The Rules Do Not Apply: A Memoir

The Rules Do Not Apply: A Memoir

When thirty-eight-year-old New Yorker writer Ariel Levy left for a reporting trip to Mongolia in 2012, she was pregnant, married, financially secure, and successful on her own terms. A month later, none of that was true. Levy picks you up and hurls you through the story of how she built an unconventional life and then watched it fall apart with astonishing speed. Like much When thirty-eight-year-old New Yorker writer Ariel Levy left for a reporting trip to Mongolia in 2012, she was pregna...

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Title:The Rules Do Not Apply: A Memoir
Author:Ariel Levy
Rating:
Genres:Autobiography
ISBN:The Rules Do Not Apply
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:207 pages pages

The Rules Do Not Apply: A Memoir Reviews

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    Mar 31, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

  • Rachel Smalter Hall
    Mar 31, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

    I made small talk on the cold front deck of the restaurant with a curly-haired woman, and she told me about her daughters and how exhausted she was all the time, and then something turned in her head and her face looked like it wasn't sure what to do with itself. She said, "Are you the...

    2.5 stars Ariel Levy can write, and write extremely well. In fact, the book?s main strength is her writing so eloquently about grief (no spoiler: she lost a baby at 19 week?s gestation while traveling in Mongolia for work). My heart broke for her as she talks of holding her tiny s...

    I LOVED listening to this book, and devoured it in just a few sittings. It's a very raw, personal, and confessional memoir by a woman who wears her considerable flaws on her sleeve ? in other words, it's exactly my cup of tea. The author does her own performance on the audiobook, add...

  • JanB
    Jul 12, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

    I made small talk on the cold front deck of the restaurant with a curly-haired woman, and she told me about her daughters and how exhausted she was all the time, and then something turned in her head and her face looked like it wasn't sure what to do with itself. She said, "Are you the...

    2.5 stars Ariel Levy can write, and write extremely well. In fact, the book?s main strength is her writing so eloquently about grief (no spoiler: she lost a baby at 19 week?s gestation while traveling in Mongolia for work). My heart broke for her as she talks of holding her tiny s...

  • Diane
    May 20, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

  • Rachel
    Jun 14, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

    I made small talk on the cold front deck of the restaurant with a curly-haired woman, and she told me about her daughters and how exhausted she was all the time, and then something turned in her head and her face looked like it wasn't sure what to do with itself. She said, "Are you the...

    2.5 stars Ariel Levy can write, and write extremely well. In fact, the book?s main strength is her writing so eloquently about grief (no spoiler: she lost a baby at 19 week?s gestation while traveling in Mongolia for work). My heart broke for her as she talks of holding her tiny s...

    I LOVED listening to this book, and devoured it in just a few sittings. It's a very raw, personal, and confessional memoir by a woman who wears her considerable flaws on her sleeve ? in other words, it's exactly my cup of tea. The author does her own performance on the audiobook, add...

    "All of my conjuring had led to only ruin and death. Now I was a wounded witch, wailing in the forest, undone." The writing is good, though sometimes too melodramatic for me (see above). At times it seemed disingenuous and lacked real emotion. For me to connect with a memoirist,...

    This book is hard to rate, because I enjoyed it but I didn't like it, if that even makes any sense. It is a memoir about a particularly difficult time in the author's life, in which she has a truly horrific miscarriage, endures the collapse of her marriage, and suffers some economic in...

    Tough book to review, a memoir is. The writing, or the person's life? Ariel Levy's writing is bold, raw and purposely in your face, which is good for magazines and books to grab you by the throat. A memoir, most, should grab you by the heart for better or worse., but Levy's also grabs ...

    I found "Rules Do Not Apply" moving and relatable. She does a good job of deleaneating the spectrum of sexuality, in fact probably the best I've read anywhere. She describes her feelings about people without regard, or very little, for whether they're male or female. She chooses romant...

    Back in the day, I was a fan of Levy?s first book, Female Chauvinist Pigs, about women and the rise of raunch culture. So I was thrilled to get my hands on an advance copy of her memoir, about a woman who wants it all?lifelong companionship, fantastic sex, a child of her own, and a...

