Stalking God: From Laughing Yoga to Burning Man, My Unorthodox Search for Something to Believe In

Stalking God: From Laughing Yoga to Burning Man, My Unorthodox Search for Something to Believe In

Anjali Kumar was a card-carrying member of a rapidly growing contingent in America: highly spiritual but religiously uncommitted. But then she learned she was pregnant, and became compelled to find God--or at least some kind of enlightenment. Convinced that traditional religions were not a fit for her, and knowing that she couldn't simply Google an answer to "What is the me Anjali Kumar was a card-carrying member of a rapidly growing contingent in America: highly spiritual but religiously ...

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Title:Stalking God: From Laughing Yoga to Burning Man, My Unorthodox Search for Something to Believe In
Author:Anjali Kumar
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:158005661X
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:256 pages pages

Stalking God: From Laughing Yoga to Burning Man, My Unorthodox Search for Something to Believe In Reviews

  • Kelly
    Jul 27, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

  • David
    Oct 05, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

  • Jessica
    Mar 10, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

    As a former western philosophy professor who has also done her share of mystical seeking, this book spoke to me! I enjoyed hearing Kumar, who at the time was head counsel for Google, talk about her attempts to find a connection to something greater. Her account of suffering on a dank y...

    I absolutely adored this book. Anjali?s writing style is refreshingly funny and relatable. Her story is filled with profound insights on the human condition and the insecurities we all encounter on this beautiful blue ball in space. I admittedly ?lost it? and felt tears on my fac...

    Kinda fun. Hard for me to relate to an upper middle class corporate lawyer who knows people who wear fancy clothes and know fancy people and who can get on jets and fly all over the place. Kinda fun. ...

    Eh it was ok. I thought it would be more eye opening and insightful. I enjoyed the scientific tie-in's since I can be pretty skeptical. The sheet randomness of the book was refreshing but not as impactful as I had hoped. All that being said, it's an easy and often entertaining read. ...

  • Jacqueline
    Feb 25, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

  • Jennifer
    Mar 04, 2019

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

    As a former western philosophy professor who has also done her share of mystical seeking, this book spoke to me! I enjoyed hearing Kumar, who at the time was head counsel for Google, talk about her attempts to find a connection to something greater. Her account of suffering on a dank y...

    I absolutely adored this book. Anjali?s writing style is refreshingly funny and relatable. Her story is filled with profound insights on the human condition and the insecurities we all encounter on this beautiful blue ball in space. I admittedly ?lost it? and felt tears on my fac...

    Kinda fun. Hard for me to relate to an upper middle class corporate lawyer who knows people who wear fancy clothes and know fancy people and who can get on jets and fly all over the place. Kinda fun. ...

    Eh it was ok. I thought it would be more eye opening and insightful. I enjoyed the scientific tie-in's since I can be pretty skeptical. The sheet randomness of the book was refreshing but not as impactful as I had hoped. All that being said, it's an easy and often entertaining read. ...

    Interesting but not enough emotion Reads too much like a textbook. It is all relevant but didn't keep me engaged. It would be nice to have the ability to do it all. ...

  • Randal White
    Dec 04, 2017

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

  • Jim
    Apr 12, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

    As a former western philosophy professor who has also done her share of mystical seeking, this book spoke to me! I enjoyed hearing Kumar, who at the time was head counsel for Google, talk about her attempts to find a connection to something greater. Her account of suffering on a dank y...

    I absolutely adored this book. Anjali?s writing style is refreshingly funny and relatable. Her story is filled with profound insights on the human condition and the insecurities we all encounter on this beautiful blue ball in space. I admittedly ?lost it? and felt tears on my fac...

    Kinda fun. Hard for me to relate to an upper middle class corporate lawyer who knows people who wear fancy clothes and know fancy people and who can get on jets and fly all over the place. Kinda fun. ...

    Eh it was ok. I thought it would be more eye opening and insightful. I enjoyed the scientific tie-in's since I can be pretty skeptical. The sheet randomness of the book was refreshing but not as impactful as I had hoped. All that being said, it's an easy and often entertaining read. ...

