Jell-O Girls: A Family History

Jell-O Girls: A Family History

A memoir that braids the evolution of one of America's most iconic branding campaigns with the stirring tales of the women who lived behind its fašade - told by the inheritor of their stories. In 1899, Allie Rowbottom's great-great-great-uncle bought the patent to Jell-O from its inventor for $450. The sale would turn out to be one of the most profitable business deals in A A memoir that braids the evolution of one of America's most iconic branding campaigns with the stirring tales of the...

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Title:Jell-O Girls: A Family History
Author:Allie Rowbottom
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0316510610
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:288 pages pages

Jell-O Girls: A Family History Reviews

  • Cynthia
    Jun 28, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

  • Kalen
    Jul 19, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

    Ugh. I thought a book about Jello would be fun, but this is not fun at all. It's unrelenting misery and sickness, the cute cover is not accurate at all. Oh right, you can't judge a book by its cover. ...

    I have been on the waiting list to read this book for a while so I was very excited to take it with me to the beach. What a complete disappointment! This is such a load of self-indulgent bull$ht. Do not waste your time. ...

    I thought this would be a book about the history of Jell-O and there is a smattering of that, but it really is a memoir filled with way too much whining about life with the blame for bad decisions and misfortune placed on family money from some sort of Jell-O money "curse". I don't lik...

    I read this ARC and was just expecting a family history. It is so very much more. I was stunned reading about all the ways women are silenced. Not in a violent way but through history it has become so subtle and insidious. I've always felt I'm a strong woman but I even could see ways t...

    A fascinating, generational biography/memior of three heiresses and their individual interpretations of their family "curse." Rowbottom covers feminism, family drama, and the fate of sick girls in the hands of a patriarchal medical system. For fans of sweeping family stories, repressed...

    This is a DNF for me. I wanted to like the book but I struggled to stay engaged. The story wandered all over the place and I lost interest in trying to discern the central point. Thank you for the ARC. ...

    Jello-O Girls is a memoir by a descendant of the people who bought the Jell-O patent in 1899. From then until the present, though the family has been financially set and immensely privileged, Rowbottom posits that a "curse" beset the family and manifested itself in suicides, cancer, al...

    Over all, this book puzzled me. Looking back, the subtitle very clearly states that this is a family history, but from the description of the book it sounds much more like it is going to be a history of Jell-o and an unraveling of the causes/stories around the mysterious illnesses in t...

  • Jeanne
    Jul 04, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

    Ugh. I thought a book about Jello would be fun, but this is not fun at all. It's unrelenting misery and sickness, the cute cover is not accurate at all. Oh right, you can't judge a book by its cover. ...

    I have been on the waiting list to read this book for a while so I was very excited to take it with me to the beach. What a complete disappointment! This is such a load of self-indulgent bull$ht. Do not waste your time. ...

    I thought this would be a book about the history of Jell-O and there is a smattering of that, but it really is a memoir filled with way too much whining about life with the blame for bad decisions and misfortune placed on family money from some sort of Jell-O money "curse". I don't lik...

    I read this ARC and was just expecting a family history. It is so very much more. I was stunned reading about all the ways women are silenced. Not in a violent way but through history it has become so subtle and insidious. I've always felt I'm a strong woman but I even could see ways t...

  • Biblio Files (takingadayoff)
    May 14, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

  • Barbara
    Aug 14, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

    Ugh. I thought a book about Jello would be fun, but this is not fun at all. It's unrelenting misery and sickness, the cute cover is not accurate at all. Oh right, you can't judge a book by its cover. ...

    I have been on the waiting list to read this book for a while so I was very excited to take it with me to the beach. What a complete disappointment! This is such a load of self-indulgent bull$ht. Do not waste your time. ...

    I thought this would be a book about the history of Jell-O and there is a smattering of that, but it really is a memoir filled with way too much whining about life with the blame for bad decisions and misfortune placed on family money from some sort of Jell-O money "curse". I don't lik...

    I read this ARC and was just expecting a family history. It is so very much more. I was stunned reading about all the ways women are silenced. Not in a violent way but through history it has become so subtle and insidious. I've always felt I'm a strong woman but I even could see ways t...

