We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights

We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights

We the Corporations chronicles the astonishing story of one of the most successful yet least well-known ?civil rights movements? in American history. Hardly oppressed like women and minorities, business corporations, too, have fought since the nation?s earliest days to gain equal rights under the Constitution?and today have nearly all the same rights as ordinary people. Exp We the Corporations chronicles the astonishing story of one of the most successful yet least well-known ?ci...

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Title:We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights
Author:Adam Winkler
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0871407124
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:496 pages pages

We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights Reviews

  • Joshua
    Mar 14, 2019

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    "Lawyers and historians have extensively studied the civil rights movements for racial minorities, women, and the others, making those stories central to our understanding of the Constitution and of America itself. Corporations too, have had a civil rights movement of sorts. Although C...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    Adam Winkler does a superlative job of illustrating the centuries old civil rights movement for Big Business. Whether Liberal or Conservative the nation?s highest court has always been pro business. This book is just filled with fascinating information on how the courts work to how t...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This book delivers the lesson I assume all of its readers were looking to get: that corporations have cleverly used the courts to expand their own legal rights and undermine business regulation. It is set up as the backstory to the Citizens United case, which the author frames, convinc...

  • Elizabeth
    Feb 26, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    "Lawyers and historians have extensively studied the civil rights movements for racial minorities, women, and the others, making those stories central to our understanding of the Constitution and of America itself. Corporations too, have had a civil rights movement of sorts. Although C...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

  • Mehrsa
    Mar 12, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

  • Andy
    Dec 03, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

  • John Gustafson
    Nov 12, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

  • Rob
    Apr 18, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

  • Graeme Roberts
    Jul 18, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

  • Rahul  Adusumilli
    Apr 27, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

  • Yousef M
    Dec 13, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

  • Ms.pegasus
    Feb 20, 2019

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

  • Connor Stack
    Jul 26, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    "Lawyers and historians have extensively studied the civil rights movements for racial minorities, women, and the others, making those stories central to our understanding of the Constitution and of America itself. Corporations too, have had a civil rights movement of sorts. Although C...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

  • Heather
    Mar 01, 2019

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    "Lawyers and historians have extensively studied the civil rights movements for racial minorities, women, and the others, making those stories central to our understanding of the Constitution and of America itself. Corporations too, have had a civil rights movement of sorts. Although C...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    Adam Winkler does a superlative job of illustrating the centuries old civil rights movement for Big Business. Whether Liberal or Conservative the nation?s highest court has always been pro business. This book is just filled with fascinating information on how the courts work to how t...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This book delivers the lesson I assume all of its readers were looking to get: that corporations have cleverly used the courts to expand their own legal rights and undermine business regulation. It is set up as the backstory to the Citizens United case, which the author frames, convinc...

    This is mainly a judicial history of the concept of corporations in America, going back to the original formation of Jamestown by the Virginia Company. One of Winkler's theses is that corporations throughout American history have been working to be seen as individual people, with the s...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    One of the best nonfiction history books I?ve read in a long time. This book focuses on how corporate America has fought for rights just like the citizens using the American constitution and Bill Of Rights. The reason why this was possible is the use of ?persons? rather than ?c...

  • Emma Sea
    Mar 17, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

  • Maynard Handley
    May 15, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

  • Sher
    Aug 11, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

  • Humza Hussain
    Mar 08, 2019

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    "Lawyers and historians have extensively studied the civil rights movements for racial minorities, women, and the others, making those stories central to our understanding of the Constitution and of America itself. Corporations too, have had a civil rights movement of sorts. Although C...

  • David Buccola
    Nov 23, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    "Lawyers and historians have extensively studied the civil rights movements for racial minorities, women, and the others, making those stories central to our understanding of the Constitution and of America itself. Corporations too, have had a civil rights movement of sorts. Although C...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    Adam Winkler does a superlative job of illustrating the centuries old civil rights movement for Big Business. Whether Liberal or Conservative the nation?s highest court has always been pro business. This book is just filled with fascinating information on how the courts work to how t...

  • Maggie Holmes
    Dec 12, 2017

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

  • Robert Gustavo
    Jul 01, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

  • Melissa
    Sep 08, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

  • John_g
    Jun 27, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    "Lawyers and historians have extensively studied the civil rights movements for racial minorities, women, and the others, making those stories central to our understanding of the Constitution and of America itself. Corporations too, have had a civil rights movement of sorts. Although C...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    Adam Winkler does a superlative job of illustrating the centuries old civil rights movement for Big Business. Whether Liberal or Conservative the nation?s highest court has always been pro business. This book is just filled with fascinating information on how the courts work to how t...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This book delivers the lesson I assume all of its readers were looking to get: that corporations have cleverly used the courts to expand their own legal rights and undermine business regulation. It is set up as the backstory to the Citizens United case, which the author frames, convinc...

