents led him to deciding to become a doctor. He has lots of fascinating stories about his training years. Most of the book though is d...

    Stephen's book very accurately represents him - iconoclastic, innovative, brilliant, revolutionary, single-minded, determined, inspirational - but also egotistical, sometimes arrogant, difficult and prone to alienate colleagues. I was CEO in Oxford when the first Jarvik 2000 was put in...

    I'm a sucker for cardiology books but this one is fast-paced and.highly interesting. It is a testament to the dedication of pioneering doctors/cardiologists without whose value of innovation and life, I, personally, and countless others would not be here today. Prof Stephen Westaby wri...

    While I work in the medical field, this was a hard book to get into. It had a lot of information, and was very wordy. I enjoyed the book, but for the non-medical person, it may be "a lot". I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads but it has no bearing on the rating ...

    This is a good read for anyone who has a fascination with hearts, whether you're a medical student, a patient with heart issues, or a parent of someone with heart issues. I was personally drawn to this book because my youngest daughter was born with complex congenital heart defects, an...

  • Mme LionHead
    Feb 14, 2018

    This is one of those books of medical true-life stories, but is more technical than most By the end, I knew a great deal more of the structure of the heart, blood chemistry and why making lots of pee is extremely important. The author is a very forthright sort of man, and a very em...

    ?We stop life and start it again, making things better, taking calculated risks.? Although the 2017 Wellcome Prize shortlist has only just been announced, this is my early favorite for the 2018 prize (for fiction and nonfiction on a medical theme). What Henry Marsh did for brain su...

    A brilliant, thought provoking memoir chronicling renowned heart surgeon Westaby as he details his life and career. Starting from humble beginnings, the author challenges the perception that only public schoolboys get to be surgeons. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the hosp...

    One of those cases where I was in a funk and just going through OverDrive app, trying to find something different to listen to, that would lift me out of the fog and de-stress me. This one stood out to me, the fact Westaby was from the UK peaked my interest too. I hadn't listened to...

    Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives. Fragile Lives is a memoir wr...

    ?A successful cardiac surgeon is a man who, when asked to identify the three best surgeons in the world, has difficulty in naming the other two.? Fragile Lives, by Professor Stephen Westaby, is a memoir that is both awe inspiring and heart-rending. It tells the story of the medi...

    This book...ugh. I really wanted to like it and honesty thought I would. I loved When Breath Becomes Air and thought this might be similar. Not so much. The author is a retired heart surgeon in the UK, so a lot of the commentary about their healthcare system (NHS) felt disconnected to ...

    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com I really, really enjoyed this memoir - I fancied something that would make a change from all the fiction I usually read, and this turned out to be the perfect pick. It's full of fascinating stories, both from Professor Stephen Westaby...

    As a child Westaby watched two of his grandparents die slow painful deaths; his grandfather from heart failure and his grandmother from a cancer which left her to suffocate. This experience has clearly directed his career and his desires to help those who would otherwise be written off...

    Like many UK readers, I read Henry Marsh's remarkable "Do No Harm". That book is a wondrous eye-opener; "Fragile Lives" is a gut-wrenching adrenaline rush, written by another member of the retired-eminent-surgeon club, Stephen Westaby. The writing is no-nonsense yet vivid, sparing w...

    Westaby is a pioneering heart surgeon who retired recently after 50 years at the operating table. Here he recounts some of his more interesting cases. There were some fascinating stories and Westaby comes across as a surgeon with heart (pun totally intended). I would recommend this to ...

    Powerfully moving, probably because the subject matter is one of life and death. Lost count of the number of times I was gripped by strong feelings. Repetitive at times (how many times do you want to hear about the author sawing through the sternum with the electrocautery, piercing th...

    Way. Too many. Distracting. Sentence fragments. Not a natural writer. Some interesting anecdotes. Lots of whinging about the British health care system, which had limited relevance to this American reader. ...

    Open Heart reads like a fast-paced action adventure movie. Westaby takes us on a brief biographical journey as to how he became interested in heart surgery, his training and then torpedoes straight into different life or death situations which require delicate procedures, his abilities...

    This book is a bit like Grey's Anatomy with each chapter and case study emotionally gripping and heart wrenching (pun not intended). Westaby is humble in his arrogance and self-effacing in his success. He knows exactly what he is all about and how to get the story out without getting l...

    Westaby is an insufferable person. Yet, his arrogance, disregard for hospital politics, and pompous nature makes him an excellent advocate for terminally ill patients who are denied treatment options due to risks involved or simply lack of imagination. I admire many of his bold decisio...