Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment

Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment

From one of America?s greatest minds, a journey through psychology, philosophy, and lots of meditation to show how Buddhism holds the key to moral clarity and enduring happiness. Robert Wright famously explained in The Moral Animal how evolution shaped the human brain. The mind is designed to often delude us, he argued, about ourselves and about the world. And it is designe From one of America?s greatest minds, a journey through psychology, philosophy, and lots of meditation to show ho...

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Title:Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment
Author:Robert Wright
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Audiobook
Number of Pages:336 pages pages

Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment Reviews

  • Socraticgadfly
    Sep 25, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

    I was a huge fan of Wright's EVOLUTION OF GOD where he tracked the progress in humanity's idea of God from an evolutionary paradigm. That is why I was surprised by his new book: In what sense did he mean Buddhism is "true"? Well, he is still a naturalist but he has discovered that Budd...

    It took me a while to put my finger on why I found this book irritating, but I think I've figured it out. I LOVE self help books based on scientific and psychological research, ones that cite a lot of studies and academic papers. I HATE self help books based on the personal opinions an...

    Cool, the interaction of philosophy of mind, buddhist theology, and recent neuroscience. I can see a number of consistencies between leftist ideas of how the mind works and buddhist conceptions, such as non-self and emptiness doctrines, the notion that desire is separate from the desir...

    This book is essentially an introduction to secular Buddhism. The emphasis on the utilizing Buddhist ideas and practice to recognize the distortions in our perception of reality both inwardly and outwardly. The book covers several core Buddhist ideas, however, it doesn't actually spend...

    Interview with the author on Fresh Air: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-sh... ...

    A bit of an extended throat-clearing before I explain rating a book by an author who I hold in very high esteem with a measly 2 stars: 1) I absolutely was enthralled with Robert Wright's, "The Moral Animal," and I think any animal wishing to understand morality should read it. 2) I a...

    Wrong from the title on Ignore the blurbs, it?s still a bad book There are several reasons for that. First, IMO, Wright is overrated. I rated ?The Evolution of God? as a one-star. This one had a chance to get lucky, even though it was starting minus 1 star due to the tit...

  • Sarah
    Aug 09, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

    I was a huge fan of Wright's EVOLUTION OF GOD where he tracked the progress in humanity's idea of God from an evolutionary paradigm. That is why I was surprised by his new book: In what sense did he mean Buddhism is "true"? Well, he is still a naturalist but he has discovered that Budd...

    It took me a while to put my finger on why I found this book irritating, but I think I've figured it out. I LOVE self help books based on scientific and psychological research, ones that cite a lot of studies and academic papers. I HATE self help books based on the personal opinions an...

    Cool, the interaction of philosophy of mind, buddhist theology, and recent neuroscience. I can see a number of consistencies between leftist ideas of how the mind works and buddhist conceptions, such as non-self and emptiness doctrines, the notion that desire is separate from the desir...

    This book is essentially an introduction to secular Buddhism. The emphasis on the utilizing Buddhist ideas and practice to recognize the distortions in our perception of reality both inwardly and outwardly. The book covers several core Buddhist ideas, however, it doesn't actually spend...

    Interview with the author on Fresh Air: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-sh... ...

  • Ken
    Oct 09, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

  • Mehrsa
    Aug 11, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

  • Michael Austin
    Jan 26, 2019

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

  • Billie Pritchett
    Aug 30, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

    I was a huge fan of Wright's EVOLUTION OF GOD where he tracked the progress in humanity's idea of God from an evolutionary paradigm. That is why I was surprised by his new book: In what sense did he mean Buddhism is "true"? Well, he is still a naturalist but he has discovered that Budd...

    It took me a while to put my finger on why I found this book irritating, but I think I've figured it out. I LOVE self help books based on scientific and psychological research, ones that cite a lot of studies and academic papers. I HATE self help books based on the personal opinions an...

