The Water Cure

The Water Cure

Imagine a world very close to our own: where women are not safe in their bodies, where desperate measures are required to raise a daughter. This is the story of Grace, Lia, and Sky kept apart from the world for their own good and taught the terrible things that every woman must learn about love. And it is the story of the men who come to find them - three strangers washed Imagine a world very close to our own: where women are not safe in their bodies, where desperate measures are required to ...

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Title:The Water Cure
Author:Sophie Mackintosh
Rating:
Genres:Fiction
ISBN:The Water Cure
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:256 pages pages

The Water Cure Reviews

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    Aug 06, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

  • Sara
    Feb 25, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

    I can't decide if this is a simply a cautionary tale against men, against the destruction of our natural habitats, or against society as a whole. There is a power struggle between the parents and three sisters. Even after the "death" of the father, he still played a prominent role in t...

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Water Cure tells the story of three sisters; Lia, Grace and Sky as they live a reclusive island life with Mother and the 'King'. Here they learn that the outside world will harm them, although what that is never k...

  • David
    Sep 07, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

    I can't decide if this is a simply a cautionary tale against men, against the destruction of our natural habitats, or against society as a whole. There is a power struggle between the parents and three sisters. Even after the "death" of the father, he still played a prominent role in t...

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Water Cure tells the story of three sisters; Lia, Grace and Sky as they live a reclusive island life with Mother and the 'King'. Here they learn that the outside world will harm them, although what that is never k...

    Part of me has always felt a simmering sense of panic, that some unknown danger or threat could be lurking around every corner. Fear can be such a powerful impetus in our lives both for motivating us to keep ourselves safe and hindering us from fully engaging with the world. It feels e...

    The first word of The Water Cure may be ?Once,? but what follows is no fairy tale. Here?s the rest of that sentence: ?Once we have a father, but our father dies without us noticing.? The tense seems all wrong; surely it should be ?had? and ?died?? From the very first ...

    --- This review contains spoilers --- --- Trigger warnings: violence, physical and mental abuse --- 3.5 stars. The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh is the story of three sisters who are all teenagers or young adults. Lia is the main narrative voice taking up all of the middle p...

    "We sisters have always been cruel in our own way, but I believe our cruelty is allowable. It kept us alive, it helps us to put things right." Grace, Lia, and Sky live with their parents in a house beside a sandy beach. That sounds like the beginning of a wonderful story, doesn't it...

    I feel like this week is conspiring against me reads-wise. The pitch for THE WATER CURE was THE HANDMAID'S TALE meets THE VIRGIN SUICIDES in this dystopic feminist revenge fantasy about three sisters on an isolated island, raised to fear men and while that concept drew me in.. I thi...

    Mackintosh writes in absolutely beautiful and unflinching prose about the desolation and destruction of a family. The book is set in a remote, seaside home of a family of a father (King), a mother (Mother), and three sisters (Lia, Grace, and Sky). The sisters are raised in isolatio...

    ?The Water Cure,? Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, was released earlier this month, and I knew I should read it. It was long-listed for the Man Booker, so I just had to give it a shot. The novel focuses on three sisters (Grace, Lia, and Sky) who live on an island with their mothe...

    My personal take on The Water Cure is somewhat different to the explanations given in interview by the author, Sophie Mackintosh. I guess I am out of kilter. I thought the book had lots to offer, and to contemplate, and I can understand its selection for the Man Booker Prize long li...

    "The Water Cure" is unpleasant, disturbing, and diffuse. Early on I chose to compartmentalize my own emotional response, embrace the ambiguity, and approach the story with an analytic mindset. It was the only way to get through it. Triggers for readers include child abuse (physical, me...

  • Jenna
    Feb 13, 2019

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

  • Rachel
    Dec 15, 2017

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

  • Trudie
    Jul 27, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

  • Ova - Excuse My Reading
    Aug 28, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

  • Rebecca
    Sep 01, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

    I can't decide if this is a simply a cautionary tale against men, against the destruction of our natural habitats, or against society as a whole. There is a power struggle between the parents and three sisters. Even after the "death" of the father, he still played a prominent role in t...

