God: A Human History

God: A Human History

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER ? The bestselling author of Zealot and host of Believer explores humanity?s quest to make sense of the divine in this concise and fascinating history of our understanding of God.   In Zealot, Reza Aslan replaced the staid, well-worn portrayal of Jesus of Nazareth with a startling new image of the man in all his contradictions. In his new book, Asla NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER ? The bestselling author of Zealot and host of Believer explores humanity?s quest ...

DownloadRead Online
Title:God: A Human History
Author:Reza Aslan
Rating:
Genres:Religion
ISBN:B01MR8VAQF
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:321 pages pages

God: A Human History Reviews

  • Nisha D
    Apr 23, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    I enjoyed this quick read and had some interesting conversations about it with friends. I think I'd rate it 3.5 stars. The good: The research in this book is very current and consistent with other sources I've encountered. Aslan is respectful and fair to all of the groups he dis...

    An extremely interesting, easily-read, and throughs-provoking book, Aslan takes us through the history of, not religion, per se, but the history of why there?s religion, and how man has created god, over and over again, in his own image. Adam and Eve are two people who come ?out...

    This book fell short for me especially in the last third of the book. In the first part of the book Aslan writes about the evolution of God and how humans created God in their own image since the beginning of our history. There was a lot to think about in that part of the book for me a...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    I really enjoyed this. I think it's fair to say that the reader is best served approaching this as a memoir of one man's personal arc of spiritual discovery as played out against the backdrop of the history of religious expression and thought. It's not a straightforward history (nor is...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

    Overall this was an interesting book on the evolution of the concept of God. I enjoyed it more than his other books. ...

  • Heather
    Mar 02, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

  • Clif Hostetler
    Aug 28, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

  • Mehrsa
    Nov 10, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

  • Kent Winward
    Feb 07, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

  • Melike
    Apr 04, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    I enjoyed this quick read and had some interesting conversations about it with friends. I think I'd rate it 3.5 stars. The good: The research in this book is very current and consistent with other sources I've encountered. Aslan is respectful and fair to all of the groups he dis...

    An extremely interesting, easily-read, and throughs-provoking book, Aslan takes us through the history of, not religion, per se, but the history of why there?s religion, and how man has created god, over and over again, in his own image. Adam and Eve are two people who come ?out...

    This book fell short for me especially in the last third of the book. In the first part of the book Aslan writes about the evolution of God and how humans created God in their own image since the beginning of our history. There was a lot to think about in that part of the book for me a...

  • Mitchell
    Jan 24, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    I enjoyed this quick read and had some interesting conversations about it with friends. I think I'd rate it 3.5 stars. The good: The research in this book is very current and consistent with other sources I've encountered. Aslan is respectful and fair to all of the groups he dis...

    An extremely interesting, easily-read, and throughs-provoking book, Aslan takes us through the history of, not religion, per se, but the history of why there?s religion, and how man has created god, over and over again, in his own image. Adam and Eve are two people who come ?out...

    This book fell short for me especially in the last third of the book. In the first part of the book Aslan writes about the evolution of God and how humans created God in their own image since the beginning of our history. There was a lot to think about in that part of the book for me a...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    I really enjoyed this. I think it's fair to say that the reader is best served approaching this as a memoir of one man's personal arc of spiritual discovery as played out against the backdrop of the history of religious expression and thought. It's not a straightforward history (nor is...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

  • Krista
    Oct 15, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

  • Rebecca Foster
    Oct 23, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

  • Ksenia Everton
    Apr 20, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    I enjoyed this quick read and had some interesting conversations about it with friends. I think I'd rate it 3.5 stars. The good: The research in this book is very current and consistent with other sources I've encountered. Aslan is respectful and fair to all of the groups he dis...

  • Owlseyes
    Jul 09, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

  • Jeff
    Nov 12, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    I enjoyed this quick read and had some interesting conversations about it with friends. I think I'd rate it 3.5 stars. The good: The research in this book is very current and consistent with other sources I've encountered. Aslan is respectful and fair to all of the groups he dis...

    An extremely interesting, easily-read, and throughs-provoking book, Aslan takes us through the history of, not religion, per se, but the history of why there?s religion, and how man has created god, over and over again, in his own image. Adam and Eve are two people who come ?out...

    This book fell short for me especially in the last third of the book. In the first part of the book Aslan writes about the evolution of God and how humans created God in their own image since the beginning of our history. There was a lot to think about in that part of the book for me a...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

  • Dan Graser
    Nov 24, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

  • Roger DeBlanck
    Nov 17, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

  • Fiona
    Sep 22, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

  • Cindy Leighton
    Dec 10, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

  • Tariq Ibrahim
    Mar 27, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

  • Daniel
    Nov 19, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    I enjoyed this quick read and had some interesting conversations about it with friends. I think I'd rate it 3.5 stars. The good: The research in this book is very current and consistent with other sources I've encountered. Aslan is respectful and fair to all of the groups he dis...