    A fascinating, generational biography/memior of three heiresses and their individual interpretations of their family "curse." Rowbottom covers feminism, family drama, and the fate of sick girls in the hands of a patriarchal medical system. For fans of sweeping family stories, repressed...

    This is a DNF for me. I wanted to like the book but I struggled to stay engaged. The story wandered all over the place and I lost interest in trying to discern the central point. Thank you for the ARC. ...

    Jello-O Girls is a memoir by a descendant of the people who bought the Jell-O patent in 1899. From then until the present, though the family has been financially set and immensely privileged, Rowbottom posits that a "curse" beset the family and manifested itself in suicides, cancer, al...

    Over all, this book puzzled me. Looking back, the subtitle very clearly states that this is a family history, but from the description of the book it sounds much more like it is going to be a history of Jell-o and an unraveling of the causes/stories around the mysterious illnesses in t...

    I found the parts about the history of jell-o interesting, in terms of women's roles and feminism at that time. The rest of the book (most of it) about the author, her mother and grandmother were ok but overall too depressing. ...

    I thought maybe this would be about the women who developed Jell-O. Not at all. While it deals with family history, it is insightful, and revealing. It's a powerful story - but not the jiggly fun of gelatin in any flavor. ...

    If you?ve ever had a sick parent then skip the the last quarter of the book, major trigger. I enjoyed otherwise. ...

    Just now, I almost threw this book into the washing machine with my sheets. As we all know, too much water can ruin your Jell-o preparation. In this case, however, nothing could make it any worse. This book is as insipid as your worst Jell-o experience ever?or, maybe, more so. ...

  • Debby
    Jul 26, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

    Ugh. I thought a book about Jello would be fun, but this is not fun at all. It's unrelenting misery and sickness, the cute cover is not accurate at all. Oh right, you can't judge a book by its cover. ...

    I have been on the waiting list to read this book for a while so I was very excited to take it with me to the beach. What a complete disappointment! This is such a load of self-indulgent bull$ht. Do not waste your time. ...

    I thought this would be a book about the history of Jell-O and there is a smattering of that, but it really is a memoir filled with way too much whining about life with the blame for bad decisions and misfortune placed on family money from some sort of Jell-O money "curse". I don't lik...

    I read this ARC and was just expecting a family history. It is so very much more. I was stunned reading about all the ways women are silenced. Not in a violent way but through history it has become so subtle and insidious. I've always felt I'm a strong woman but I even could see ways t...

    A fascinating, generational biography/memior of three heiresses and their individual interpretations of their family "curse." Rowbottom covers feminism, family drama, and the fate of sick girls in the hands of a patriarchal medical system. For fans of sweeping family stories, repressed...

    This is a DNF for me. I wanted to like the book but I struggled to stay engaged. The story wandered all over the place and I lost interest in trying to discern the central point. Thank you for the ARC. ...

    Jello-O Girls is a memoir by a descendant of the people who bought the Jell-O patent in 1899. From then until the present, though the family has been financially set and immensely privileged, Rowbottom posits that a "curse" beset the family and manifested itself in suicides, cancer, al...

    Over all, this book puzzled me. Looking back, the subtitle very clearly states that this is a family history, but from the description of the book it sounds much more like it is going to be a history of Jell-o and an unraveling of the causes/stories around the mysterious illnesses in t...

    I found the parts about the history of jell-o interesting, in terms of women's roles and feminism at that time. The rest of the book (most of it) about the author, her mother and grandmother were ok but overall too depressing. ...

    I thought maybe this would be about the women who developed Jell-O. Not at all. While it deals with family history, it is insightful, and revealing. It's a powerful story - but not the jiggly fun of gelatin in any flavor. ...

  • Nancy
    Jun 30, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

  • Joanne  Clarke Gunter
    Aug 04, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

    Ugh. I thought a book about Jello would be fun, but this is not fun at all. It's unrelenting misery and sickness, the cute cover is not accurate at all. Oh right, you can't judge a book by its cover. ...

    I have been on the waiting list to read this book for a while so I was very excited to take it with me to the beach. What a complete disappointment! This is such a load of self-indulgent bull$ht. Do not waste your time. ...

    I thought this would be a book about the history of Jell-O and there is a smattering of that, but it really is a memoir filled with way too much whining about life with the blame for bad decisions and misfortune placed on family money from some sort of Jell-O money "curse". I don't lik...