    Levy's writing is a pleasure to read. She shares some very difficult things with a gracefully unapologetic candor that sucked me right in. I had some problems with it, but overall it was a lovely read. ...

  • britt_brooke
    Aug 18, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

    I made small talk on the cold front deck of the restaurant with a curly-haired woman, and she told me about her daughters and how exhausted she was all the time, and then something turned in her head and her face looked like it wasn't sure what to do with itself. She said, "Are you the...

    2.5 stars Ariel Levy can write, and write extremely well. In fact, the book?s main strength is her writing so eloquently about grief (no spoiler: she lost a baby at 19 week?s gestation while traveling in Mongolia for work). My heart broke for her as she talks of holding her tiny s...

    I LOVED listening to this book, and devoured it in just a few sittings. It's a very raw, personal, and confessional memoir by a woman who wears her considerable flaws on her sleeve ? in other words, it's exactly my cup of tea. The author does her own performance on the audiobook, add...

    "All of my conjuring had led to only ruin and death. Now I was a wounded witch, wailing in the forest, undone." The writing is good, though sometimes too melodramatic for me (see above). At times it seemed disingenuous and lacked real emotion. For me to connect with a memoirist,...

  • Roxane
    Apr 18, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

  • Eve
    Apr 14, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

  • Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance
    Apr 08, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

  • Cynthia
    Mar 14, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

    I made small talk on the cold front deck of the restaurant with a curly-haired woman, and she told me about her daughters and how exhausted she was all the time, and then something turned in her head and her face looked like it wasn't sure what to do with itself. She said, "Are you the...

    2.5 stars Ariel Levy can write, and write extremely well. In fact, the book?s main strength is her writing so eloquently about grief (no spoiler: she lost a baby at 19 week?s gestation while traveling in Mongolia for work). My heart broke for her as she talks of holding her tiny s...

    I LOVED listening to this book, and devoured it in just a few sittings. It's a very raw, personal, and confessional memoir by a woman who wears her considerable flaws on her sleeve ? in other words, it's exactly my cup of tea. The author does her own performance on the audiobook, add...

    "All of my conjuring had led to only ruin and death. Now I was a wounded witch, wailing in the forest, undone." The writing is good, though sometimes too melodramatic for me (see above). At times it seemed disingenuous and lacked real emotion. For me to connect with a memoirist,...

    This book is hard to rate, because I enjoyed it but I didn't like it, if that even makes any sense. It is a memoir about a particularly difficult time in the author's life, in which she has a truly horrific miscarriage, endures the collapse of her marriage, and suffers some economic in...

    Tough book to review, a memoir is. The writing, or the person's life? Ariel Levy's writing is bold, raw and purposely in your face, which is good for magazines and books to grab you by the throat. A memoir, most, should grab you by the heart for better or worse., but Levy's also grabs ...

    I found "Rules Do Not Apply" moving and relatable. She does a good job of deleaneating the spectrum of sexuality, in fact probably the best I've read anywhere. She describes her feelings about people without regard, or very little, for whether they're male or female. She chooses romant...

  • Trish
    Apr 08, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

  • Joy Clark
    Dec 24, 2016

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

  • Julie Ehlers
    Nov 17, 2016

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

  • Dianne
    Jul 30, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

  • Esil
    Mar 27, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

  • Holly
    May 28, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

    I made small talk on the cold front deck of the restaurant with a curly-haired woman, and she told me about her daughters and how exhausted she was all the time, and then something turned in her head and her face looked like it wasn't sure what to do with itself. She said, "Are you the...

    2.5 stars Ariel Levy can write, and write extremely well. In fact, the book?s main strength is her writing so eloquently about grief (no spoiler: she lost a baby at 19 week?s gestation while traveling in Mongolia for work). My heart broke for her as she talks of holding her tiny s...

    I LOVED listening to this book, and devoured it in just a few sittings. It's a very raw, personal, and confessional memoir by a woman who wears her considerable flaws on her sleeve ? in other words, it's exactly my cup of tea. The author does her own performance on the audiobook, add...

    "All of my conjuring had led to only ruin and death. Now I was a wounded witch, wailing in the forest, undone." The writing is good, though sometimes too melodramatic for me (see above). At times it seemed disingenuous and lacked real emotion. For me to connect with a memoirist,...

