Twilight of the Gods: A Journey to the End of Classic Rock

Twilight of the Gods: A Journey to the End of Classic Rock

A New York Times Book Review "New and Noteworthy" selection One of Newsweek's 50 Best Books of 2018 ?A wise meditation on why classic rock stars keep trucking, both on the road and in our dreams. Every page is an irresistible argument starter.??Rob Sheffield, Rolling Stone The author of the critically acclaimed Your Favorite Band is Killing Me offers an eye-opening exploratio A New York Times Book Review "New and Noteworthy" selection One of Newsweek's 50 Best Books of 2018...

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Title:Twilight of the Gods: A Journey to the End of Classic Rock
Author:Steven Hyden
Rating:
Genres:Music
ISBN:0062657151
Format Type:ebook
Number of Pages:320 pages pages

Twilight of the Gods: A Journey to the End of Classic Rock Reviews

  • Ang
    May 26, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

  • Darrenglass
    Aug 08, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

    3.5 stars. Hyden?s swan song to classic rock is a fun, light read for people just like Hyden: late Gen Xer/early Millennial white guys who grew up listening to classic rock radio in the 90s -- not old enough to see most classic rock musicians in their prime, but just in time to catch...

    I was suspicious of this book. I read Chuck Klosterman's Fargo Rock City years ago, and I remember feeling underwhelmed. That book felt like some dude trying to convince not just us, but himself, of why he likes the music he liked when he was wrong up. Plus, you know how Klosterman is ...

    Hyden lays out his love for classic rock, which he defines as beginning with SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND (he thinks A HARD DAY'S NIGHT was a much better album, and I agree) and ending with Nine Inch Nails' 1999 THE FRAGILE, in a book that understands the aesthetic and demogra...

    I?ve gotten a little behind the eight-ball in my reviewing, so my apologies to everyone (the author of this book being reviewed included) for being late on this five-star book. Twilight of the Gods is essentially an essential survey of classic rock and poses the question, is classic ...

    From the very moment I received Twilight of The Gods in the mail, I was hooked. I looked at this book as a look back at the music of my youth. Although Steven Hyden and I liked different bands and artist of CLASSIC ROCK, we both still love the genre. I was more into southern rock and...

    You kids don?t know Grand Funk? The wild shirtless lyrics of Mark Farner? The bong-rattling bass of Mel Schacher? The competent drumwork of Don Brewer? Steve Hyden examines what classic rock means in 2018, now that the music world is completely different, the culture is pretty dif...

    Hyden presents an entertaining look at his journey through the mythology and reality of classic rock, beginning as a teenager listening to the radio and collecting tapes. He winkingly likens it to the heroes journey, beginning with his adolescence and yearning to understand the music h...

    One measure of how good a book is has to be how often you pause your reading to think "I have to tell ______ about this book!, or even how often you do bring it up in conversation. This isn't the only measure, or even the best measure of how good a book is -- I can think of books that ...

  • Gus Sanchez
    May 26, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

  • Stefan Fergus
    Jun 16, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

  • Emily
    Aug 27, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

  • Mike
    Aug 31, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

    3.5 stars. Hyden?s swan song to classic rock is a fun, light read for people just like Hyden: late Gen Xer/early Millennial white guys who grew up listening to classic rock radio in the 90s -- not old enough to see most classic rock musicians in their prime, but just in time to catch...

  • Julie
    Apr 28, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

  • Steve Erickson
    Aug 16, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

    3.5 stars. Hyden?s swan song to classic rock is a fun, light read for people just like Hyden: late Gen Xer/early Millennial white guys who grew up listening to classic rock radio in the 90s -- not old enough to see most classic rock musicians in their prime, but just in time to catch...

    I was suspicious of this book. I read Chuck Klosterman's Fargo Rock City years ago, and I remember feeling underwhelmed. That book felt like some dude trying to convince not just us, but himself, of why he likes the music he liked when he was wrong up. Plus, you know how Klosterman is ...

    Hyden lays out his love for classic rock, which he defines as beginning with SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND (he thinks A HARD DAY'S NIGHT was a much better album, and I agree) and ending with Nine Inch Nails' 1999 THE FRAGILE, in a book that understands the aesthetic and demogra...

