What Is Real?: The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics

What Is Real?: The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics

The untold story of the heretical thinkers who dared to question the nature of our quantum universe Every physicist agrees quantum mechanics is among humanity's finest scientific achievements. But ask what it means, and the result will be a brawl. For a century, most physicists have followed Niels Bohr's Copenhagen interpretation and dismissed questions about the reality un The untold story of the heretical thinkers who dared to question the nature of our quantum universe Every physicist ag...

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Title:What Is Real?: The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics
Author:Adam Becker
Rating:
Genres:Science
ISBN:What is Real?: The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:384 pages pages

What Is Real?: The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics Reviews

  • Ari
    Mar 27, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

  • Ramin
    Mar 27, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

  • Jim Coughenour
    Jun 06, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

  • Todd
    Apr 03, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

    This book is so redundant. Could relate all the details in half the pages if things were not repeated so many times. ...

    Personally, I take it as a right book at right time. Comprehensive enough, it deals with intertwined ideas which have originated in the field of quantum physics, their mutual influence, evolution and collisions. All in a neatly presented landscape of personalities, institutions, trends...

    I walked up to what i thought was the ice cream counter and got a calzone. Nothing wrong with a calzone, but if the sign and menu say ice cream, even the best calzone is disappointing. I thought this was about the nature of reality and was bored more often than not until the last 2...

    A book for anyone interested in the intersection between physics, philosophy, and history. You don't have to study quantum mechanics to understand this book, but after reading it, you will surely want to. ...

    The first third and the appendix were fantastic. The author adroitly takes complex science concepts and explains them in a very readable fashion. The second two thirds of the book, however, devolved into name soup. I wish this book would have been more science and less history. ...

    An entertaining and interesting overview of some of the issues surrounding the interpretation of quantum mechanics. The author has a strong opinion that the Copenhagen interpretation (to the extent that such a thing exists) involving wavefunction collapse is bankrupt, although he's not...

    Copenhagen, many-worlds, pilot waves, spontaneous collapse, non-localism, hidden variables, falsifiability, logical positivism, Bell's Theorem, the EPR paper, cosmological constant,...These ideas and the people behind them make up Adam Becker's wonderful account of quantum physics. Lik...

  • Ed Erwin
    Apr 13, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

  • Manny
    Jul 09, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

  • Terry
    Jul 10, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

  • metralindol
    Aug 28, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

    This book is so redundant. Could relate all the details in half the pages if things were not repeated so many times. ...

    Personally, I take it as a right book at right time. Comprehensive enough, it deals with intertwined ideas which have originated in the field of quantum physics, their mutual influence, evolution and collisions. All in a neatly presented landscape of personalities, institutions, trends...

  • Odo
    Jul 02, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

  • Michael Flick
    Apr 19, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

  • Jon
    Jul 15, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

    This book is so redundant. Could relate all the details in half the pages if things were not repeated so many times. ...

    Personally, I take it as a right book at right time. Comprehensive enough, it deals with intertwined ideas which have originated in the field of quantum physics, their mutual influence, evolution and collisions. All in a neatly presented landscape of personalities, institutions, trends...

    I walked up to what i thought was the ice cream counter and got a calzone. Nothing wrong with a calzone, but if the sign and menu say ice cream, even the best calzone is disappointing. I thought this was about the nature of reality and was bored more often than not until the last 2...

  • Paperclippe
    May 07, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

  • Jason Furman
    May 10, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

  • Carl
    Aug 23, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

    This book is so redundant. Could relate all the details in half the pages if things were not repeated so many times. ...

    Personally, I take it as a right book at right time. Comprehensive enough, it deals with intertwined ideas which have originated in the field of quantum physics, their mutual influence, evolution and collisions. All in a neatly presented landscape of personalities, institutions, trends...

    I walked up to what i thought was the ice cream counter and got a calzone. Nothing wrong with a calzone, but if the sign and menu say ice cream, even the best calzone is disappointing. I thought this was about the nature of reality and was bored more often than not until the last 2...