    An extremely interesting, easily-read, and throughs-provoking book, Aslan takes us through the history of, not religion, per se, but the history of why there?s religion, and how man has created god, over and over again, in his own image. Adam and Eve are two people who come ?out...

    This book fell short for me especially in the last third of the book. In the first part of the book Aslan writes about the evolution of God and how humans created God in their own image since the beginning of our history. There was a lot to think about in that part of the book for me a...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    I really enjoyed this. I think it's fair to say that the reader is best served approaching this as a memoir of one man's personal arc of spiritual discovery as played out against the backdrop of the history of religious expression and thought. It's not a straightforward history (nor is...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

  • Nichole
    Mar 11, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    I enjoyed this quick read and had some interesting conversations about it with friends. I think I'd rate it 3.5 stars. The good: The research in this book is very current and consistent with other sources I've encountered. Aslan is respectful and fair to all of the groups he dis...

    An extremely interesting, easily-read, and throughs-provoking book, Aslan takes us through the history of, not religion, per se, but the history of why there?s religion, and how man has created god, over and over again, in his own image. Adam and Eve are two people who come ?out...

    This book fell short for me especially in the last third of the book. In the first part of the book Aslan writes about the evolution of God and how humans created God in their own image since the beginning of our history. There was a lot to think about in that part of the book for me a...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    I really enjoyed this. I think it's fair to say that the reader is best served approaching this as a memoir of one man's personal arc of spiritual discovery as played out against the backdrop of the history of religious expression and thought. It's not a straightforward history (nor is...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

    I enjoyed this book that details the evolution of religion. What Aslan describes is how throughout history civilizations consistently defined god/gods in their own image, often attributing human traits to those they worship. This led to rituals such as animal sacrifices to fed the gods...

    review to come ...

    Overall this was an interesting book on the evolution of the concept of God. I enjoyed it more than his other books. ...

    I have always found religion fascinating and have studied religions for a long time. I found this book really interesting. Why does essentially every religion humanize god? I concluded that it is because humans are naturally selfish and think they are the center of everything, and also...

  • Dan
    Nov 16, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

  • Phil
    Jan 30, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    I enjoyed this quick read and had some interesting conversations about it with friends. I think I'd rate it 3.5 stars. The good: The research in this book is very current and consistent with other sources I've encountered. Aslan is respectful and fair to all of the groups he dis...

    An extremely interesting, easily-read, and throughs-provoking book, Aslan takes us through the history of, not religion, per se, but the history of why there?s religion, and how man has created god, over and over again, in his own image. Adam and Eve are two people who come ?out...

    This book fell short for me especially in the last third of the book. In the first part of the book Aslan writes about the evolution of God and how humans created God in their own image since the beginning of our history. There was a lot to think about in that part of the book for me a...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    I really enjoyed this. I think it's fair to say that the reader is best served approaching this as a memoir of one man's personal arc of spiritual discovery as played out against the backdrop of the history of religious expression and thought. It's not a straightforward history (nor is...

    Perhaps 'Zealot' set the bar too high for me. While I enjoyed Zealot as a comprehensive, fully-realized vision of Aslan?s interpretation of Jesus, I find 'God' to come up short. Aslan casts too wide of a net, trying to explore the meaning of the world?s great religions in 171 pages...

  • Annikky
    Nov 02, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

  • Caidyn (SEMI-HIATUS; BW Reviews; he/him/his)
    Oct 20, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

  • Gilda Felt
    Jul 29, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    I enjoyed this quick read and had some interesting conversations about it with friends. I think I'd rate it 3.5 stars. The good: The research in this book is very current and consistent with other sources I've encountered. Aslan is respectful and fair to all of the groups he dis...

    An extremely interesting, easily-read, and throughs-provoking book, Aslan takes us through the history of, not religion, per se, but the history of why there?s religion, and how man has created god, over and over again, in his own image. Adam and Eve are two people who come ?out...

  • Marilynn Spiegel
    Nov 22, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

  • Molly
    Sep 19, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

    I enjoyed this quick read and had some interesting conversations about it with friends. I think I'd rate it 3.5 stars. The good: The research in this book is very current and consistent with other sources I've encountered. Aslan is respectful and fair to all of the groups he dis...

    An extremely interesting, easily-read, and throughs-provoking book, Aslan takes us through the history of, not religion, per se, but the history of why there?s religion, and how man has created god, over and over again, in his own image. Adam and Eve are two people who come ?out...

    This book fell short for me especially in the last third of the book. In the first part of the book Aslan writes about the evolution of God and how humans created God in their own image since the beginning of our history. There was a lot to think about in that part of the book for me a...

    God is made in man's image, not the other way around, and Aslan documents this truth from ancient cultures around the world, also showing how and why humans moved from a pantheon of gods to a single God. His book is scholarly/heavily footnoted, but also quite engaging -- and short! Fa...