  • Silas
    Jul 06, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

    3.5 stars. Hyden?s swan song to classic rock is a fun, light read for people just like Hyden: late Gen Xer/early Millennial white guys who grew up listening to classic rock radio in the 90s -- not old enough to see most classic rock musicians in their prime, but just in time to catch...

    I was suspicious of this book. I read Chuck Klosterman's Fargo Rock City years ago, and I remember feeling underwhelmed. That book felt like some dude trying to convince not just us, but himself, of why he likes the music he liked when he was wrong up. Plus, you know how Klosterman is ...

    Hyden lays out his love for classic rock, which he defines as beginning with SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND (he thinks A HARD DAY'S NIGHT was a much better album, and I agree) and ending with Nine Inch Nails' 1999 THE FRAGILE, in a book that understands the aesthetic and demogra...

    I?ve gotten a little behind the eight-ball in my reviewing, so my apologies to everyone (the author of this book being reviewed included) for being late on this five-star book. Twilight of the Gods is essentially an essential survey of classic rock and poses the question, is classic ...

    From the very moment I received Twilight of The Gods in the mail, I was hooked. I looked at this book as a look back at the music of my youth. Although Steven Hyden and I liked different bands and artist of CLASSIC ROCK, we both still love the genre. I was more into southern rock and...

    You kids don?t know Grand Funk? The wild shirtless lyrics of Mark Farner? The bong-rattling bass of Mel Schacher? The competent drumwork of Don Brewer? Steve Hyden examines what classic rock means in 2018, now that the music world is completely different, the culture is pretty dif...

    Hyden presents an entertaining look at his journey through the mythology and reality of classic rock, beginning as a teenager listening to the radio and collecting tapes. He winkingly likens it to the heroes journey, beginning with his adolescence and yearning to understand the music h...

    One measure of how good a book is has to be how often you pause your reading to think "I have to tell ______ about this book!, or even how often you do bring it up in conversation. This isn't the only measure, or even the best measure of how good a book is -- I can think of books that ...

    Spot on book! I'm from the era this book writes about and enjoyed the read. Some parts gave me a very hearty laugh (Hyden REALLY loathes the Eagles!) And, of course, off stage antics were a good reminisce! In light of all the accusations of sexual misconduct in the news of late, I wond...

    I was slightly disappointed in this book - but only because the bar was set so high by his previous book Your Favorite Band is Killing Me, which just had a tighter premise. That book's "[x] band vs [y] band" structure allowed Hyden to explore dichotomies in a way that was open ended an...

    When I saw this book was coming out, I knew I wanted to read it when it came out. I got it when I saw it was, in audio format, and checked it out. At first, it seemed good. It talked about a lot of bands that I enjoy, but eventually, it became clear this was more of an autobiography or...

  • Alex Daniel
    Sep 11, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

    3.5 stars. Hyden?s swan song to classic rock is a fun, light read for people just like Hyden: late Gen Xer/early Millennial white guys who grew up listening to classic rock radio in the 90s -- not old enough to see most classic rock musicians in their prime, but just in time to catch...

    I was suspicious of this book. I read Chuck Klosterman's Fargo Rock City years ago, and I remember feeling underwhelmed. That book felt like some dude trying to convince not just us, but himself, of why he likes the music he liked when he was wrong up. Plus, you know how Klosterman is ...

  • El_kiablo
    Jun 24, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

    3.5 stars. Hyden?s swan song to classic rock is a fun, light read for people just like Hyden: late Gen Xer/early Millennial white guys who grew up listening to classic rock radio in the 90s -- not old enough to see most classic rock musicians in their prime, but just in time to catch...

    I was suspicious of this book. I read Chuck Klosterman's Fargo Rock City years ago, and I remember feeling underwhelmed. That book felt like some dude trying to convince not just us, but himself, of why he likes the music he liked when he was wrong up. Plus, you know how Klosterman is ...

    Hyden lays out his love for classic rock, which he defines as beginning with SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND (he thinks A HARD DAY'S NIGHT was a much better album, and I agree) and ending with Nine Inch Nails' 1999 THE FRAGILE, in a book that understands the aesthetic and demogra...

    I?ve gotten a little behind the eight-ball in my reviewing, so my apologies to everyone (the author of this book being reviewed included) for being late on this five-star book. Twilight of the Gods is essentially an essential survey of classic rock and poses the question, is classic ...