  • Janday
    Jan 03, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

    Ugh. I thought a book about Jello would be fun, but this is not fun at all. It's unrelenting misery and sickness, the cute cover is not accurate at all. Oh right, you can't judge a book by its cover. ...

    I have been on the waiting list to read this book for a while so I was very excited to take it with me to the beach. What a complete disappointment! This is such a load of self-indulgent bull$ht. Do not waste your time. ...

    I thought this would be a book about the history of Jell-O and there is a smattering of that, but it really is a memoir filled with way too much whining about life with the blame for bad decisions and misfortune placed on family money from some sort of Jell-O money "curse". I don't lik...

    I read this ARC and was just expecting a family history. It is so very much more. I was stunned reading about all the ways women are silenced. Not in a violent way but through history it has become so subtle and insidious. I've always felt I'm a strong woman but I even could see ways t...

    A fascinating, generational biography/memior of three heiresses and their individual interpretations of their family "curse." Rowbottom covers feminism, family drama, and the fate of sick girls in the hands of a patriarchal medical system. For fans of sweeping family stories, repressed...

  • Jessica
    Aug 05, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

  • Leslie
    Jul 12, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

  • Becki
    Aug 06, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

  • Sherrie
    Jul 26, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

  • Cathie
    Jul 01, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

  • Elaine
    Aug 08, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

  • Tory
    May 29, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

  • Laura Herold
    Aug 13, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

    Ugh. I thought a book about Jello would be fun, but this is not fun at all. It's unrelenting misery and sickness, the cute cover is not accurate at all. Oh right, you can't judge a book by its cover. ...

    I have been on the waiting list to read this book for a while so I was very excited to take it with me to the beach. What a complete disappointment! This is such a load of self-indulgent bull$ht. Do not waste your time. ...

    I thought this would be a book about the history of Jell-O and there is a smattering of that, but it really is a memoir filled with way too much whining about life with the blame for bad decisions and misfortune placed on family money from some sort of Jell-O money "curse". I don't lik...

    I read this ARC and was just expecting a family history. It is so very much more. I was stunned reading about all the ways women are silenced. Not in a violent way but through history it has become so subtle and insidious. I've always felt I'm a strong woman but I even could see ways t...

    A fascinating, generational biography/memior of three heiresses and their individual interpretations of their family "curse." Rowbottom covers feminism, family drama, and the fate of sick girls in the hands of a patriarchal medical system. For fans of sweeping family stories, repressed...

    This is a DNF for me. I wanted to like the book but I struggled to stay engaged. The story wandered all over the place and I lost interest in trying to discern the central point. Thank you for the ARC. ...

    Jello-O Girls is a memoir by a descendant of the people who bought the Jell-O patent in 1899. From then until the present, though the family has been financially set and immensely privileged, Rowbottom posits that a "curse" beset the family and manifested itself in suicides, cancer, al...

    Over all, this book puzzled me. Looking back, the subtitle very clearly states that this is a family history, but from the description of the book it sounds much more like it is going to be a history of Jell-o and an unraveling of the causes/stories around the mysterious illnesses in t...

    I found the parts about the history of jell-o interesting, in terms of women's roles and feminism at that time. The rest of the book (most of it) about the author, her mother and grandmother were ok but overall too depressing. ...

    I thought maybe this would be about the women who developed Jell-O. Not at all. While it deals with family history, it is insightful, and revealing. It's a powerful story - but not the jiggly fun of gelatin in any flavor. ...

    If you?ve ever had a sick parent then skip the the last quarter of the book, major trigger. I enjoyed otherwise. ...

  • Karen Nelson
    Jun 10, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

  • Vara
    Aug 09, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

  • Erin Farmer
    Jul 27, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

  • Lynn
    Aug 17, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

    Ugh. I thought a book about Jello would be fun, but this is not fun at all. It's unrelenting misery and sickness, the cute cover is not accurate at all. Oh right, you can't judge a book by its cover. ...

    I have been on the waiting list to read this book for a while so I was very excited to take it with me to the beach. What a complete disappointment! This is such a load of self-indulgent bull$ht. Do not waste your time. ...

    I thought this would be a book about the history of Jell-O and there is a smattering of that, but it really is a memoir filled with way too much whining about life with the blame for bad decisions and misfortune placed on family money from some sort of Jell-O money "curse". I don't lik...