    A book for anyone interested in the intersection between physics, philosophy, and history. You don't have to study quantum mechanics to understand this book, but after reading it, you will surely want to. ...

    The first third and the appendix were fantastic. The author adroitly takes complex science concepts and explains them in a very readable fashion. The second two thirds of the book, however, devolved into name soup. I wish this book would have been more science and less history. ...

    An entertaining and interesting overview of some of the issues surrounding the interpretation of quantum mechanics. The author has a strong opinion that the Copenhagen interpretation (to the extent that such a thing exists) involving wavefunction collapse is bankrupt, although he's not...

    Copenhagen, many-worlds, pilot waves, spontaneous collapse, non-localism, hidden variables, falsifiability, logical positivism, Bell's Theorem, the EPR paper, cosmological constant,...These ideas and the people behind them make up Adam Becker's wonderful account of quantum physics. Lik...

    Overall I thought this was an excellent history of the foundations and growing up of quantum theory as well as how the biases of large figures in the field have had vast impact on the way that quantum theory is taught and thought of today. As mathematics is not used in this book there ...

    ***SPOILER ALERT*** Becker's answer to the question posed in the title is: "I don't know" (287). That's the book in a nutshell. After more than 100 years of puzzling over the microscopic realm, reality is still open to interpretation. While most physicists can't admit this fundamental ...

    If you were wondering how Schrödinger?s cat was doing, or in other words, current thinking on the interpretation of quantum physics, this is a good book to read. Quantum physics is a theory of the subatomic world whose calculations have had an enormous impact on our world, from c...

  • Abner Rosenweig
    Sep 11, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

    This book is so redundant. Could relate all the details in half the pages if things were not repeated so many times. ...

    Personally, I take it as a right book at right time. Comprehensive enough, it deals with intertwined ideas which have originated in the field of quantum physics, their mutual influence, evolution and collisions. All in a neatly presented landscape of personalities, institutions, trends...

    I walked up to what i thought was the ice cream counter and got a calzone. Nothing wrong with a calzone, but if the sign and menu say ice cream, even the best calzone is disappointing. I thought this was about the nature of reality and was bored more often than not until the last 2...

    A book for anyone interested in the intersection between physics, philosophy, and history. You don't have to study quantum mechanics to understand this book, but after reading it, you will surely want to. ...

    The first third and the appendix were fantastic. The author adroitly takes complex science concepts and explains them in a very readable fashion. The second two thirds of the book, however, devolved into name soup. I wish this book would have been more science and less history. ...

    An entertaining and interesting overview of some of the issues surrounding the interpretation of quantum mechanics. The author has a strong opinion that the Copenhagen interpretation (to the extent that such a thing exists) involving wavefunction collapse is bankrupt, although he's not...

    Copenhagen, many-worlds, pilot waves, spontaneous collapse, non-localism, hidden variables, falsifiability, logical positivism, Bell's Theorem, the EPR paper, cosmological constant,...These ideas and the people behind them make up Adam Becker's wonderful account of quantum physics. Lik...

    Overall I thought this was an excellent history of the foundations and growing up of quantum theory as well as how the biases of large figures in the field have had vast impact on the way that quantum theory is taught and thought of today. As mathematics is not used in this book there ...

    ***SPOILER ALERT*** Becker's answer to the question posed in the title is: "I don't know" (287). That's the book in a nutshell. After more than 100 years of puzzling over the microscopic realm, reality is still open to interpretation. While most physicists can't admit this fundamental ...

  • St Fu
    Sep 01, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

    This book is so redundant. Could relate all the details in half the pages if things were not repeated so many times. ...

    Personally, I take it as a right book at right time. Comprehensive enough, it deals with intertwined ideas which have originated in the field of quantum physics, their mutual influence, evolution and collisions. All in a neatly presented landscape of personalities, institutions, trends...