    Cool, the interaction of philosophy of mind, buddhist theology, and recent neuroscience. I can see a number of consistencies between leftist ideas of how the mind works and buddhist conceptions, such as non-self and emptiness doctrines, the notion that desire is separate from the desir...

    This book is essentially an introduction to secular Buddhism. The emphasis on the utilizing Buddhist ideas and practice to recognize the distortions in our perception of reality both inwardly and outwardly. The book covers several core Buddhist ideas, however, it doesn't actually spend...

    Interview with the author on Fresh Air: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-sh... ...

    A bit of an extended throat-clearing before I explain rating a book by an author who I hold in very high esteem with a measly 2 stars: 1) I absolutely was enthralled with Robert Wright's, "The Moral Animal," and I think any animal wishing to understand morality should read it. 2) I a...

    Wrong from the title on Ignore the blurbs, it?s still a bad book There are several reasons for that. First, IMO, Wright is overrated. I rated ?The Evolution of God? as a one-star. This one had a chance to get lucky, even though it was starting minus 1 star due to the tit...

    A good friend of mine suggested this book for a book circle, which was awesome, as it made me read it a bit more thoroughly than I would have otherwise. Given the topic, showing that modern psychology corroborates buddhism and its theories, it is a very good idea to be paying attention...

    Very insightful and raises very good discussion questions. As expected with a book of this kind, you have to go in w/ an open mind. More important TL;DRs: Feelings are very central and important to humans. They?ve been put in place by evolution to get us to where we are today. H...

    This is Robert Wright?s attempt to square the insights and outcomes of Buddhist practices and philosophy with evolutionary psychology. The book is confused and confusing at times. But that?s mostly because Buddhism is pretty confused and confusing when you press down hard on so...

    I started out skeptical, but once I realized what Wright was doing here I became very interested, sometimes fascinated. He's well-known as a sort of irascible atheistic moralist (The Moral Animal, The Evolution of God, etc.) and so maybe not someone I'd have expected to dive into mindf...

    I listened to Robert Wright's Why Buddhism Is True in audiobook format. I'm glad I did. It's a good work. What Wright does in the book is argue for the major tenants and practices of Buddhism insofar as they help us with the tendencies we've been endowed with through natural selection....

  • Richard
    Aug 28, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

  • Shilpi Gowda
    Nov 18, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

  • Shaina Robbins
    Oct 16, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

    I was a huge fan of Wright's EVOLUTION OF GOD where he tracked the progress in humanity's idea of God from an evolutionary paradigm. That is why I was surprised by his new book: In what sense did he mean Buddhism is "true"? Well, he is still a naturalist but he has discovered that Budd...

    It took me a while to put my finger on why I found this book irritating, but I think I've figured it out. I LOVE self help books based on scientific and psychological research, ones that cite a lot of studies and academic papers. I HATE self help books based on the personal opinions an...

  • MGMaudlin
    Aug 26, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

    I was a huge fan of Wright's EVOLUTION OF GOD where he tracked the progress in humanity's idea of God from an evolutionary paradigm. That is why I was surprised by his new book: In what sense did he mean Buddhism is "true"? Well, he is still a naturalist but he has discovered that Budd...

  • Morgan Blackledge
    Jun 01, 2018

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

    I was a huge fan of Wright's EVOLUTION OF GOD where he tracked the progress in humanity's idea of God from an evolutionary paradigm. That is why I was surprised by his new book: In what sense did he mean Buddhism is "true"? Well, he is still a naturalist but he has discovered that Budd...

    It took me a while to put my finger on why I found this book irritating, but I think I've figured it out. I LOVE self help books based on scientific and psychological research, ones that cite a lot of studies and academic papers. I HATE self help books based on the personal opinions an...

    Cool, the interaction of philosophy of mind, buddhist theology, and recent neuroscience. I can see a number of consistencies between leftist ideas of how the mind works and buddhist conceptions, such as non-self and emptiness doctrines, the notion that desire is separate from the desir...