    I read this ARC and was just expecting a family history. It is so very much more. I was stunned reading about all the ways women are silenced. Not in a violent way but through history it has become so subtle and insidious. I've always felt I'm a strong woman but I even could see ways t...

    A fascinating, generational biography/memior of three heiresses and their individual interpretations of their family "curse." Rowbottom covers feminism, family drama, and the fate of sick girls in the hands of a patriarchal medical system. For fans of sweeping family stories, repressed...

    This is a DNF for me. I wanted to like the book but I struggled to stay engaged. The story wandered all over the place and I lost interest in trying to discern the central point. Thank you for the ARC. ...

    Jello-O Girls is a memoir by a descendant of the people who bought the Jell-O patent in 1899. From then until the present, though the family has been financially set and immensely privileged, Rowbottom posits that a "curse" beset the family and manifested itself in suicides, cancer, al...

    Over all, this book puzzled me. Looking back, the subtitle very clearly states that this is a family history, but from the description of the book it sounds much more like it is going to be a history of Jell-o and an unraveling of the causes/stories around the mysterious illnesses in t...

    I found the parts about the history of jell-o interesting, in terms of women's roles and feminism at that time. The rest of the book (most of it) about the author, her mother and grandmother were ok but overall too depressing. ...

  • Betsy Crawford
    Aug 06, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

    Ugh. I thought a book about Jello would be fun, but this is not fun at all. It's unrelenting misery and sickness, the cute cover is not accurate at all. Oh right, you can't judge a book by its cover. ...

    I have been on the waiting list to read this book for a while so I was very excited to take it with me to the beach. What a complete disappointment! This is such a load of self-indulgent bull$ht. Do not waste your time. ...

  • Debbie's Book Vlog
    Aug 12, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

  • Elisa
    Aug 07, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

    Ugh. I thought a book about Jello would be fun, but this is not fun at all. It's unrelenting misery and sickness, the cute cover is not accurate at all. Oh right, you can't judge a book by its cover. ...

  • Aja Gabel
    Jan 25, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

  • Jan P
    Aug 10, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

    Ugh. I thought a book about Jello would be fun, but this is not fun at all. It's unrelenting misery and sickness, the cute cover is not accurate at all. Oh right, you can't judge a book by its cover. ...

    I have been on the waiting list to read this book for a while so I was very excited to take it with me to the beach. What a complete disappointment! This is such a load of self-indulgent bull$ht. Do not waste your time. ...

    I thought this would be a book about the history of Jell-O and there is a smattering of that, but it really is a memoir filled with way too much whining about life with the blame for bad decisions and misfortune placed on family money from some sort of Jell-O money "curse". I don't lik...

    I read this ARC and was just expecting a family history. It is so very much more. I was stunned reading about all the ways women are silenced. Not in a violent way but through history it has become so subtle and insidious. I've always felt I'm a strong woman but I even could see ways t...

    A fascinating, generational biography/memior of three heiresses and their individual interpretations of their family "curse." Rowbottom covers feminism, family drama, and the fate of sick girls in the hands of a patriarchal medical system. For fans of sweeping family stories, repressed...

    This is a DNF for me. I wanted to like the book but I struggled to stay engaged. The story wandered all over the place and I lost interest in trying to discern the central point. Thank you for the ARC. ...

    Jello-O Girls is a memoir by a descendant of the people who bought the Jell-O patent in 1899. From then until the present, though the family has been financially set and immensely privileged, Rowbottom posits that a "curse" beset the family and manifested itself in suicides, cancer, al...

  • Mary Beth
    May 30, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

    The books was SO misleading. Yes she does write her family history and yes their family has ties to Jell-O's beginnings but it was SUCH a dreary, poor read. Was expecting more indepth history of Jell-O and how it tied to the family. She basically tries to tie every unhappy woman in her...

    Ugh. I thought a book about Jello would be fun, but this is not fun at all. It's unrelenting misery and sickness, the cute cover is not accurate at all. Oh right, you can't judge a book by its cover. ...

    I have been on the waiting list to read this book for a while so I was very excited to take it with me to the beach. What a complete disappointment! This is such a load of self-indulgent bull$ht. Do not waste your time. ...