    Interesting but not enough emotion Reads too much like a textbook. It is all relevant but didn't keep me engaged. It would be nice to have the ability to do it all. ...

    4.5. Such an enjoyable read. Several parts made me laugh until I was crying. And as others have said, now I don?t need to go to Burning Man. Thank you! ...

    Had to abandon this book... unfortunately. The author is interesting, does interesting things but this reads more like a personal diary. ...

    The author went on some really strange adventures, but came away with some simple but important insights. A very enjoyable read with a LOT of humor. ...

  • Marcus
    Feb 11, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

    As a former western philosophy professor who has also done her share of mystical seeking, this book spoke to me! I enjoyed hearing Kumar, who at the time was head counsel for Google, talk about her attempts to find a connection to something greater. Her account of suffering on a dank y...

    I absolutely adored this book. Anjali?s writing style is refreshingly funny and relatable. Her story is filled with profound insights on the human condition and the insecurities we all encounter on this beautiful blue ball in space. I admittedly ?lost it? and felt tears on my fac...

    Kinda fun. Hard for me to relate to an upper middle class corporate lawyer who knows people who wear fancy clothes and know fancy people and who can get on jets and fly all over the place. Kinda fun. ...

    Eh it was ok. I thought it would be more eye opening and insightful. I enjoyed the scientific tie-in's since I can be pretty skeptical. The sheet randomness of the book was refreshing but not as impactful as I had hoped. All that being said, it's an easy and often entertaining read. ...

    Interesting but not enough emotion Reads too much like a textbook. It is all relevant but didn't keep me engaged. It would be nice to have the ability to do it all. ...

    4.5. Such an enjoyable read. Several parts made me laugh until I was crying. And as others have said, now I don?t need to go to Burning Man. Thank you! ...

    Had to abandon this book... unfortunately. The author is interesting, does interesting things but this reads more like a personal diary. ...

    The author went on some really strange adventures, but came away with some simple but important insights. A very enjoyable read with a LOT of humor. ...

    I learned about myself that I am not one for spiritual sampling other than the sense of commonality in life truisms. I did find her experience at Burning Man interesting. ...

    Lighthearted, humorous, enlightening...spirituality 101. Loved it. My take-away is to at least learn TM. ...

    ...

  • Gail
    Apr 08, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

    As a former western philosophy professor who has also done her share of mystical seeking, this book spoke to me! I enjoyed hearing Kumar, who at the time was head counsel for Google, talk about her attempts to find a connection to something greater. Her account of suffering on a dank y...

    I absolutely adored this book. Anjali?s writing style is refreshingly funny and relatable. Her story is filled with profound insights on the human condition and the insecurities we all encounter on this beautiful blue ball in space. I admittedly ?lost it? and felt tears on my fac...

    Kinda fun. Hard for me to relate to an upper middle class corporate lawyer who knows people who wear fancy clothes and know fancy people and who can get on jets and fly all over the place. Kinda fun. ...

    Eh it was ok. I thought it would be more eye opening and insightful. I enjoyed the scientific tie-in's since I can be pretty skeptical. The sheet randomness of the book was refreshing but not as impactful as I had hoped. All that being said, it's an easy and often entertaining read. ...

    Interesting but not enough emotion Reads too much like a textbook. It is all relevant but didn't keep me engaged. It would be nice to have the ability to do it all. ...

    4.5. Such an enjoyable read. Several parts made me laugh until I was crying. And as others have said, now I don?t need to go to Burning Man. Thank you! ...

    Had to abandon this book... unfortunately. The author is interesting, does interesting things but this reads more like a personal diary. ...

    The author went on some really strange adventures, but came away with some simple but important insights. A very enjoyable read with a LOT of humor. ...

    I learned about myself that I am not one for spiritual sampling other than the sense of commonality in life truisms. I did find her experience at Burning Man interesting. ...