    I walked up to what i thought was the ice cream counter and got a calzone. Nothing wrong with a calzone, but if the sign and menu say ice cream, even the best calzone is disappointing. I thought this was about the nature of reality and was bored more often than not until the last 2...

    A book for anyone interested in the intersection between physics, philosophy, and history. You don't have to study quantum mechanics to understand this book, but after reading it, you will surely want to. ...

    The first third and the appendix were fantastic. The author adroitly takes complex science concepts and explains them in a very readable fashion. The second two thirds of the book, however, devolved into name soup. I wish this book would have been more science and less history. ...

    An entertaining and interesting overview of some of the issues surrounding the interpretation of quantum mechanics. The author has a strong opinion that the Copenhagen interpretation (to the extent that such a thing exists) involving wavefunction collapse is bankrupt, although he's not...

    Copenhagen, many-worlds, pilot waves, spontaneous collapse, non-localism, hidden variables, falsifiability, logical positivism, Bell's Theorem, the EPR paper, cosmological constant,...These ideas and the people behind them make up Adam Becker's wonderful account of quantum physics. Lik...

    Overall I thought this was an excellent history of the foundations and growing up of quantum theory as well as how the biases of large figures in the field have had vast impact on the way that quantum theory is taught and thought of today. As mathematics is not used in this book there ...

    ***SPOILER ALERT*** Becker's answer to the question posed in the title is: "I don't know" (287). That's the book in a nutshell. After more than 100 years of puzzling over the microscopic realm, reality is still open to interpretation. While most physicists can't admit this fundamental ...

    If you were wondering how Schrödinger?s cat was doing, or in other words, current thinking on the interpretation of quantum physics, this is a good book to read. Quantum physics is a theory of the subatomic world whose calculations have had an enormous impact on our world, from c...

    Betteridge's law states when the headline is in the form of a question, the answer is always "No." Applying that to this book, nothing is real and nothing to get hung about. The subtitle admits that searching for the real is an unfinished quest but implies it is finishable. Indeed, our...

  • Stefan Poth
    May 22, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

    This book is so redundant. Could relate all the details in half the pages if things were not repeated so many times. ...

  • Rāhul
    Jun 21, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

  • Peter Mcloughlin
    Apr 03, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

  • Mishehu
    Jul 07, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

  • Radiantflux
    Jun 06, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

  • Manuel AntĆ£o
    May 27, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

  • Seth Benzell
    Jul 14, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

  • RebeccaReads
    Jul 15, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

    This book is so redundant. Could relate all the details in half the pages if things were not repeated so many times. ...

    Personally, I take it as a right book at right time. Comprehensive enough, it deals with intertwined ideas which have originated in the field of quantum physics, their mutual influence, evolution and collisions. All in a neatly presented landscape of personalities, institutions, trends...

    I walked up to what i thought was the ice cream counter and got a calzone. Nothing wrong with a calzone, but if the sign and menu say ice cream, even the best calzone is disappointing. I thought this was about the nature of reality and was bored more often than not until the last 2...

    A book for anyone interested in the intersection between physics, philosophy, and history. You don't have to study quantum mechanics to understand this book, but after reading it, you will surely want to. ...

    The first third and the appendix were fantastic. The author adroitly takes complex science concepts and explains them in a very readable fashion. The second two thirds of the book, however, devolved into name soup. I wish this book would have been more science and less history. ...

  • Harril Saunders
    May 25, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

    This book is so redundant. Could relate all the details in half the pages if things were not repeated so many times. ...

    Personally, I take it as a right book at right time. Comprehensive enough, it deals with intertwined ideas which have originated in the field of quantum physics, their mutual influence, evolution and collisions. All in a neatly presented landscape of personalities, institutions, trends...

    I walked up to what i thought was the ice cream counter and got a calzone. Nothing wrong with a calzone, but if the sign and menu say ice cream, even the best calzone is disappointing. I thought this was about the nature of reality and was bored more often than not until the last 2...