    This book is essentially an introduction to secular Buddhism. The emphasis on the utilizing Buddhist ideas and practice to recognize the distortions in our perception of reality both inwardly and outwardly. The book covers several core Buddhist ideas, however, it doesn't actually spend...

    Interview with the author on Fresh Air: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-sh... ...

    A bit of an extended throat-clearing before I explain rating a book by an author who I hold in very high esteem with a measly 2 stars: 1) I absolutely was enthralled with Robert Wright's, "The Moral Animal," and I think any animal wishing to understand morality should read it. 2) I a...

    Wrong from the title on Ignore the blurbs, it?s still a bad book There are several reasons for that. First, IMO, Wright is overrated. I rated ?The Evolution of God? as a one-star. This one had a chance to get lucky, even though it was starting minus 1 star due to the tit...

    A good friend of mine suggested this book for a book circle, which was awesome, as it made me read it a bit more thoroughly than I would have otherwise. Given the topic, showing that modern psychology corroborates buddhism and its theories, it is a very good idea to be paying attention...

    Very insightful and raises very good discussion questions. As expected with a book of this kind, you have to go in w/ an open mind. More important TL;DRs: Feelings are very central and important to humans. They?ve been put in place by evolution to get us to where we are today. H...

    This is Robert Wright?s attempt to square the insights and outcomes of Buddhist practices and philosophy with evolutionary psychology. The book is confused and confusing at times. But that?s mostly because Buddhism is pretty confused and confusing when you press down hard on so...

  • Holly
    Jan 29, 2018

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

    I was a huge fan of Wright's EVOLUTION OF GOD where he tracked the progress in humanity's idea of God from an evolutionary paradigm. That is why I was surprised by his new book: In what sense did he mean Buddhism is "true"? Well, he is still a naturalist but he has discovered that Budd...

    It took me a while to put my finger on why I found this book irritating, but I think I've figured it out. I LOVE self help books based on scientific and psychological research, ones that cite a lot of studies and academic papers. I HATE self help books based on the personal opinions an...

    Cool, the interaction of philosophy of mind, buddhist theology, and recent neuroscience. I can see a number of consistencies between leftist ideas of how the mind works and buddhist conceptions, such as non-self and emptiness doctrines, the notion that desire is separate from the desir...

    This book is essentially an introduction to secular Buddhism. The emphasis on the utilizing Buddhist ideas and practice to recognize the distortions in our perception of reality both inwardly and outwardly. The book covers several core Buddhist ideas, however, it doesn't actually spend...

    Interview with the author on Fresh Air: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-sh... ...

    A bit of an extended throat-clearing before I explain rating a book by an author who I hold in very high esteem with a measly 2 stars: 1) I absolutely was enthralled with Robert Wright's, "The Moral Animal," and I think any animal wishing to understand morality should read it. 2) I a...

    Wrong from the title on Ignore the blurbs, it?s still a bad book There are several reasons for that. First, IMO, Wright is overrated. I rated ?The Evolution of God? as a one-star. This one had a chance to get lucky, even though it was starting minus 1 star due to the tit...

    A good friend of mine suggested this book for a book circle, which was awesome, as it made me read it a bit more thoroughly than I would have otherwise. Given the topic, showing that modern psychology corroborates buddhism and its theories, it is a very good idea to be paying attention...

    Very insightful and raises very good discussion questions. As expected with a book of this kind, you have to go in w/ an open mind. More important TL;DRs: Feelings are very central and important to humans. They?ve been put in place by evolution to get us to where we are today. H...

    This is Robert Wright?s attempt to square the insights and outcomes of Buddhist practices and philosophy with evolutionary psychology. The book is confused and confusing at times. But that?s mostly because Buddhism is pretty confused and confusing when you press down hard on so...