  • Sue Fernandez
    Jan 25, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

  • Lecy
    Apr 28, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

  • Donita
    Mar 23, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

    As a former western philosophy professor who has also done her share of mystical seeking, this book spoke to me! I enjoyed hearing Kumar, who at the time was head counsel for Google, talk about her attempts to find a connection to something greater. Her account of suffering on a dank y...

    I absolutely adored this book. Anjali?s writing style is refreshingly funny and relatable. Her story is filled with profound insights on the human condition and the insecurities we all encounter on this beautiful blue ball in space. I admittedly ?lost it? and felt tears on my fac...

    Kinda fun. Hard for me to relate to an upper middle class corporate lawyer who knows people who wear fancy clothes and know fancy people and who can get on jets and fly all over the place. Kinda fun. ...

    Eh it was ok. I thought it would be more eye opening and insightful. I enjoyed the scientific tie-in's since I can be pretty skeptical. The sheet randomness of the book was refreshing but not as impactful as I had hoped. All that being said, it's an easy and often entertaining read. ...

    Interesting but not enough emotion Reads too much like a textbook. It is all relevant but didn't keep me engaged. It would be nice to have the ability to do it all. ...

    4.5. Such an enjoyable read. Several parts made me laugh until I was crying. And as others have said, now I don?t need to go to Burning Man. Thank you! ...

  • Rachael Quinn
    May 30, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

  • Lorilin
    Feb 08, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

  • Aubrey Craft Jr
    Mar 07, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

    As a former western philosophy professor who has also done her share of mystical seeking, this book spoke to me! I enjoyed hearing Kumar, who at the time was head counsel for Google, talk about her attempts to find a connection to something greater. Her account of suffering on a dank y...

    I absolutely adored this book. Anjali?s writing style is refreshingly funny and relatable. Her story is filled with profound insights on the human condition and the insecurities we all encounter on this beautiful blue ball in space. I admittedly ?lost it? and felt tears on my fac...

  • Heidi The Hippie Reader
    Jan 01, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

  • Neelam Babul
    Sep 28, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

  • Caroline Brewer
    May 10, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

  • Caitlin
    Jul 25, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

  • Joseph Weyek
    Feb 08, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

    As a former western philosophy professor who has also done her share of mystical seeking, this book spoke to me! I enjoyed hearing Kumar, who at the time was head counsel for Google, talk about her attempts to find a connection to something greater. Her account of suffering on a dank y...

    I absolutely adored this book. Anjali?s writing style is refreshingly funny and relatable. Her story is filled with profound insights on the human condition and the insecurities we all encounter on this beautiful blue ball in space. I admittedly ?lost it? and felt tears on my fac...

    Kinda fun. Hard for me to relate to an upper middle class corporate lawyer who knows people who wear fancy clothes and know fancy people and who can get on jets and fly all over the place. Kinda fun. ...

  • Sammantha Tillotson
    Dec 11, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

  • Lynda Lippin
    Dec 26, 2017

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

    As a former western philosophy professor who has also done her share of mystical seeking, this book spoke to me! I enjoyed hearing Kumar, who at the time was head counsel for Google, talk about her attempts to find a connection to something greater. Her account of suffering on a dank y...

  • Cyndy
    May 29, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

    As a former western philosophy professor who has also done her share of mystical seeking, this book spoke to me! I enjoyed hearing Kumar, who at the time was head counsel for Google, talk about her attempts to find a connection to something greater. Her account of suffering on a dank y...

    I absolutely adored this book. Anjali?s writing style is refreshingly funny and relatable. Her story is filled with profound insights on the human condition and the insecurities we all encounter on this beautiful blue ball in space. I admittedly ?lost it? and felt tears on my fac...

    Kinda fun. Hard for me to relate to an upper middle class corporate lawyer who knows people who wear fancy clothes and know fancy people and who can get on jets and fly all over the place. Kinda fun. ...

    Eh it was ok. I thought it would be more eye opening and insightful. I enjoyed the scientific tie-in's since I can be pretty skeptical. The sheet randomness of the book was refreshing but not as impactful as I had hoped. All that being said, it's an easy and often entertaining read. ...