    From the very moment I received Twilight of The Gods in the mail, I was hooked. I looked at this book as a look back at the music of my youth. Although Steven Hyden and I liked different bands and artist of CLASSIC ROCK, we both still love the genre. I was more into southern rock and...

    You kids don?t know Grand Funk? The wild shirtless lyrics of Mark Farner? The bong-rattling bass of Mel Schacher? The competent drumwork of Don Brewer? Steve Hyden examines what classic rock means in 2018, now that the music world is completely different, the culture is pretty dif...

    Hyden presents an entertaining look at his journey through the mythology and reality of classic rock, beginning as a teenager listening to the radio and collecting tapes. He winkingly likens it to the heroes journey, beginning with his adolescence and yearning to understand the music h...

    One measure of how good a book is has to be how often you pause your reading to think "I have to tell ______ about this book!, or even how often you do bring it up in conversation. This isn't the only measure, or even the best measure of how good a book is -- I can think of books that ...

    Spot on book! I'm from the era this book writes about and enjoyed the read. Some parts gave me a very hearty laugh (Hyden REALLY loathes the Eagles!) And, of course, off stage antics were a good reminisce! In light of all the accusations of sexual misconduct in the news of late, I wond...

    I was slightly disappointed in this book - but only because the bar was set so high by his previous book Your Favorite Band is Killing Me, which just had a tighter premise. That book's "[x] band vs [y] band" structure allowed Hyden to explore dichotomies in a way that was open ended an...

  • Julien L
    Jun 24, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

  • Peter Mcloughlin
    Aug 28, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

  • Michael Mingo
    Aug 12, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

  • Jack Wolfe
    Jul 19, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

  • Ace Boggess
    Feb 04, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

  • Patrick Macke
    Jun 01, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

  • Jake
    Jun 06, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

    3.5 stars. Hyden?s swan song to classic rock is a fun, light read for people just like Hyden: late Gen Xer/early Millennial white guys who grew up listening to classic rock radio in the 90s -- not old enough to see most classic rock musicians in their prime, but just in time to catch...

    I was suspicious of this book. I read Chuck Klosterman's Fargo Rock City years ago, and I remember feeling underwhelmed. That book felt like some dude trying to convince not just us, but himself, of why he likes the music he liked when he was wrong up. Plus, you know how Klosterman is ...

    Hyden lays out his love for classic rock, which he defines as beginning with SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND (he thinks A HARD DAY'S NIGHT was a much better album, and I agree) and ending with Nine Inch Nails' 1999 THE FRAGILE, in a book that understands the aesthetic and demogra...

    I?ve gotten a little behind the eight-ball in my reviewing, so my apologies to everyone (the author of this book being reviewed included) for being late on this five-star book. Twilight of the Gods is essentially an essential survey of classic rock and poses the question, is classic ...

    From the very moment I received Twilight of The Gods in the mail, I was hooked. I looked at this book as a look back at the music of my youth. Although Steven Hyden and I liked different bands and artist of CLASSIC ROCK, we both still love the genre. I was more into southern rock and...

    You kids don?t know Grand Funk? The wild shirtless lyrics of Mark Farner? The bong-rattling bass of Mel Schacher? The competent drumwork of Don Brewer? Steve Hyden examines what classic rock means in 2018, now that the music world is completely different, the culture is pretty dif...

  • Ross
    Jun 11, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

  • William Fluke
    Jun 05, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

  • Dave
    Apr 21, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

  • Quinn
    Sep 15, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

  • John Spiller
    May 26, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

  • Cat
    Jun 06, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

    3.5 stars. Hyden?s swan song to classic rock is a fun, light read for people just like Hyden: late Gen Xer/early Millennial white guys who grew up listening to classic rock radio in the 90s -- not old enough to see most classic rock musicians in their prime, but just in time to catch...

    I was suspicious of this book. I read Chuck Klosterman's Fargo Rock City years ago, and I remember feeling underwhelmed. That book felt like some dude trying to convince not just us, but himself, of why he likes the music he liked when he was wrong up. Plus, you know how Klosterman is ...

    Hyden lays out his love for classic rock, which he defines as beginning with SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND (he thinks A HARD DAY'S NIGHT was a much better album, and I agree) and ending with Nine Inch Nails' 1999 THE FRAGILE, in a book that understands the aesthetic and demogra...