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Water Cure tells the story of three sisters; Lia, Grace and Sky as they live a reclusive island life with Mother and the 'King'. Here they learn that the outside world will harm them, although what that is never k...

    Part of me has always felt a simmering sense of panic, that some unknown danger or threat could be lurking around every corner. Fear can be such a powerful impetus in our lives both for motivating us to keep ourselves safe and hindering us from fully engaging with the world. It feels e...

    The first word of The Water Cure may be ?Once,? but what follows is no fairy tale. Here?s the rest of that sentence: ?Once we have a father, but our father dies without us noticing.? The tense seems all wrong; surely it should be ?had? and ?died?? From the very first ...

  • Claire
    Sep 08, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

  • David
    Jan 20, 2019

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

    I can't decide if this is a simply a cautionary tale against men, against the destruction of our natural habitats, or against society as a whole. There is a power struggle between the parents and three sisters. Even after the "death" of the father, he still played a prominent role in t...

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Water Cure tells the story of three sisters; Lia, Grace and Sky as they live a reclusive island life with Mother and the 'King'. Here they learn that the outside world will harm them, although what that is never k...

    Part of me has always felt a simmering sense of panic, that some unknown danger or threat could be lurking around every corner. Fear can be such a powerful impetus in our lives both for motivating us to keep ourselves safe and hindering us from fully engaging with the world. It feels e...

    The first word of The Water Cure may be ?Once,? but what follows is no fairy tale. Here?s the rest of that sentence: ?Once we have a father, but our father dies without us noticing.? The tense seems all wrong; surely it should be ?had? and ?died?? From the very first ...

    --- This review contains spoilers --- --- Trigger warnings: violence, physical and mental abuse --- 3.5 stars. The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh is the story of three sisters who are all teenagers or young adults. Lia is the main narrative voice taking up all of the middle p...

    "We sisters have always been cruel in our own way, but I believe our cruelty is allowable. It kept us alive, it helps us to put things right." Grace, Lia, and Sky live with their parents in a house beside a sandy beach. That sounds like the beginning of a wonderful story, doesn't it...

    I feel like this week is conspiring against me reads-wise. The pitch for THE WATER CURE was THE HANDMAID'S TALE meets THE VIRGIN SUICIDES in this dystopic feminist revenge fantasy about three sisters on an isolated island, raised to fear men and while that concept drew me in.. I thi...

    Mackintosh writes in absolutely beautiful and unflinching prose about the desolation and destruction of a family. The book is set in a remote, seaside home of a family of a father (King), a mother (Mother), and three sisters (Lia, Grace, and Sky). The sisters are raised in isolatio...

    ?The Water Cure,? Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, was released earlier this month, and I knew I should read it. It was long-listed for the Man Booker, so I just had to give it a shot. The novel focuses on three sisters (Grace, Lia, and Sky) who live on an island with their mothe...

  • Marchpane
    Aug 05, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

  • Monica
    Nov 05, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

    I can't decide if this is a simply a cautionary tale against men, against the destruction of our natural habitats, or against society as a whole. There is a power struggle between the parents and three sisters. Even after the "death" of the father, he still played a prominent role in t...

  • Bex (Beckie Bookworm)
    Jul 31, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

  • Melanie  (Perpetually Reading)
    May 31, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

    I can't decide if this is a simply a cautionary tale against men, against the destruction of our natural habitats, or against society as a whole. There is a power struggle between the parents and three sisters. Even after the "death" of the father, he still played a prominent role in t...

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Water Cure tells the story of three sisters; Lia, Grace and Sky as they live a reclusive island life with Mother and the 'King'. Here they learn that the outside world will harm them, although what that is never k...

    Part of me has always felt a simmering sense of panic, that some unknown danger or threat could be lurking around every corner. Fear can be such a powerful impetus in our lives both for motivating us to keep ourselves safe and hindering us from fully engaging with the world. It feels e...