    Interesting but not enough emotion Reads too much like a textbook. It is all relevant but didn't keep me engaged. It would be nice to have the ability to do it all. ...

    4.5. Such an enjoyable read. Several parts made me laugh until I was crying. And as others have said, now I don?t need to go to Burning Man. Thank you! ...

    Had to abandon this book... unfortunately. The author is interesting, does interesting things but this reads more like a personal diary. ...

    The author went on some really strange adventures, but came away with some simple but important insights. A very enjoyable read with a LOT of humor. ...

    I learned about myself that I am not one for spiritual sampling other than the sense of commonality in life truisms. I did find her experience at Burning Man interesting. ...

    Lighthearted, humorous, enlightening...spirituality 101. Loved it. My take-away is to at least learn TM. ...

  • Poonam Desai
    Jan 06, 2019

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

  • Janet
    Feb 02, 2019

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

    As a former western philosophy professor who has also done her share of mystical seeking, this book spoke to me! I enjoyed hearing Kumar, who at the time was head counsel for Google, talk about her attempts to find a connection to something greater. Her account of suffering on a dank y...

    I absolutely adored this book. Anjali?s writing style is refreshingly funny and relatable. Her story is filled with profound insights on the human condition and the insecurities we all encounter on this beautiful blue ball in space. I admittedly ?lost it? and felt tears on my fac...

    Kinda fun. Hard for me to relate to an upper middle class corporate lawyer who knows people who wear fancy clothes and know fancy people and who can get on jets and fly all over the place. Kinda fun. ...

    Eh it was ok. I thought it would be more eye opening and insightful. I enjoyed the scientific tie-in's since I can be pretty skeptical. The sheet randomness of the book was refreshing but not as impactful as I had hoped. All that being said, it's an easy and often entertaining read. ...

    Interesting but not enough emotion Reads too much like a textbook. It is all relevant but didn't keep me engaged. It would be nice to have the ability to do it all. ...

    4.5. Such an enjoyable read. Several parts made me laugh until I was crying. And as others have said, now I don?t need to go to Burning Man. Thank you! ...

    Had to abandon this book... unfortunately. The author is interesting, does interesting things but this reads more like a personal diary. ...

    The author went on some really strange adventures, but came away with some simple but important insights. A very enjoyable read with a LOT of humor. ...

    I learned about myself that I am not one for spiritual sampling other than the sense of commonality in life truisms. I did find her experience at Burning Man interesting. ...

    Lighthearted, humorous, enlightening...spirituality 101. Loved it. My take-away is to at least learn TM. ...

    ...

    ...

  • Elizabeth
    Dec 06, 2017

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

  • Preethi Kavilikatta
    May 08, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

    Anjali Kumar reminds me a lot of me- similar background, interests, process of inquiry. I?m glad she went on this journey, because in a way it relieved me of needing to. That being said, I wasn?t particularly wowed by anything in the book. For people who identify as very spiritual ...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is a humble piece about Anjali's search for a spiritual home that she can share with her daughter. I thought t was very well written and interesting. I love how Anjali approaches this serious question with an open heart, a sense of humor, and a real desir...

    As a former western philosophy professor who has also done her share of mystical seeking, this book spoke to me! I enjoyed hearing Kumar, who at the time was head counsel for Google, talk about her attempts to find a connection to something greater. Her account of suffering on a dank y...

    I absolutely adored this book. Anjali?s writing style is refreshingly funny and relatable. Her story is filled with profound insights on the human condition and the insecurities we all encounter on this beautiful blue ball in space. I admittedly ?lost it? and felt tears on my fac...

    Kinda fun. Hard for me to relate to an upper middle class corporate lawyer who knows people who wear fancy clothes and know fancy people and who can get on jets and fly all over the place. Kinda fun. ...

    Eh it was ok. I thought it would be more eye opening and insightful. I enjoyed the scientific tie-in's since I can be pretty skeptical. The sheet randomness of the book was refreshing but not as impactful as I had hoped. All that being said, it's an easy and often entertaining read. ...