    I?ve gotten a little behind the eight-ball in my reviewing, so my apologies to everyone (the author of this book being reviewed included) for being late on this five-star book. Twilight of the Gods is essentially an essential survey of classic rock and poses the question, is classic ...

    From the very moment I received Twilight of The Gods in the mail, I was hooked. I looked at this book as a look back at the music of my youth. Although Steven Hyden and I liked different bands and artist of CLASSIC ROCK, we both still love the genre. I was more into southern rock and...

    You kids don?t know Grand Funk? The wild shirtless lyrics of Mark Farner? The bong-rattling bass of Mel Schacher? The competent drumwork of Don Brewer? Steve Hyden examines what classic rock means in 2018, now that the music world is completely different, the culture is pretty dif...

    Hyden presents an entertaining look at his journey through the mythology and reality of classic rock, beginning as a teenager listening to the radio and collecting tapes. He winkingly likens it to the heroes journey, beginning with his adolescence and yearning to understand the music h...

    One measure of how good a book is has to be how often you pause your reading to think "I have to tell ______ about this book!, or even how often you do bring it up in conversation. This isn't the only measure, or even the best measure of how good a book is -- I can think of books that ...

    Spot on book! I'm from the era this book writes about and enjoyed the read. Some parts gave me a very hearty laugh (Hyden REALLY loathes the Eagles!) And, of course, off stage antics were a good reminisce! In light of all the accusations of sexual misconduct in the news of late, I wond...

  • Zachary Houle
    May 30, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

    3.5 stars. Hyden?s swan song to classic rock is a fun, light read for people just like Hyden: late Gen Xer/early Millennial white guys who grew up listening to classic rock radio in the 90s -- not old enough to see most classic rock musicians in their prime, but just in time to catch...

    I was suspicious of this book. I read Chuck Klosterman's Fargo Rock City years ago, and I remember feeling underwhelmed. That book felt like some dude trying to convince not just us, but himself, of why he likes the music he liked when he was wrong up. Plus, you know how Klosterman is ...

    Hyden lays out his love for classic rock, which he defines as beginning with SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND (he thinks A HARD DAY'S NIGHT was a much better album, and I agree) and ending with Nine Inch Nails' 1999 THE FRAGILE, in a book that understands the aesthetic and demogra...

    I?ve gotten a little behind the eight-ball in my reviewing, so my apologies to everyone (the author of this book being reviewed included) for being late on this five-star book. Twilight of the Gods is essentially an essential survey of classic rock and poses the question, is classic ...

  • Brett
    Jul 30, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

  • Paul Olkowski
    Jun 07, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

    3.5 stars. Hyden?s swan song to classic rock is a fun, light read for people just like Hyden: late Gen Xer/early Millennial white guys who grew up listening to classic rock radio in the 90s -- not old enough to see most classic rock musicians in their prime, but just in time to catch...

    I was suspicious of this book. I read Chuck Klosterman's Fargo Rock City years ago, and I remember feeling underwhelmed. That book felt like some dude trying to convince not just us, but himself, of why he likes the music he liked when he was wrong up. Plus, you know how Klosterman is ...

    Hyden lays out his love for classic rock, which he defines as beginning with SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND (he thinks A HARD DAY'S NIGHT was a much better album, and I agree) and ending with Nine Inch Nails' 1999 THE FRAGILE, in a book that understands the aesthetic and demogra...

    I?ve gotten a little behind the eight-ball in my reviewing, so my apologies to everyone (the author of this book being reviewed included) for being late on this five-star book. Twilight of the Gods is essentially an essential survey of classic rock and poses the question, is classic ...

    From the very moment I received Twilight of The Gods in the mail, I was hooked. I looked at this book as a look back at the music of my youth. Although Steven Hyden and I liked different bands and artist of CLASSIC ROCK, we both still love the genre. I was more into southern rock and...

  • Hala
    Aug 14, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

    3.5 stars. Hyden?s swan song to classic rock is a fun, light read for people just like Hyden: late Gen Xer/early Millennial white guys who grew up listening to classic rock radio in the 90s -- not old enough to see most classic rock musicians in their prime, but just in time to catch...

    I was suspicious of this book. I read Chuck Klosterman's Fargo Rock City years ago, and I remember feeling underwhelmed. That book felt like some dude trying to convince not just us, but himself, of why he likes the music he liked when he was wrong up. Plus, you know how Klosterman is ...