    A book for anyone interested in the intersection between physics, philosophy, and history. You don't have to study quantum mechanics to understand this book, but after reading it, you will surely want to. ...

  • Adam Hall
    Jun 30, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

    This book is so redundant. Could relate all the details in half the pages if things were not repeated so many times. ...

    Personally, I take it as a right book at right time. Comprehensive enough, it deals with intertwined ideas which have originated in the field of quantum physics, their mutual influence, evolution and collisions. All in a neatly presented landscape of personalities, institutions, trends...

    I walked up to what i thought was the ice cream counter and got a calzone. Nothing wrong with a calzone, but if the sign and menu say ice cream, even the best calzone is disappointing. I thought this was about the nature of reality and was bored more often than not until the last 2...

    A book for anyone interested in the intersection between physics, philosophy, and history. You don't have to study quantum mechanics to understand this book, but after reading it, you will surely want to. ...

    The first third and the appendix were fantastic. The author adroitly takes complex science concepts and explains them in a very readable fashion. The second two thirds of the book, however, devolved into name soup. I wish this book would have been more science and less history. ...

    An entertaining and interesting overview of some of the issues surrounding the interpretation of quantum mechanics. The author has a strong opinion that the Copenhagen interpretation (to the extent that such a thing exists) involving wavefunction collapse is bankrupt, although he's not...

  • Ilya
    May 28, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

  • Eric Hulburd
    May 28, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

    This book is so redundant. Could relate all the details in half the pages if things were not repeated so many times. ...

    Personally, I take it as a right book at right time. Comprehensive enough, it deals with intertwined ideas which have originated in the field of quantum physics, their mutual influence, evolution and collisions. All in a neatly presented landscape of personalities, institutions, trends...

    I walked up to what i thought was the ice cream counter and got a calzone. Nothing wrong with a calzone, but if the sign and menu say ice cream, even the best calzone is disappointing. I thought this was about the nature of reality and was bored more often than not until the last 2...

    A book for anyone interested in the intersection between physics, philosophy, and history. You don't have to study quantum mechanics to understand this book, but after reading it, you will surely want to. ...

    The first third and the appendix were fantastic. The author adroitly takes complex science concepts and explains them in a very readable fashion. The second two thirds of the book, however, devolved into name soup. I wish this book would have been more science and less history. ...

    An entertaining and interesting overview of some of the issues surrounding the interpretation of quantum mechanics. The author has a strong opinion that the Copenhagen interpretation (to the extent that such a thing exists) involving wavefunction collapse is bankrupt, although he's not...

    Copenhagen, many-worlds, pilot waves, spontaneous collapse, non-localism, hidden variables, falsifiability, logical positivism, Bell's Theorem, the EPR paper, cosmological constant,...These ideas and the people behind them make up Adam Becker's wonderful account of quantum physics. Lik...

    Overall I thought this was an excellent history of the foundations and growing up of quantum theory as well as how the biases of large figures in the field have had vast impact on the way that quantum theory is taught and thought of today. As mathematics is not used in this book there ...

    ***SPOILER ALERT*** Becker's answer to the question posed in the title is: "I don't know" (287). That's the book in a nutshell. After more than 100 years of puzzling over the microscopic realm, reality is still open to interpretation. While most physicists can't admit this fundamental ...

    If you were wondering how Schrödinger?s cat was doing, or in other words, current thinking on the interpretation of quantum physics, this is a good book to read. Quantum physics is a theory of the subatomic world whose calculations have had an enormous impact on our world, from c...

    Betteridge's law states when the headline is in the form of a question, the answer is always "No." Applying that to this book, nothing is real and nothing to get hung about. The subtitle admits that searching for the real is an unfinished quest but implies it is finishable. Indeed, our...

    Take my review from a computer/environmental engineer's perspective, not a physicist's. I thought this book was excellent. I've read a few other books on QM that really focused on the math (Leonard Susskind's was great for this). However, while understanding the math is important for a...