    This book is hard to rate, because I enjoyed it but I didn't like it, if that even makes any sense. It is a memoir about a particularly difficult time in the author's life, in which she has a truly horrific miscarriage, endures the collapse of her marriage, and suffers some economic in...

    Tough book to review, a memoir is. The writing, or the person's life? Ariel Levy's writing is bold, raw and purposely in your face, which is good for magazines and books to grab you by the throat. A memoir, most, should grab you by the heart for better or worse., but Levy's also grabs ...

    I found "Rules Do Not Apply" moving and relatable. She does a good job of deleaneating the spectrum of sexuality, in fact probably the best I've read anywhere. She describes her feelings about people without regard, or very little, for whether they're male or female. She chooses romant...

    Back in the day, I was a fan of Levy?s first book, Female Chauvinist Pigs, about women and the rise of raunch culture. So I was thrilled to get my hands on an advance copy of her memoir, about a woman who wants it all?lifelong companionship, fantastic sex, a child of her own, and a...

    Levy's writing is a pleasure to read. She shares some very difficult things with a gracefully unapologetic candor that sucked me right in. I had some problems with it, but overall it was a lovely read. ...

    This book isn't quite what I was expecting. (I'm not sure the marketing for this memoir did it any favors.) That said, I ended up enjoying this book more than I thought I would. Levy is a wonderful writer and her story is heartbreaking. A beautiful read. ...

    Levy veers between the banal and the somewhat insightful. And - dare I say it - the emotional cliffhangers at the end of nearly every short chapter seemed kind of cheap. Although I didn't like this book as I thought I might, I respect that Levy is pretty hard on herself here, not flatt...

  • Bonnie Brody
    Feb 02, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

  • Debbie
    Jun 14, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

  • Lynn
    Apr 05, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

    I made small talk on the cold front deck of the restaurant with a curly-haired woman, and she told me about her daughters and how exhausted she was all the time, and then something turned in her head and her face looked like it wasn't sure what to do with itself. She said, "Are you the...

    2.5 stars Ariel Levy can write, and write extremely well. In fact, the book?s main strength is her writing so eloquently about grief (no spoiler: she lost a baby at 19 week?s gestation while traveling in Mongolia for work). My heart broke for her as she talks of holding her tiny s...

    I LOVED listening to this book, and devoured it in just a few sittings. It's a very raw, personal, and confessional memoir by a woman who wears her considerable flaws on her sleeve ? in other words, it's exactly my cup of tea. The author does her own performance on the audiobook, add...

    "All of my conjuring had led to only ruin and death. Now I was a wounded witch, wailing in the forest, undone." The writing is good, though sometimes too melodramatic for me (see above). At times it seemed disingenuous and lacked real emotion. For me to connect with a memoirist,...

    This book is hard to rate, because I enjoyed it but I didn't like it, if that even makes any sense. It is a memoir about a particularly difficult time in the author's life, in which she has a truly horrific miscarriage, endures the collapse of her marriage, and suffers some economic in...

    Tough book to review, a memoir is. The writing, or the person's life? Ariel Levy's writing is bold, raw and purposely in your face, which is good for magazines and books to grab you by the throat. A memoir, most, should grab you by the heart for better or worse., but Levy's also grabs ...

    I found "Rules Do Not Apply" moving and relatable. She does a good job of deleaneating the spectrum of sexuality, in fact probably the best I've read anywhere. She describes her feelings about people without regard, or very little, for whether they're male or female. She chooses romant...

    Back in the day, I was a fan of Levy?s first book, Female Chauvinist Pigs, about women and the rise of raunch culture. So I was thrilled to get my hands on an advance copy of her memoir, about a woman who wants it all?lifelong companionship, fantastic sex, a child of her own, and a...

    Levy's writing is a pleasure to read. She shares some very difficult things with a gracefully unapologetic candor that sucked me right in. I had some problems with it, but overall it was a lovely read. ...

    This book isn't quite what I was expecting. (I'm not sure the marketing for this memoir did it any favors.) That said, I ended up enjoying this book more than I thought I would. Levy is a wonderful writer and her story is heartbreaking. A beautiful read. ...