    Interesting but not enough emotion Reads too much like a textbook. It is all relevant but didn't keep me engaged. It would be nice to have the ability to do it all. ...

    4.5. Such an enjoyable read. Several parts made me laugh until I was crying. And as others have said, now I don?t need to go to Burning Man. Thank you! ...

    Had to abandon this book... unfortunately. The author is interesting, does interesting things but this reads more like a personal diary. ...

  • Jyoty
    Mar 30, 2018

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

    Anjali Kumar references Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love (both the book, and the movie based on it, validly distinguishing between the two) many times in Stalking God. Maybe one wouldn't exist without the other, but Kumar's book is so much better than Gilbert's that I'm sad it hasn'...

    funny, self-deprecating young Mom sets out on a world tour [sweat lodge, Burning Man, silent meditation retreat, faith healer, magic mushrooms.....] of possible paths to spirituality, with an eye toward being able to give her daughter answers to questions about why we're here, whether ...

    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. I lived vicariously through her journey for the meaning of life. I have always been curious about many of the ?off the beaten path? religions she experienced, so this was a great way to get the ?inside? scoop on the religions with candid and humo...

  • Israel Morrow
    Jan 20, 2019

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...

    It's been a strange year for me.  The Little Dude is now 14 months old and the discussion of what religious views to raise him with have pretty much dissipated completely.  That doesn't mean that I haven't been thinking about it, though, and thinking about it has led me on a bit of m...

    I'm interested in reading accounts of how people who come to their spiritual and/or religious beliefs; however, this one, while definitely entertaining here and there, felt hard to relate with. This is not because of my own faith, but because the author often reminded the reader of the...

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this title in exchange for my honest review. While Anjali Kumar is a lawyer, coming from the tech world, married to a doctor, and I'm just a middle aged women who has long wondered the same questions, I felt a kinship with her. I d...

    For a memoir, it feels inauthentic. Kumar focuses too much on her personal qualms without giving much background information about her life to make her existential questions seem relevant. She also tends to neglect the narrative itself, dealing more with said qualms than with her actua...

  • Novelliterati
    Mar 03, 2019

    Anjali Kumar is a lawyer who is used to having all the answers. After she had a daughter, Anjali realized she knew very little about the big questions: why are we here? What is it all about? Is there a God? "In 2010, when my daughter Zia was born, I decided that I needed to find God...

    After Anjali Kumar has a baby, she decides she needs greater spiritual understanding---mostly so she knows what to tell her daughter when her daughter asks: Why are we here? What is the meaning of life? What happens when we die? Is there a God? So Kumar goes on a quest for ans...

    This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but it absolutely delighted me. The book begins when Anjali decides she wants to find "something to believe in" following the birth of her daughter. After not growing up with a religious faith, she decided to pursue a wild array of different spiritu...

    The Search For The Meaning Of Life The author, a successful business person and mother, came to the decision that she had to find the answer to THE BIG QUESTIONS in order to explain them rationally to her young daughter. The four big questions of life. Why are we here? What is the mean...

    I heard about this book from a podcast and I was intrigued by the premise of this book. After Anjali Kumar has her first child, a baby girl she feels she needs greater spiritual understanding in order to answer questions that her daughter could possibly ask in the future:- Why are w...

    This book was less about seeking God and more about looking for spirituality and Kumar went looking for it everywhere. From Machu Picchu to Japan, Anjali traveled the globe to immerse herself in a variety of spiritual experiences like living in a communal R.V. at Burning Man to feastin...

    I love a good search for your spirit book and this doesn?t disappoint. Plus, now I don?t have to go to Burning Man! ...

    This book was more of a memoir of a religious pursuit of happiness. I personally did not care for it, I expected it to be told more like a story rather than an itinerary of the authors adventures in finding her way. It was well written, just not in a style I personally prefer. If you l...

    Have you ever ruminated on the big questions on life and existence? If your answer is ?yes?, then make no delay in picking up this book. Anjali Kumar, a lawyer for Google, decides to Google God as she finds herself accountable to answer her daughter on questions regarding religion,...