    Hyden lays out his love for classic rock, which he defines as beginning with SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND (he thinks A HARD DAY'S NIGHT was a much better album, and I agree) and ending with Nine Inch Nails' 1999 THE FRAGILE, in a book that understands the aesthetic and demogra...

    I?ve gotten a little behind the eight-ball in my reviewing, so my apologies to everyone (the author of this book being reviewed included) for being late on this five-star book. Twilight of the Gods is essentially an essential survey of classic rock and poses the question, is classic ...

    From the very moment I received Twilight of The Gods in the mail, I was hooked. I looked at this book as a look back at the music of my youth. Although Steven Hyden and I liked different bands and artist of CLASSIC ROCK, we both still love the genre. I was more into southern rock and...

    You kids don?t know Grand Funk? The wild shirtless lyrics of Mark Farner? The bong-rattling bass of Mel Schacher? The competent drumwork of Don Brewer? Steve Hyden examines what classic rock means in 2018, now that the music world is completely different, the culture is pretty dif...

    Hyden presents an entertaining look at his journey through the mythology and reality of classic rock, beginning as a teenager listening to the radio and collecting tapes. He winkingly likens it to the heroes journey, beginning with his adolescence and yearning to understand the music h...

    One measure of how good a book is has to be how often you pause your reading to think "I have to tell ______ about this book!, or even how often you do bring it up in conversation. This isn't the only measure, or even the best measure of how good a book is -- I can think of books that ...

    Spot on book! I'm from the era this book writes about and enjoyed the read. Some parts gave me a very hearty laugh (Hyden REALLY loathes the Eagles!) And, of course, off stage antics were a good reminisce! In light of all the accusations of sexual misconduct in the news of late, I wond...

    I was slightly disappointed in this book - but only because the bar was set so high by his previous book Your Favorite Band is Killing Me, which just had a tighter premise. That book's "[x] band vs [y] band" structure allowed Hyden to explore dichotomies in a way that was open ended an...

    When I saw this book was coming out, I knew I wanted to read it when it came out. I got it when I saw it was, in audio format, and checked it out. At first, it seemed good. It talked about a lot of bands that I enjoy, but eventually, it became clear this was more of an autobiography or...

    Hyden writes that he started this book in January 2016, around the time of the death of David Bowie and completed it around October 2017 around the time of the death of Tom Petty. Hyden?s book pays tribute to and laments the passing of these and other classic rock greats. I enjoyed t...

  • Tim Niland
    May 20, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...

    Not so qualified snippets/ ramblings on classic rock; I had so many issues with this book, I had to finish it to get to my review of the book. Here is what makes it NOT worth a read: - no common thread running through the book to connect the various snippets and back-stories about cla...

    I was never really sure where the author was going with this book. At times the book feels like a compact history of Classic Rock, but it isn't that. What it is is a road trip through the Classic Rock landscape with stops at about fifty of Classic Rock's roadside shrines (some more mea...

    What Chuck Klosterman does for hair metal in Fargo Rock City, Twilight of the Gods does for classic rock. Hyden's book, like Klosterman's, is part journalistic take on a musical genre and part memoir exploring the author's experiences with and nostalgia for that music. The book is fill...

    I have so many thoughts about this book, that I doubt I'll be able to get them all out in a cohesive manner, but needless to say I enjoyed it. The exploration of classic rock through its history, sociology, and mythology from the perspective of both fan and critic is extraordinarily we...

    I've always liked Hyden as a writer, so no surprise I'm down with the individual essays here. He knows popular music and writes about it with a lightly wry attitude. Picks of the bunch: "My Love Will Not Let You Down" (on Springsteen with a brief detour on Petty) and, even though much ...

    How much you enjoy it may hinge on whether you agree with some of its premises (I can't get behind the idea that the Classic Rock-era existed into the 90s, let alone that Nine Inch Nails' The Fragile was "the last classic rock" album(!)), but I thought its viewpoints were interesting a...

    Just wonderful. From growing up with classic rock as back ground music to running errands with my mom in our station wagon to all the years hence, this music is a part of me. I loved this book from start to finish. ...

    Hey hey, my my... Rock and roll will probably die It doesn't matter if you burn out or fade away Because we all die, oh yeah Neil Young once said something like that? Steven Hyden isn't the first person to notice the curious fascination classic rock has with time and death. But...