    The first word of The Water Cure may be ?Once,? but what follows is no fairy tale. Here?s the rest of that sentence: ?Once we have a father, but our father dies without us noticing.? The tense seems all wrong; surely it should be ?had? and ?died?? From the very first ...

    --- This review contains spoilers --- --- Trigger warnings: violence, physical and mental abuse --- 3.5 stars. The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh is the story of three sisters who are all teenagers or young adults. Lia is the main narrative voice taking up all of the middle p...

    "We sisters have always been cruel in our own way, but I believe our cruelty is allowable. It kept us alive, it helps us to put things right." Grace, Lia, and Sky live with their parents in a house beside a sandy beach. That sounds like the beginning of a wonderful story, doesn't it...

    I feel like this week is conspiring against me reads-wise. The pitch for THE WATER CURE was THE HANDMAID'S TALE meets THE VIRGIN SUICIDES in this dystopic feminist revenge fantasy about three sisters on an isolated island, raised to fear men and while that concept drew me in.. I thi...

    Mackintosh writes in absolutely beautiful and unflinching prose about the desolation and destruction of a family. The book is set in a remote, seaside home of a family of a father (King), a mother (Mother), and three sisters (Lia, Grace, and Sky). The sisters are raised in isolatio...

  • Hollis
    Mar 28, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

    I can't decide if this is a simply a cautionary tale against men, against the destruction of our natural habitats, or against society as a whole. There is a power struggle between the parents and three sisters. Even after the "death" of the father, he still played a prominent role in t...

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Water Cure tells the story of three sisters; Lia, Grace and Sky as they live a reclusive island life with Mother and the 'King'. Here they learn that the outside world will harm them, although what that is never k...

    Part of me has always felt a simmering sense of panic, that some unknown danger or threat could be lurking around every corner. Fear can be such a powerful impetus in our lives both for motivating us to keep ourselves safe and hindering us from fully engaging with the world. It feels e...

    The first word of The Water Cure may be ?Once,? but what follows is no fairy tale. Here?s the rest of that sentence: ?Once we have a father, but our father dies without us noticing.? The tense seems all wrong; surely it should be ?had? and ?died?? From the very first ...

    --- This review contains spoilers --- --- Trigger warnings: violence, physical and mental abuse --- 3.5 stars. The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh is the story of three sisters who are all teenagers or young adults. Lia is the main narrative voice taking up all of the middle p...

    "We sisters have always been cruel in our own way, but I believe our cruelty is allowable. It kept us alive, it helps us to put things right." Grace, Lia, and Sky live with their parents in a house beside a sandy beach. That sounds like the beginning of a wonderful story, doesn't it...

    I feel like this week is conspiring against me reads-wise. The pitch for THE WATER CURE was THE HANDMAID'S TALE meets THE VIRGIN SUICIDES in this dystopic feminist revenge fantasy about three sisters on an isolated island, raised to fear men and while that concept drew me in.. I thi...

  • Amanda
    Sep 12, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

  • Tim
    Jul 28, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

    I can't decide if this is a simply a cautionary tale against men, against the destruction of our natural habitats, or against society as a whole. There is a power struggle between the parents and three sisters. Even after the "death" of the father, he still played a prominent role in t...

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Water Cure tells the story of three sisters; Lia, Grace and Sky as they live a reclusive island life with Mother and the 'King'. Here they learn that the outside world will harm them, although what that is never k...

    Part of me has always felt a simmering sense of panic, that some unknown danger or threat could be lurking around every corner. Fear can be such a powerful impetus in our lives both for motivating us to keep ourselves safe and hindering us from fully engaging with the world. It feels e...

    The first word of The Water Cure may be ?Once,? but what follows is no fairy tale. Here?s the rest of that sentence: ?Once we have a father, but our father dies without us noticing.? The tense seems all wrong; surely it should be ?had? and ?died?? From the very first ...