    I thought this would be a book about the history of Jell-O and there is a smattering of that, but it really is a memoir filled with way too much whining about life with the blame for bad decisions and misfortune placed on family money from some sort of Jell-O money "curse". I don't lik...

    I read this ARC and was just expecting a family history. It is so very much more. I was stunned reading about all the ways women are silenced. Not in a violent way but through history it has become so subtle and insidious. I've always felt I'm a strong woman but I even could see ways t...

    A fascinating, generational biography/memior of three heiresses and their individual interpretations of their family "curse." Rowbottom covers feminism, family drama, and the fate of sick girls in the hands of a patriarchal medical system. For fans of sweeping family stories, repressed...

    This is a DNF for me. I wanted to like the book but I struggled to stay engaged. The story wandered all over the place and I lost interest in trying to discern the central point. Thank you for the ARC. ...

  • Donna Bailey
    Aug 13, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...

    The concept of this book was very attractive to me. I really wanted to like this book, but somehow this book fell flat for me. This book seems disjointed in parts, and follows a lot of threads, and can be difficult to follow at times. I caught myself going back to see if I had missed s...

    Ok book. Guess I was hoping for less misery and more jello ...

  • Melissa
    Jun 13, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

  • Lloyd
    Jul 24, 2018

    This book is an utter phenomenon. You will start it and be unable to put it down. What Rowbottom accomplishes here is seamless: heartbreaking confession and cultural history, exacting personal observation and important feminist text for our times. ...

    The book contains shocking, often poetic, imagery to describe the anguish that the author, her mother, and her grandmother endured due to the constraining culture of a "Jell-O" family. But here's the problem: what works as poetry, works less well when writing a memoir/autobiography, be...

    Many of the early reviews of The Jell-O Girls describe it as a feminist book. I wish I could see it that way, but I don't. There are several stories here fighting for attention in The Jell-O Girls. The one that takes up the most space is that of the author, her mother, and her grandmot...

    This is less about the history of Jello and the struggles of feminism and more about the many woes of a wealthy and destructive family. Blaming all misfortune on a "curse" and the patriarchy came across as dull and self indulgent. I found myself rolling my eyes more often than not. I h...

    Jell-O Girls AKA The Patriarchy Is terrible Even IF You Are A Rich White Lady I was expecting either the dark underbelly to the wholesome Jell-O company or some great family drama about the creators of Jell-O, but what I got was the story of three woman who came into Jell-O money desp...

    Do not recommend. I love a good family drama, but this was snoozeville. This is the actual story of the Jell-O dynasty apparently. The women are "cursed." ZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZzzz The author also did the narration and nearly put me to sleep. If you read this one, I don't recommend the audio....

    I was looking forward to this read about the history of jell-o for my food writing blog. However, my expectations were cut short as I began to read. This is more of a memoir about a family stricken with illness in its many forms. It was a bit too depressing for me. There are bits a...

    What the heck is going on here? This book is all over the place. I gave up. ...

    After reading the Jell-O Girls, I think the author and her mother were victims of what is known as a self fulfilling prophecy. The author's mother, Mary, was told about a curse that befell the men in the family. Naturally, when bad things happened to her, she became convinced it w...

    As a born and bred Mississippian and feminist who was practically raised on Jello in its myriad forms - and is thrilled by its presence in little old lady salads on my rare trips home - I eagerly anticipated this book. I was incredibly disappointed. This could have been an engag...

    This contains very little about Jello but does include every gory detail about the author?s grandmother and mother suffering through cancer, turning this into the saddest book ever. DNF ...

    Okay, so supposedly there's this curse on the family that owns the Jell-O copyright. Creepy! The men in the family all die because of...well, money? Like, they marry gold-diggers and then end up broke and commit suicide. Alrighty, sounds like less of a curse than just poor choices, but...

    I really liked the first quarter of this book, and then I started to lose interest. My opinion will be in the minority, I?m sure, but it just didn?t work for me. Bummed. ...

    Didn't care for this book at all and how it was written. I expected more on the history of Jell-O and stories on family that were actually involved in running the company. Not in this book. Just 3 women who spend and live off the family fortune who in the end talk very poorly of the pr...

    Allie Rowbottom is not part of the Jello family and her perspective is through the eyes of her mother who has no blood relation to the Woodward family that founded the Jello company. ...