    I really enjoyed this. I think it's fair to say that the reader is best served approaching this as a memoir of one man's personal arc of spiritual discovery as played out against the backdrop of the history of religious expression and thought. It's not a straightforward history (nor is...

  • Anton
    Sep 27, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

  • Kristy K
    Oct 18, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

  • Nicole
    Nov 18, 2017

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...

    Aslan reminds me a lot of Harari - both are intelligent, extremely accessible and bold and love to paint with a very broad brush. They also cover some similar ground, although Aslan is more narrowly focused on religious themes. For some reason, I also find him less irritating than Hara...

    For 90+% of this book, I was fascinated. It's an engaging history of the development of humankind's relationship to the divine, from prehistoric (i.e, neanderthal) times up to, roughly, the development and spread of the most recent major western religion, Islam. It ties in psychology a...

    I suppose if you have never considered the case that humans have fashioned the, "divine," in their own image for thousands of years then there may be something interesting here. I suppose if you know nothing of early monotheisms that predate the one you may subscribe to then there m...

    ??? ??? ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ?????? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ?? ???? ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???? ???? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ??? ...

    Fascinating and thought provoking, Aslan attempts to trace the development of the concept of a soul throughout human existence, and also of a deity/deities with human attributes and virtues - one who is actively involved in human life. Almost half the book is footnotes and bibliography...

    Reza Aslan is both a brilliant scholar and a skillful storyteller. 'God: A Human History' is fascinating, educational and accessible. It is as much an explanation of the way in which we have given God human qualities as it is a history of the rise of monotheism, two stories which are i...

  • Haroon
    Jan 12, 2018

    In July, I read a book called Evolving Brains, Emerging Gods: Early Humans and the Origins of Religion by E. Fuller Torrey. It presents the evolutionary theory of the creation of gods by examining the cognitive development of man and I found it truly fascinating. In this short work,...

    This book provides a human history with particular focus on the human tendency to imagine divine agency as a part of life. As far back as evidence of human life exists, there is evidence of a spiritual aspect in their art, charms, monuments and burials. This includes relatives of moder...

    Although comparable in scope to Karen Armstrong?s A History of God, this is more of an anthropological and sociological approach to how religion arose. We created God in our image, Aslan argues. Using ?Adam? and ?Eve? as representatives of primitive humans, he explores what s...

    This book is well written and fascinating. As an Iranian, I especially love that he includes the vital history of God and religion that began in Iran. The content however is very similar to Robert Wright?s Evolution is God and Karen Armstrong?s history of God. But I suppose the out...

    5 ? stuff. Many thanks to NetGalley, publisher and author for sharing the ARC. Honestly, my experience with ARCs so far was very disappointing. Also, I haven't encountered Reza Aslan before. So my expectations were pretty low to start with. But then I started reading... and wa...

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for an advanced copy! All opinions here are my own and are not influenced by them. Admittedly, I do love Reza Aslan, though. I?ve read two of his books and one of them completely change...

    Each of Reza Aslan?s previous books made a lasting impression on me. God: A Human History is no different. It is an empowering study that relies on impeccable scholarship and yet reads with the lyricism and emotion of great literature. All the while, Aslan maintains a page-turning na...

    Not bad for looking at theories on how humanity creates its gods. I was interested to note that as Aslan comes out as a pantheist at the end and his extreme pantheism isn't all that different from atheism -- one is everything, every moment, every object, every particle is God vs. nothi...

    I am, in my essential reality, God made manifest. We all are. So then, worship God not through fear and trembling but through awe and wonder at the workings of the universe ? for the universe is God. Pray to God not to ask for things but to become one with God. Recognize that the kn...

    81% of white evangelicals voted for Trump 67% of color evangelicals voted for Hillary Reza sees race in the numbers. Do you? "I am not the first person to point this out: There?s been a cultish quality to President Trump?s most ardent supporters. Throughout the campaign, and...

    Read this once and then immediately read it again. Aslan is such a thoughtful, gifted scholar, and I appreciate that he makes scholarly writing so accessible. That said, this book isn?t quite what I expected. It is primarily a history of how monotheism and the humanization of God cam...

    The author begins with an illogical premise and spirals downward from there. His original premise ignores the three basic Laws of Thought: the law of identity, the law of excluded middle and the law of non-contradiction. Aslan is an ethical relativist who has never examined his own tho...

    "What is God? That question has been st the center of the human quest to make sense of the divine from the very beginning." This was a lot shorter than I expected, the actual content taking up only about 50% of the book. However, the rest of the book is the authors bibliography, not...

    "All is One, and One is all. It is simply up to the individual to decide what "the One" is: how it should be defined, and how it should be experienced." - Reza Aslan. The author takes us on a journey through history and the evolution of 'God' as Lennon put it 'God is a concept' coming ...