    --- This review contains spoilers --- --- Trigger warnings: violence, physical and mental abuse --- 3.5 stars. The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh is the story of three sisters who are all teenagers or young adults. Lia is the main narrative voice taking up all of the middle p...

  • Umut Reviews
    Aug 06, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

  • Tiffany PSquared
    Jun 22, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

    I can't decide if this is a simply a cautionary tale against men, against the destruction of our natural habitats, or against society as a whole. There is a power struggle between the parents and three sisters. Even after the "death" of the father, he still played a prominent role in t...

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Water Cure tells the story of three sisters; Lia, Grace and Sky as they live a reclusive island life with Mother and the 'King'. Here they learn that the outside world will harm them, although what that is never k...

    Part of me has always felt a simmering sense of panic, that some unknown danger or threat could be lurking around every corner. Fear can be such a powerful impetus in our lives both for motivating us to keep ourselves safe and hindering us from fully engaging with the world. It feels e...

    The first word of The Water Cure may be ?Once,? but what follows is no fairy tale. Here?s the rest of that sentence: ?Once we have a father, but our father dies without us noticing.? The tense seems all wrong; surely it should be ?had? and ?died?? From the very first ...

    --- This review contains spoilers --- --- Trigger warnings: violence, physical and mental abuse --- 3.5 stars. The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh is the story of three sisters who are all teenagers or young adults. Lia is the main narrative voice taking up all of the middle p...

    "We sisters have always been cruel in our own way, but I believe our cruelty is allowable. It kept us alive, it helps us to put things right." Grace, Lia, and Sky live with their parents in a house beside a sandy beach. That sounds like the beginning of a wonderful story, doesn't it...

  • Jonathan Pool
    Jul 29, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

    I can't decide if this is a simply a cautionary tale against men, against the destruction of our natural habitats, or against society as a whole. There is a power struggle between the parents and three sisters. Even after the "death" of the father, he still played a prominent role in t...

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Water Cure tells the story of three sisters; Lia, Grace and Sky as they live a reclusive island life with Mother and the 'King'. Here they learn that the outside world will harm them, although what that is never k...

    Part of me has always felt a simmering sense of panic, that some unknown danger or threat could be lurking around every corner. Fear can be such a powerful impetus in our lives both for motivating us to keep ourselves safe and hindering us from fully engaging with the world. It feels e...

    The first word of The Water Cure may be ?Once,? but what follows is no fairy tale. Here?s the rest of that sentence: ?Once we have a father, but our father dies without us noticing.? The tense seems all wrong; surely it should be ?had? and ?died?? From the very first ...

    --- This review contains spoilers --- --- Trigger warnings: violence, physical and mental abuse --- 3.5 stars. The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh is the story of three sisters who are all teenagers or young adults. Lia is the main narrative voice taking up all of the middle p...

    "We sisters have always been cruel in our own way, but I believe our cruelty is allowable. It kept us alive, it helps us to put things right." Grace, Lia, and Sky live with their parents in a house beside a sandy beach. That sounds like the beginning of a wonderful story, doesn't it...

    I feel like this week is conspiring against me reads-wise. The pitch for THE WATER CURE was THE HANDMAID'S TALE meets THE VIRGIN SUICIDES in this dystopic feminist revenge fantasy about three sisters on an isolated island, raised to fear men and while that concept drew me in.. I thi...

    Mackintosh writes in absolutely beautiful and unflinching prose about the desolation and destruction of a family. The book is set in a remote, seaside home of a family of a father (King), a mother (Mother), and three sisters (Lia, Grace, and Sky). The sisters are raised in isolatio...

    ?The Water Cure,? Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, was released earlier this month, and I knew I should read it. It was long-listed for the Man Booker, so I just had to give it a shot. The novel focuses on three sisters (Grace, Lia, and Sky) who live on an island with their mothe...