    I started out skeptical, but once I realized what Wright was doing here I became very interested, sometimes fascinated. He's well-known as a sort of irascible atheistic moralist (The Moral Animal, The Evolution of God, etc.) and so maybe not someone I'd have expected to dive into mindf...

  • sologdin
    May 31, 2019

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

    I was a huge fan of Wright's EVOLUTION OF GOD where he tracked the progress in humanity's idea of God from an evolutionary paradigm. That is why I was surprised by his new book: In what sense did he mean Buddhism is "true"? Well, he is still a naturalist but he has discovered that Budd...

    It took me a while to put my finger on why I found this book irritating, but I think I've figured it out. I LOVE self help books based on scientific and psychological research, ones that cite a lot of studies and academic papers. I HATE self help books based on the personal opinions an...

    Cool, the interaction of philosophy of mind, buddhist theology, and recent neuroscience. I can see a number of consistencies between leftist ideas of how the mind works and buddhist conceptions, such as non-self and emptiness doctrines, the notion that desire is separate from the desir...

  • Gabrielle
    Jun 26, 2019

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

  • Dan Graser
    Sep 12, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

    I was a huge fan of Wright's EVOLUTION OF GOD where he tracked the progress in humanity's idea of God from an evolutionary paradigm. That is why I was surprised by his new book: In what sense did he mean Buddhism is "true"? Well, he is still a naturalist but he has discovered that Budd...

    It took me a while to put my finger on why I found this book irritating, but I think I've figured it out. I LOVE self help books based on scientific and psychological research, ones that cite a lot of studies and academic papers. I HATE self help books based on the personal opinions an...

    Cool, the interaction of philosophy of mind, buddhist theology, and recent neuroscience. I can see a number of consistencies between leftist ideas of how the mind works and buddhist conceptions, such as non-self and emptiness doctrines, the notion that desire is separate from the desir...

    This book is essentially an introduction to secular Buddhism. The emphasis on the utilizing Buddhist ideas and practice to recognize the distortions in our perception of reality both inwardly and outwardly. The book covers several core Buddhist ideas, however, it doesn't actually spend...

    Interview with the author on Fresh Air: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-sh... ...

    A bit of an extended throat-clearing before I explain rating a book by an author who I hold in very high esteem with a measly 2 stars: 1) I absolutely was enthralled with Robert Wright's, "The Moral Animal," and I think any animal wishing to understand morality should read it. 2) I a...

  • Tadeas Petak
    Sep 27, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

    I was a huge fan of Wright's EVOLUTION OF GOD where he tracked the progress in humanity's idea of God from an evolutionary paradigm. That is why I was surprised by his new book: In what sense did he mean Buddhism is "true"? Well, he is still a naturalist but he has discovered that Budd...

    It took me a while to put my finger on why I found this book irritating, but I think I've figured it out. I LOVE self help books based on scientific and psychological research, ones that cite a lot of studies and academic papers. I HATE self help books based on the personal opinions an...

    Cool, the interaction of philosophy of mind, buddhist theology, and recent neuroscience. I can see a number of consistencies between leftist ideas of how the mind works and buddhist conceptions, such as non-self and emptiness doctrines, the notion that desire is separate from the desir...

    This book is essentially an introduction to secular Buddhism. The emphasis on the utilizing Buddhist ideas and practice to recognize the distortions in our perception of reality both inwardly and outwardly. The book covers several core Buddhist ideas, however, it doesn't actually spend...

    Interview with the author on Fresh Air: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-sh... ...

    A bit of an extended throat-clearing before I explain rating a book by an author who I hold in very high esteem with a measly 2 stars: 1) I absolutely was enthralled with Robert Wright's, "The Moral Animal," and I think any animal wishing to understand morality should read it. 2) I a...

    Wrong from the title on Ignore the blurbs, it?s still a bad book There are several reasons for that. First, IMO, Wright is overrated. I rated ?The Evolution of God? as a one-star. This one had a chance to get lucky, even though it was starting minus 1 star due to the tit...