    Very enjoyable. (But isn't Hyden a little bit the bobo Rob Sheffield? I mean, doesn't Sheffield just do the music memoir/history perfectly? Do we NEED another Rob Sheffield? I don't imagine so; I won't be re-reading this one, and I've read all of Sheffield's books more than once. So......

    Summary: Part personal, part historical, Steven Hyden discusses the past, present, and future of "classic rock." Broadly speaking, the book covers a period between the 1960s and today. Pros: - The author masterfully weaves together his own history with that of classic rock. He a...

    3.5 stars. Hyden?s swan song to classic rock is a fun, light read for people just like Hyden: late Gen Xer/early Millennial white guys who grew up listening to classic rock radio in the 90s -- not old enough to see most classic rock musicians in their prime, but just in time to catch...

    I was suspicious of this book. I read Chuck Klosterman's Fargo Rock City years ago, and I remember feeling underwhelmed. That book felt like some dude trying to convince not just us, but himself, of why he likes the music he liked when he was wrong up. Plus, you know how Klosterman is ...

    Hyden lays out his love for classic rock, which he defines as beginning with SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND (he thinks A HARD DAY'S NIGHT was a much better album, and I agree) and ending with Nine Inch Nails' 1999 THE FRAGILE, in a book that understands the aesthetic and demogra...

    I?ve gotten a little behind the eight-ball in my reviewing, so my apologies to everyone (the author of this book being reviewed included) for being late on this five-star book. Twilight of the Gods is essentially an essential survey of classic rock and poses the question, is classic ...

    From the very moment I received Twilight of The Gods in the mail, I was hooked. I looked at this book as a look back at the music of my youth. Although Steven Hyden and I liked different bands and artist of CLASSIC ROCK, we both still love the genre. I was more into southern rock and...

    You kids don?t know Grand Funk? The wild shirtless lyrics of Mark Farner? The bong-rattling bass of Mel Schacher? The competent drumwork of Don Brewer? Steve Hyden examines what classic rock means in 2018, now that the music world is completely different, the culture is pretty dif...

    Hyden presents an entertaining look at his journey through the mythology and reality of classic rock, beginning as a teenager listening to the radio and collecting tapes. He winkingly likens it to the heroes journey, beginning with his adolescence and yearning to understand the music h...

  • Donkey21
    Jul 12, 2018

    Twilight of the Gods by Steven Hyden is a 2018 Dey Street Books publication. Sex, Drugs, and Rock -n- Roll ? This is yet another of a spate of recently released books, lamenting the death of rock music, seeming to finally admit and accept, that the rock icons still living are ...

    I know literally nothing about classic rock - I learned about Altamont by reading this book - but Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is the new religion of my household, so I figured I would dive in. Steven Hyden's Theory of the Album is this: YouTube and Napster demystified music and ...

    Twilight of the Gods is an awesome read from cover to cover. Definitely enjoyed pretty much every page and will read it again down the road. This book is an ode to the art for, known as classic rock and a must read for anyone who grew up before the advent of Napster and Spotify changed...

    That critical period from about age 10 to about age 20 imprints you to the pop culture and tells you the way the world works. It is not for nothing that Napoleon said: "you can tell a lot about a (wo)man by what the world was like when (s)he was 20." The classic rock gods who filled th...

    To put "Twilight of the Gods" in a perspective that Steven Hyden would appreciate: it is the "Goat's Head Soup" of rock books. Let me explain. If you have an interest in "Twilight of the Gods," you are undoubtedly familiar with the Rolling Stones' "Goats Head Soup". "Goats Head Soup...

    3.5* A lot of great stuff, that I really connected with, but also a fair amount that I didn't - mainly, because of the bands covered. When it was a band I was familiar with, I was all-in; when I wasn't familiar with the band, or not a fan of their work, then my attention drifted. Also...

    The main takeaway from Steven Hyden?s fantastic and much-deserved meditation of classic rock is that the mythology of what constitutes classic rock is greater than its sad and sordid truth. As our heroes have either departed this mortal coil (Bowie, Prince, Tom Petty, Leonard Cohen, ...

    Read this very quickly and liked it a lot. Hyden tackles all the classic rock mythology of performers like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Springsteen and Tom Petty. The tone is not mournful, more wistful. Hyden is a very fluid writer and he writes bothe entertainingly and with insight. ...