    My personal take on The Water Cure is somewhat different to the explanations given in interview by the author, Sophie Mackintosh. I guess I am out of kilter. I thought the book had lots to offer, and to contemplate, and I can understand its selection for the Man Booker Prize long li...

  • Eric Anderson
    Jul 18, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

    I can't decide if this is a simply a cautionary tale against men, against the destruction of our natural habitats, or against society as a whole. There is a power struggle between the parents and three sisters. Even after the "death" of the father, he still played a prominent role in t...

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Water Cure tells the story of three sisters; Lia, Grace and Sky as they live a reclusive island life with Mother and the 'King'. Here they learn that the outside world will harm them, although what that is never k...

    Part of me has always felt a simmering sense of panic, that some unknown danger or threat could be lurking around every corner. Fear can be such a powerful impetus in our lives both for motivating us to keep ourselves safe and hindering us from fully engaging with the world. It feels e...

  • Hugh
    Jul 24, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

  • Gumble's Yard
    Jul 23, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

  • Britta Böhler
    Jul 24, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

  • Hannah
    May 10, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

  • Hannah Greendale
    Aug 18, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

  • Dannii Elle
    Jul 16, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

  • Navidad Thélamour
    Dec 25, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

  • Lucy Banks
    Feb 15, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...

    This book. It is so very difficult to describe this book, which is I think one of the reasons why the blurb is so vague. This is the story of three sisters, growing up on an island with their parents where something is obviously not quite right but many things remain vague for the w...

    All the monsters in this book are women. ...

    The Water Cure is the first book I selected to read from the recently released 2018 Booker longlist. I chose this one simply as it ended up being the first one I came across in the local bookshop. I went into this blind not even aware it was a "female dystopia". The writing is initi...

    Sudden love, when gifted to a habitually unloved person, can induce nausea. It can become a thing you would claw and debase yourself for. It is necessary to wean yourself onto it, small portions. Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, The Water Cure, is the story of three sisters livin...

    I'm a bit tired of publicists (and/or reviewers) telling me that a certain book is the 21st century's version of The Handmaid's Tale, and also of the fact that feminist dystopian novels are so hip and hyped at the moment. I read quite a few of them, some good, like Red Clocks by Leni Z...

    For full review, please visit my blog: https://umutreviews.wordpress.com/201... 2.5 stars. I haven?t read such a weird novel since long time. I read the reviews and there are lovers and there are people who dislike it a lot. I think I can say, it wasn?t a pleasant read that blew...

    In this debut novel, three daughters live in seclusion from the world because their parents have told them that men are evil and somehow also ? literally ? toxic. The ?dystopian? premise is just a pretext for their isolation, because what The Water Cure is really concerned w...

    This is a dystopian unlike any other I have read before. The world reaches to the very horizon and yet is contained to the interior of one house. The landscape is sparse on concrete detail yet the feel of the forest ferns or the gentle pull and release of the tides is portrayed in star...

    It takes a gifted author to write a book that is simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. I don't think I could have read this book if it wasn't written so exquisitely; the words flow and submerse you in their eloquent beauty. And yet. And yet, the story is disturbing. It is not fo...

    Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2018 My fifth book from this year's longlist and the first one I find it difficult to be very positive about. Dystopian fantasy has never been my favourite genre, so I don't want to be too negative either. The plot centres on a family living i...

    The writing in this book, and the way the author is able to describe the somewhat strange setting, is stellar. In the Man Booker Prize longlist wasteland that is 2018, I found it one of the more compelling reads. I love the little backstory italic parts between chapters, the ending and...

    This was a very intense book- and the most confusing novels I have ever read this year. The start of it made me feel like I am reading about being damaged by a man, being left, loveless. You know when you get heart ache you feel your family is the one and only place you can get unco...

    The Water Cure was nothing like I expected, but I ended up enjoying it all the more for that. This is a vaguely unsettling, eerie tale of three sisters who were raised by their parents on a remote island to fear all men other than their father. They believe the outside world is dangero...