    A good friend of mine suggested this book for a book circle, which was awesome, as it made me read it a bit more thoroughly than I would have otherwise. Given the topic, showing that modern psychology corroborates buddhism and its theories, it is a very good idea to be paying attention...

  • Ross Blocher
    Oct 11, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

  • Toto
    Aug 26, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

  • Domenic Molinaro
    Aug 18, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

  • Murtaza
    Oct 31, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

  • Jake
    Feb 14, 2018

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

  • Roy Lotz
    Jan 23, 2018

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

  • Brian Bergstrom
    Aug 07, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

  • Darwin8u
    Aug 13, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

  • Radiantflux
    Sep 29, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

  • Vinit Nayak
    Mar 17, 2018

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

    I was a huge fan of Wright's EVOLUTION OF GOD where he tracked the progress in humanity's idea of God from an evolutionary paradigm. That is why I was surprised by his new book: In what sense did he mean Buddhism is "true"? Well, he is still a naturalist but he has discovered that Budd...

    It took me a while to put my finger on why I found this book irritating, but I think I've figured it out. I LOVE self help books based on scientific and psychological research, ones that cite a lot of studies and academic papers. I HATE self help books based on the personal opinions an...

    Cool, the interaction of philosophy of mind, buddhist theology, and recent neuroscience. I can see a number of consistencies between leftist ideas of how the mind works and buddhist conceptions, such as non-self and emptiness doctrines, the notion that desire is separate from the desir...

    This book is essentially an introduction to secular Buddhism. The emphasis on the utilizing Buddhist ideas and practice to recognize the distortions in our perception of reality both inwardly and outwardly. The book covers several core Buddhist ideas, however, it doesn't actually spend...

    Interview with the author on Fresh Air: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-sh... ...

    A bit of an extended throat-clearing before I explain rating a book by an author who I hold in very high esteem with a measly 2 stars: 1) I absolutely was enthralled with Robert Wright's, "The Moral Animal," and I think any animal wishing to understand morality should read it. 2) I a...

    Wrong from the title on Ignore the blurbs, it?s still a bad book There are several reasons for that. First, IMO, Wright is overrated. I rated ?The Evolution of God? as a one-star. This one had a chance to get lucky, even though it was starting minus 1 star due to the tit...

    A good friend of mine suggested this book for a book circle, which was awesome, as it made me read it a bit more thoroughly than I would have otherwise. Given the topic, showing that modern psychology corroborates buddhism and its theories, it is a very good idea to be paying attention...

    Very insightful and raises very good discussion questions. As expected with a book of this kind, you have to go in w/ an open mind. More important TL;DRs: Feelings are very central and important to humans. They?ve been put in place by evolution to get us to where we are today. H...

  • Indran Fernando
    Oct 02, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

  • Carrie Poppy
    Aug 31, 2018

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

  • William2
    May 18, 2019

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

  • Tom Grover
    Sep 24, 2017

    A far more accurate title for this book would be Why Mindfulness Meditation is Good. For as Wright?who does not consider himself a Buddhist?admits, he is not really here to talk about any form of traditional Buddhism. He does not even present a strictly ?orthodox? view of any s...

    ?The problem with introspection is that it has no end.? ? Philip K. Dick For years I've told people I was a Zen Mormon. More as a way to squirm into the edges of LDS cosmology, and less because I was practicing anything really approaching a hybrid of Buddhism and Mormoni...

    I've read every book Wright's written and all have been fantastic. This is my favorite. It's the perfect book for the cultural moment we're in. Forget the title--it's misleading. The book is a nice primer on meditation and evolutionary theory with some helpful insights. Basically, our ...

    This is a truly remarkable, fantastic book. It is one of those rare volumes that will turn your head inside out and leave you seeing the world differently, not because he (or it) is extreme, but because reality is extreme; he is sewing together science and philosophy and offering reade...