    This is mainly a judicial history of the concept of corporations in America, going back to the original formation of Jamestown by the Virginia Company. One of Winkler's theses is that corporations throughout American history have been working to be seen as individual people, with the s...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

  • Chrystal
    Dec 28, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

  • David Wineberg
    Jan 20, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

  • Will A
    Mar 19, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    "Lawyers and historians have extensively studied the civil rights movements for racial minorities, women, and the others, making those stories central to our understanding of the Constitution and of America itself. Corporations too, have had a civil rights movement of sorts. Although C...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    Adam Winkler does a superlative job of illustrating the centuries old civil rights movement for Big Business. Whether Liberal or Conservative the nation?s highest court has always been pro business. This book is just filled with fascinating information on how the courts work to how t...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

  • Robert Stevenson
    Jun 20, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    "Lawyers and historians have extensively studied the civil rights movements for racial minorities, women, and the others, making those stories central to our understanding of the Constitution and of America itself. Corporations too, have had a civil rights movement of sorts. Although C...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

  • Conor
    Oct 13, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

  • Chris Shores
    Feb 28, 2019

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    "Lawyers and historians have extensively studied the civil rights movements for racial minorities, women, and the others, making those stories central to our understanding of the Constitution and of America itself. Corporations too, have had a civil rights movement of sorts. Although C...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    Adam Winkler does a superlative job of illustrating the centuries old civil rights movement for Big Business. Whether Liberal or Conservative the nation?s highest court has always been pro business. This book is just filled with fascinating information on how the courts work to how t...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This book delivers the lesson I assume all of its readers were looking to get: that corporations have cleverly used the courts to expand their own legal rights and undermine business regulation. It is set up as the backstory to the Citizens United case, which the author frames, convinc...

    This is mainly a judicial history of the concept of corporations in America, going back to the original formation of Jamestown by the Virginia Company. One of Winkler's theses is that corporations throughout American history have been working to be seen as individual people, with the s...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    One of the best nonfiction history books I?ve read in a long time. This book focuses on how corporate America has fought for rights just like the citizens using the American constitution and Bill Of Rights. The reason why this was possible is the use of ?persons? rather than ?c...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

    This was a fascinating nonfiction book about the history of Supreme Court cases involving corporate rights. A series of cases over the past 200 years laid the groundwork for the controversial Citizens United ruling involving corporate financing of elections. I didn't know much abou...

  • David Dayen
    Jun 10, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    "Lawyers and historians have extensively studied the civil rights movements for racial minorities, women, and the others, making those stories central to our understanding of the Constitution and of America itself. Corporations too, have had a civil rights movement of sorts. Although C...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    Adam Winkler does a superlative job of illustrating the centuries old civil rights movement for Big Business. Whether Liberal or Conservative the nation?s highest court has always been pro business. This book is just filled with fascinating information on how the courts work to how t...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This book delivers the lesson I assume all of its readers were looking to get: that corporations have cleverly used the courts to expand their own legal rights and undermine business regulation. It is set up as the backstory to the Citizens United case, which the author frames, convinc...

    This is mainly a judicial history of the concept of corporations in America, going back to the original formation of Jamestown by the Virginia Company. One of Winkler's theses is that corporations throughout American history have been working to be seen as individual people, with the s...

    This important and timely book, published 2/2018, reveals Corporate America's ability to persuade the Supreme Court that corporations qualify for more and more constitutional rights. The author corrects the misunderstanding that SCOTUS thinks corporations are people. To the contrary "r...

    One of the best nonfiction history books I?ve read in a long time. This book focuses on how corporate America has fought for rights just like the citizens using the American constitution and Bill Of Rights. The reason why this was possible is the use of ?persons? rather than ?c...

    The crescendo of this book is the Citizens United ruling, which to the uninitiated emerged seemingly out of nowhere, from a determined court that re-litigated a case already decided to expand the constitutional rights given to corporations to meddle in our democracy. Adam Winkler shows...

  • Jeremy
    Dec 14, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...

    Topic: The author's thesis is that the pursuit of greater economic and political rights by U.S. corporations over the last 400 years is closely intertwined with how many cherished individual civil rights and liberties, particularly for women and religious and political minorities, w...

    This is a treasure trove of fascinating facts about the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. The book could have been a good deal shorter without losing anything. Also, I feel that there was not enough attention paid to the concept of revoking corporate charters, i.e. if corporations a...

    This is one of the books I always wanted to write (along with Anne Bogel's Reading People book.) I've known that the history of corporation rights began early in our country's history. I just didn't know how early. We the Corporations is an important book about an important topic. Co...

    I had next to zero prior understanding of any of the legal cases or terminology described in the book, and honestly very little background on any Supreme Court justice (other than watching the RBG documentary). This was a fascinating, well-woven, dense, but understandable overview of t...