    I have to start this review by acknowledging that The Water Cure is definitely a polarising book- it?s not one that is going to be for everyone. That being said, Mackintosh hit a few of the things I find most engaging as a reader. I?ve seen this described a feminist novel, and a...

    This book was different from my usual read and that?s why I wanted to read it. Sometimes I find myself drawn to the same types of books so by reading this I was leaving my comfort zone. The story of a father called King and his wife bringing up his 3 children on an Island away fro...

    2 Stars Arc Book Review Release Date-24/5/18 This one really wasn't for me at all and originally I did stop at 39% and it was going to be a DNF. But I decided to persevere and forced myself to finish. Hoping it would get better. I?m sorry to say for me it didn?t. So a...

    Once we [three sisters] have a father, but our father dies without us noticing. As a father of three daughters this probably counts as the personally most arresting opening sentence I have read in this novel which I had already ordered but went to the top of my reading pile after ...

    I can't decide if this is a simply a cautionary tale against men, against the destruction of our natural habitats, or against society as a whole. There is a power struggle between the parents and three sisters. Even after the "death" of the father, he still played a prominent role in t...

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Water Cure tells the story of three sisters; Lia, Grace and Sky as they live a reclusive island life with Mother and the 'King'. Here they learn that the outside world will harm them, although what that is never k...

    Part of me has always felt a simmering sense of panic, that some unknown danger or threat could be lurking around every corner. Fear can be such a powerful impetus in our lives both for motivating us to keep ourselves safe and hindering us from fully engaging with the world. It feels e...

    The first word of The Water Cure may be ?Once,? but what follows is no fairy tale. Here?s the rest of that sentence: ?Once we have a father, but our father dies without us noticing.? The tense seems all wrong; surely it should be ?had? and ?died?? From the very first ...

    --- This review contains spoilers --- --- Trigger warnings: violence, physical and mental abuse --- 3.5 stars. The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh is the story of three sisters who are all teenagers or young adults. Lia is the main narrative voice taking up all of the middle p...

    "We sisters have always been cruel in our own way, but I believe our cruelty is allowable. It kept us alive, it helps us to put things right." Grace, Lia, and Sky live with their parents in a house beside a sandy beach. That sounds like the beginning of a wonderful story, doesn't it...

    I feel like this week is conspiring against me reads-wise. The pitch for THE WATER CURE was THE HANDMAID'S TALE meets THE VIRGIN SUICIDES in this dystopic feminist revenge fantasy about three sisters on an isolated island, raised to fear men and while that concept drew me in.. I thi...

    Mackintosh writes in absolutely beautiful and unflinching prose about the desolation and destruction of a family. The book is set in a remote, seaside home of a family of a father (King), a mother (Mother), and three sisters (Lia, Grace, and Sky). The sisters are raised in isolatio...

    ?The Water Cure,? Sophie Mackintosh?s debut novel, was released earlier this month, and I knew I should read it. It was long-listed for the Man Booker, so I just had to give it a shot. The novel focuses on three sisters (Grace, Lia, and Sky) who live on an island with their mothe...

    My personal take on The Water Cure is somewhat different to the explanations given in interview by the author, Sophie Mackintosh. I guess I am out of kilter. I thought the book had lots to offer, and to contemplate, and I can understand its selection for the Man Booker Prize long li...

    "The Water Cure" is unpleasant, disturbing, and diffuse. Early on I chose to compartmentalize my own emotional response, embrace the ambiguity, and approach the story with an analytic mindset. It was the only way to get through it. Triggers for readers include child abuse (physical, me...

    I received a copy of this book from Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review. Elusive, haunting - expertly crafted, but slightly too hard to grasp in places. I always appreciate authors who dare to try something different - and The Water Cure certainly falls into that category...

  • Meike
    Jul 23, 2018

    Of course you can slap the label "feminist dystopia" on a book in order to sell more copies, alas, it doesn't make the book a feminist dystopia. Mackintosh's writing is languid and evocative, but there is nothing below the surface - no one will drown in the depths of this story. In...