    I disagree with the author?s view of meditation as a study of one?s thought. But then there are so many schools of meditation? I?m primarily interested in the evolutionary psychology angle here, but have to sit through these pages that don?t entirely accord with my Soto Zen d...

    Neither scientific, nor philosophical, nor in fact, enlightened, this book is the perfect example of facile thinking. You will say, I won't deal with the "supernatural" part of a religion, god, reincarnation and karma etc., but will riff only about what you like: mindfulness practi...

    The title is a bit misleading, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way. This book is really about Wright wanting you to know why he thinks secular Buddhism makes sense, and why mindfulness meditation is good for you. Wright goes with the basic idea that suffering is caused by our desires, and...

    Even if this book has its occasional thought-provoking moment, my overwhelming reaction is shock at how fluffy and slipshod the writing is. It seems as if Wright submitted a rough draft to make some quick cash. (Why waste time on an editor--just throw a goldfish on the cover and wait f...

    62nd book of 2017. I imagine the author at a diner party, demanding complete attention from those present, while he describes at length being at an intense macho meditation retreat in the Maine woods, having the unfortunate luck of sitting next to a fat flatulent person. Telling all...

    In book titles, the sub-title after the title is a popular but often unnecessary thing. In this case, it's necessary. Why Buddhism Is True is very much indeed about The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Especially the science. Or so it struck me, who at times ...

    Growing up I always had a problem reading philosophy books, which often seemed to be written in a way that made them deliberately obtuse and inaccessible. For that reason I was really glad when I discovered the writing of Will Durant, an early 20th century writer who became popular for...

    For the first time ever, as soon as I finished this book, I returned to the beginning and began it again. ...

    Here are a two things about myself that shaped my reading of Why Buddhism Is True First, I like to play at evolutionary theory. I am not a scientist, but I did write a book on evolutionary psychology (Useful Fictions: Evolution, Anxiety, and the Origins of Literature) as it applies ...

    I've been interested in many of Robert Wright's other books, but this is the first one I've read. The title is misleading (and perhaps nonsensical?), but there's plenty of interesting reflection here on the benefits of mindfulness meditation, both in terms of personal health and wellbe...

    I?d strongly recommend this for anyone curious about meditation, specifically the Buddhist Vipassan? ?mindfulness? meditation that everyone and their dog is doing, attempting, or at least talking about. What Robert Wright provides is the very welcome examination of the scient...

    Wright looks at Buddhism through the lens of modern psychology, but with a primary focus on his specialty: Evolutionary Psychology. The book served to be pretty enlightening , as it gave a solid overview of a secular, or "naturalistic " perspective of Buddhism - by showing how many psy...

    Life changing. ...

    I've given this 5 stars because it is the first book that I have come across that so neatly and persuasively links together the big ideas of buddhist thought and modern understanding of psychology and neuroscience. I've read great books that focus extensively on Buddhist logic with exa...

    I was a huge fan of Wright's EVOLUTION OF GOD where he tracked the progress in humanity's idea of God from an evolutionary paradigm. That is why I was surprised by his new book: In what sense did he mean Buddhism is "true"? Well, he is still a naturalist but he has discovered that Budd...

    It took me a while to put my finger on why I found this book irritating, but I think I've figured it out. I LOVE self help books based on scientific and psychological research, ones that cite a lot of studies and academic papers. I HATE self help books based on the personal opinions an...

    Cool, the interaction of philosophy of mind, buddhist theology, and recent neuroscience. I can see a number of consistencies between leftist ideas of how the mind works and buddhist conceptions, such as non-self and emptiness doctrines, the notion that desire is separate from the desir...

    This book is essentially an introduction to secular Buddhism. The emphasis on the utilizing Buddhist ideas and practice to recognize the distortions in our perception of reality both inwardly and outwardly. The book covers several core Buddhist ideas, however, it doesn't actually spend...