    Levy veers between the banal and the somewhat insightful. And - dare I say it - the emotional cliffhangers at the end of nearly every short chapter seemed kind of cheap. Although I didn't like this book as I thought I might, I respect that Levy is pretty hard on herself here, not flatt...

    Ariel Levy is a journalist who writes for The New Yorker. She chronicles her early life, her career, her travels, and her tragedies in a whip-smart and in-your-face manner. She is dealt a mighty blow which crushes her only to come back stronger. What I liked about the book is that I di...

  • Enchantress  debbicat ☮
    May 28, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

    I made small talk on the cold front deck of the restaurant with a curly-haired woman, and she told me about her daughters and how exhausted she was all the time, and then something turned in her head and her face looked like it wasn't sure what to do with itself. She said, "Are you the...

  • Melissa Stacy
    Mar 29, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

  • Rachel León
    Apr 09, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

    I made small talk on the cold front deck of the restaurant with a curly-haired woman, and she told me about her daughters and how exhausted she was all the time, and then something turned in her head and her face looked like it wasn't sure what to do with itself. She said, "Are you the...

    2.5 stars Ariel Levy can write, and write extremely well. In fact, the book?s main strength is her writing so eloquently about grief (no spoiler: she lost a baby at 19 week?s gestation while traveling in Mongolia for work). My heart broke for her as she talks of holding her tiny s...

    I LOVED listening to this book, and devoured it in just a few sittings. It's a very raw, personal, and confessional memoir by a woman who wears her considerable flaws on her sleeve ? in other words, it's exactly my cup of tea. The author does her own performance on the audiobook, add...

    "All of my conjuring had led to only ruin and death. Now I was a wounded witch, wailing in the forest, undone." The writing is good, though sometimes too melodramatic for me (see above). At times it seemed disingenuous and lacked real emotion. For me to connect with a memoirist,...

    This book is hard to rate, because I enjoyed it but I didn't like it, if that even makes any sense. It is a memoir about a particularly difficult time in the author's life, in which she has a truly horrific miscarriage, endures the collapse of her marriage, and suffers some economic in...

    Tough book to review, a memoir is. The writing, or the person's life? Ariel Levy's writing is bold, raw and purposely in your face, which is good for magazines and books to grab you by the throat. A memoir, most, should grab you by the heart for better or worse., but Levy's also grabs ...

    I found "Rules Do Not Apply" moving and relatable. She does a good job of deleaneating the spectrum of sexuality, in fact probably the best I've read anywhere. She describes her feelings about people without regard, or very little, for whether they're male or female. She chooses romant...

    Back in the day, I was a fan of Levy?s first book, Female Chauvinist Pigs, about women and the rise of raunch culture. So I was thrilled to get my hands on an advance copy of her memoir, about a woman who wants it all?lifelong companionship, fantastic sex, a child of her own, and a...

    Levy's writing is a pleasure to read. She shares some very difficult things with a gracefully unapologetic candor that sucked me right in. I had some problems with it, but overall it was a lovely read. ...

    This book isn't quite what I was expecting. (I'm not sure the marketing for this memoir did it any favors.) That said, I ended up enjoying this book more than I thought I would. Levy is a wonderful writer and her story is heartbreaking. A beautiful read. ...

  • Emily Crow
    Apr 14, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

    I made small talk on the cold front deck of the restaurant with a curly-haired woman, and she told me about her daughters and how exhausted she was all the time, and then something turned in her head and her face looked like it wasn't sure what to do with itself. She said, "Are you the...

    2.5 stars Ariel Levy can write, and write extremely well. In fact, the book?s main strength is her writing so eloquently about grief (no spoiler: she lost a baby at 19 week?s gestation while traveling in Mongolia for work). My heart broke for her as she talks of holding her tiny s...

    I LOVED listening to this book, and devoured it in just a few sittings. It's a very raw, personal, and confessional memoir by a woman who wears her considerable flaws on her sleeve ? in other words, it's exactly my cup of tea. The author does her own performance on the audiobook, add...

    "All of my conjuring had led to only ruin and death. Now I was a wounded witch, wailing in the forest, undone." The writing is good, though sometimes too melodramatic for me (see above). At times it seemed disingenuous and lacked real emotion. For me to connect with a memoirist,...