    A terrific and fastidious history of corporate ?civil rights? in America. Among the most valuable dimensions of this book is a careful consideration of what corporate ?personhood? has classically meant, and how the idea has gotten sloppy and widely misunderstood by Americans, s...

    A very worthwhile read, but not an easy one. America has struggled with the personhood of corporations for more than two hundred years, and yet the recent Citizens United and Hobby Lobby decisions are, according to bipartisan agreement, among the worst ever made. I was fascinated but s...

    A must-read for anyone concerned about the erosion of citizens? rights. Never would I have thought that learning the history of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on corporate rights would be so absorbing and fascinating! ...

    A fascinating, and highly accessible story of the development of rights for corporations. In spite of the overwhelming public opposition to the SCOTUS decision in "Citizens United" that opened the floodgates for money in politics, Winkler demonstrates that that decision sits on a scaff...

    wait, there's no Kindle edition?? ...

    "Lawyers and historians have extensively studied the civil rights movements for racial minorities, women, and the others, making those stories central to our understanding of the Constitution and of America itself. Corporations too, have had a civil rights movement of sorts. Although C...

    We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights (Hardcover) by Adam Winkler from the library heard au on 1A ( https://the1a.org/) on NPR Feb 26 2018 also On the Media Apr 16 2018 https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/how... listen 4:20 to end--- esp on the 14t...

    Very detailed history of corporate rights in America, from the East India Company all the way to Citizens United. It's too detailed for me, I got about half way then skipped to the concluding chapter. I would say read this is you're looking for a lot of depth, but a more accessible boo...

    I became interested in this book for two reasons: The first reason was spurred by a review I read in ?The Nation? by David Cole on ?Artificial Persons? that discussed the ?Citizen United? Supreme Court decision and recommended Adam Winkler?s book. The second reason ...

    Adam Winkler does a superlative job of illustrating the centuries old civil rights movement for Big Business. Whether Liberal or Conservative the nation?s highest court has always been pro business. This book is just filled with fascinating information on how the courts work to how t...

    The cry of "Corporations are not people!" after 'Citizens United' was not quite right. The US Supreme Court has tended to restrict corporate rights when it has treated corporations as persons, artificial legal persons; and to grant them rights when it has treated them as bearers of the...

    This book delivers the lesson I assume all of its readers were looking to get: that corporations have cleverly used the courts to expand their own legal rights and undermine business regulation. It is set up as the backstory to the Citizens United case, which the author frames, convinc...

    This is mainly a judicial history of the concept of corporations in America, going back to the original formation of Jamestown by the Virginia Company. One of Winkler's theses is that corporations throughout American history have been working to be seen as individual people, with the s...

  • Marks54
    Apr 09, 2018

    In 1916 Henry Ford doubled his workers' wages and declined to raise dividends, declaring stockholders were earning enough. Regardless of his true motives, when the Dodge Brothers sued him for neglecting his fiduciary obligation to maximize profits, the supreme court of Michigan agreed ...

    If you're interested in understanding how we got to the point where corporations have more say in our democracy than The People, look no further. Adam Winkler, a professor of law at UCLA, has written a corker. I might be biased as a history nerd/major and a lawyer, but I found this...

    I expected an uninteresting rant about the plutocracy in America --- valid but nothing we haven't heard a thousand times before. But this book is a lot more interesting than that. It's a legal history describing the cases and arguments that led to the way American law conceptualizes ...

    It's hard to write a 400 year history, but this was very well done and admirably focused. At times I wished for more analysis and less of a play by play, but the story that emerges is pretty clear. What I found fascinating is the early American history--We, the people of America, were ...

    It is endlessly entertaining to examine Supreme Court decisions, to follow the logic and often the prejudice and corruption they comprise. We The Corporations selectively follows the tribulations of the 14th amendment, designed specifically to prevent discrimination among the newly fre...

    The content is excellent and informative, but the writing is a little dry and repetitive. It presents the history of corporate law, and the expansion of corporate rights from the founding of the colonies up to Citizens United and Hobby Lobby ? including how the courts swing between t...

    I knew law could be arbitrary but I didn't know law could be fun. The author likes to repeat, a good 100 pages could easily have been shaved off. The historical research is on fleek, to borrow a phrase from the kids. ...

    One of my top 2018 reads. _We the Corporations _ traces the history of corporate rights in America, and clearly shows what led up to the landmark decision Citizens United. Apparently, based on research cited in this book- there is nonpartisan disapproval across the board regarding Citi...

    This is a book by a law professor at UCLA detailing the history of how US corporate bodies came to increasingly be viewed as legal persons with a widening array of property and liberty rights comparable to those we normally consider as being possessed by individual human beings. The st...