    This book is hard to rate, because I enjoyed it but I didn't like it, if that even makes any sense. It is a memoir about a particularly difficult time in the author's life, in which she has a truly horrific miscarriage, endures the collapse of her marriage, and suffers some economic in...

  • Toni
    May 21, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

    I made small talk on the cold front deck of the restaurant with a curly-haired woman, and she told me about her daughters and how exhausted she was all the time, and then something turned in her head and her face looked like it wasn't sure what to do with itself. She said, "Are you the...

    2.5 stars Ariel Levy can write, and write extremely well. In fact, the book?s main strength is her writing so eloquently about grief (no spoiler: she lost a baby at 19 week?s gestation while traveling in Mongolia for work). My heart broke for her as she talks of holding her tiny s...

    I LOVED listening to this book, and devoured it in just a few sittings. It's a very raw, personal, and confessional memoir by a woman who wears her considerable flaws on her sleeve ? in other words, it's exactly my cup of tea. The author does her own performance on the audiobook, add...

    "All of my conjuring had led to only ruin and death. Now I was a wounded witch, wailing in the forest, undone." The writing is good, though sometimes too melodramatic for me (see above). At times it seemed disingenuous and lacked real emotion. For me to connect with a memoirist,...

    This book is hard to rate, because I enjoyed it but I didn't like it, if that even makes any sense. It is a memoir about a particularly difficult time in the author's life, in which she has a truly horrific miscarriage, endures the collapse of her marriage, and suffers some economic in...

    Tough book to review, a memoir is. The writing, or the person's life? Ariel Levy's writing is bold, raw and purposely in your face, which is good for magazines and books to grab you by the throat. A memoir, most, should grab you by the heart for better or worse., but Levy's also grabs ...

  • Ashley Lacy
    Feb 13, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

  • Julia Shaw
    Mar 09, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

  • Book Riot Community
    Mar 29, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

    It's billed as a memoir, but The Rules Do Not Apply feels more like an exploration of grief, an attempt to make sense of tragedy and loss. And it reads beautifully. Levy doesn't pull any punches - she hits you right in the gut, baring her wounds in such raw fashion that the reader fe...

    WARNING: Highly Opinionated Review to Follow In my sixty years, I've learned a little about people. Not a lot, mind you, but a little. I can now separate people into two categories: Drama Queens (male and female, against all stereotypes) and Those Who Prefer Peace and Quiet. I'm afr...

    Ariel Levy is a woman who grew up knowing she could have everything. She believed in the kindness of Mother Nature, the voice of reason (if it came from her), the importance of her own worth, and the ability to make her own rules. She traversed the world seeking adventure and writing a...

    I made small talk on the cold front deck of the restaurant with a curly-haired woman, and she told me about her daughters and how exhausted she was all the time, and then something turned in her head and her face looked like it wasn't sure what to do with itself. She said, "Are you the...

    2.5 stars Ariel Levy can write, and write extremely well. In fact, the book?s main strength is her writing so eloquently about grief (no spoiler: she lost a baby at 19 week?s gestation while traveling in Mongolia for work). My heart broke for her as she talks of holding her tiny s...

    I LOVED listening to this book, and devoured it in just a few sittings. It's a very raw, personal, and confessional memoir by a woman who wears her considerable flaws on her sleeve ? in other words, it's exactly my cup of tea. The author does her own performance on the audiobook, add...

    "All of my conjuring had led to only ruin and death. Now I was a wounded witch, wailing in the forest, undone." The writing is good, though sometimes too melodramatic for me (see above). At times it seemed disingenuous and lacked real emotion. For me to connect with a memoirist,...

    This book is hard to rate, because I enjoyed it but I didn't like it, if that even makes any sense. It is a memoir about a particularly difficult time in the author's life, in which she has a truly horrific miscarriage, endures the collapse of her marriage, and suffers some economic in...

    Tough book to review, a memoir is. The writing, or the person's life? Ariel Levy's writing is bold, raw and purposely in your face, which is good for magazines and books to grab you by the throat. A memoir, most, should grab you by the heart for better or worse., but Levy's also grabs ...

    I found "Rules Do Not Apply" moving and relatable. She does a good job of deleaneating the spectrum of sexuality, in fact probably the best I've read anywhere. She describes her feelings about people without regard, or very little, for whether they're male or female. She chooses romant...

    Back in the day, I was a fan of Levy?s first book, Female Chauvinist Pigs, about women and the rise of raunch culture. So I was thrilled to get my hands on an advance copy of her memoir, about a woman who wants it all?lifelong companionship, fantastic sex, a child of her own, and a...

  • Brandice
    Jun 11, 2017

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

    The literary memoir "The Rules Do Not Apply" is all about a privileged white woman who has led a charmed life. The author has been raised to assume she has control over all aspects of her life because nothing traumatic has ever happened to her, or anyone in her family, and she has had ...

    It's tough to rate a grief memoir without feeling like you're making a personal comment about the author or her experiences, so I feel a need to qualify my choice of three stars... I'm very impressed with the author's writing skills and empathize with the grief she felt over her miscar...

    I rarely sit down with a book only to look up hours later and realize I've consumed it in its entirety. Such was the case with The Rules Do Not Apply! It was recommended on a Podcast, and I knew nothing else going into it besides the fact that it was a memoir. Though achingly depr...

    I had read such mixed reviews of this one that I almost didn't read it, but I'm glad I did. Where other people saw an unlikable writer, I only saw honesty, about relationships, deciding what kind of life you are going to have, etc. I sat and read it cover to cover. One example: "I...

    One hell of a memoir - visceral and beautifully written. I disliked her intensely for most of the book but that matters not a whit. I admire her unflinching candor. This is one I won't soon forget. ...

    I'm in Ariel Levy's camp for life. While I thought Female Chauvinist Pigs didn't quite live up to its potential, I appreciated its thesis and Levy's engaging writing, and reading her New Yorker essays in subsequent years cemented my admiration. When I learned that The Rules Do Not Appl...

    2.5* I won this book in a giveaway and was really pumped to read it. Memoirs are hard to rate, I don't want to come off as judging the author personally. Ariel is good at writing without a doubt, but her storytelling was all over the place to me, especially at the beginning. What ha...

    2.5 stars - I did not know who Ariel Levy was prior to hearing about her book, The Rules Do Not Apply. After finishing it, I have mixed feelings. I feel there was quite a bit of hype for the book, and while parts of it were good, I don't know If I'm as into it as many other readers see...

  • Hannah
    Jan 04, 2018

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...

    Who is this Ariel Levy, anyway? It?s always a risk to read a memoir by someone you?ve never heard of, or who isn?t a blogger with lots of creds. I?ve been burnt before. But this is definitely a keeper. Levy, at 38, had it all, and was dazed with happiness as she looked forward ...

    I didn?t know anything about Ariel Levy ? who is a writer with The New Yorker -- but the description of her memoir sounded interesting. Well, it turns out that I would probably be happy to read anything by Levy and I need to look for some of her other writings. Her memoir deals wit...

    This memoir got a lot of hype, some of which is justified. Ariel Levy has some strong passages in the book, but parts of it felt padded and unfocused. The Rules Do Not Apply is an extension of an article Levy wrote in The New Yorker on a horrible miscarriage she suffered while repor...

    Ariel Levy always believed she could be a writer. Her mother told her it was a good idea, a normal thing for a pre-teen to aspire to, something for a teen to aim for. She was in her late teens when she wrote for New York magazine about a bar in Queens where enormously heavy women dance...

    To talk about this book, I have to also talk about memoirs and my relationship with them in general. This book challenged me and my ideas of memoirs, especially those written by women. I have talked about my enjoyment of memoirs elsewhere so it is safe to say that it is a type of book ...

  • Pouting Always
    Jan 16, 2018

    Hmm. The writing on a sentence level is exquisite. Levy's vocabulary is just superb. This is an interesting book. Levy demonstrates self awareness and is willing to put herself on the page in uncomfortable but compelling ways. The end of the book is a mess. The last few chapters are ju...

    I'm just going to talk openly about what happens in the memoir because it seems as though it's mostly all out there as is, and so I don't want people yelling at me about spoilers. The literal summary provided makes even the miscarriage clear. Ariel Levy was thirty eight when she got pr...