  • Carsten
    Aug 01, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

  • Matthew Feickert
    May 31, 2018

    What is real? This ought to be a question of burning interest to almost everyone, and yet, for some reason, hardly anybody over the age of seventeen seems to take it seriously. If you ask the adults, no one's sure whose responsibility it is. They send you over to talk to the sociol...

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Quantum Ontology: The Universal-Wave-Function vs. The Pilot-Schrödinger-Wave-Function vs. the Collapsing-Schrödinger-Wave-function as a Stab at Explaining Reality. The diversity of possible comments on this book ...

    59th book for 2018. A very interesting and accessible book on quantum ontology. With no math (!) Becker takes the reader effortlessly through nearly a hundred years of back-and-forth debate as what quantum mechanics implies about the universe we live in. The history itself is...

    Solid debate on the rise and fall of the Copenhagen interpretation and rise of its competitors like Bohmian mechanics, Many Worlds. Covers Einstein's qualms of around the probabilities and the EPR thought experiment which was meant to show that QM couldn't be the whole picture because ...

    Here's a brief excerpt of my review of "What is Real?" for Nature magazine, which was just published today. Please check out the full review here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158... All hell broke loose in physics some 90 years ago. Quantum theory emerged ? partly in heate...

    QM is undeniably non-intuitive and weird, but the Copenhagen Interpretation(s) are far more weird than necessary, and have been used to sell a lot of quack-pot ideas. There are other interpretations, which are still weird, but much less so. The other interpretations don't require crazy...

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most solid, well-tested parts of physics. Everybody (at least, everybody relevant to this book) agrees how to use quantum mechanics to do things like predict the behavior of semiconductors and molecular bonds. But not everybody agrees on what the theory ...

    One of the grand narratives of the 20th century is the history of physics ? the elucidation of relativity by Einstein and the subsequent development of quantum physics by Bohr, Heisenberg, Schroedinger et al. Richard Rhodes provides a superlative account in The Making of the Atomic B...

    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand, I nearly put the book down a few chapters in. The early material about the initial development of quantum theory was all old news to me, covered (better) in books like ``Thirty Years Which Shook Physics." The actual mechanics of qua...

    This book is a consideration on the failures of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics and the difficulties in advancing a science without a model. The Copenhagen interpretation states that quantum states collapse when a measurement is made but seemingly every word in that ...

    My mind has never been messed up so amazingly. A very inspiring book. ...

    History of some of the confusions, questions, and controversies surrounding quantum mechanics, unfortunately without clear answers because there aren?t any?except that the long and generally accepted Copenhagen interpretation is wrong and has held things back from its outset. When ...

    Adam Becker, a Ph. D. in Physics, writes about interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, the enormously successful 20th century theory underpinning everything from semiconductor electronics to satellite navigation. At the heart of quantum mechanics is the "weirdness" summed up by Heisenberg...

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the foundations of physics (jointly with relativity). Its predictions have been confirmed time and time again and underpins modern technology. It has helped us to understand how the electromagnetic and the two nuclear forces work. It is a remarkable theory. ...

    3.5/5.0 ...

    An excellent book that does not answer the title question?but is mostly convincing that the question is worth asking and that we can make scientific progress in addressing it. The book is well written with an interspersing of human stories, scientific description, and Becker?s own ...

    WIR is a superb popular history and pop science overview of the continuing controversies surrounding the interpretation of quantum theory. In short, it appears: there's no external reality; there is a an external reality, but it's bizarre in one or more of any number of ways (depending...

    I first heard about this book when the author, Adam Becker, was first on Cara Santa Maria's "Talk Nerdy" podcast, and he had such a cool personality and a sound worldview that I knew I was gonna have to pick this book up. I was not disappointed. This is the popsci book I've been wai...

    This book is so redundant. Could relate all the details in half the pages if things were not repeated so many times. ...

    Personally, I take it as a right book at right time. Comprehensive enough, it deals with intertwined ideas which have originated in the field of quantum physics, their mutual influence, evolution and collisions. All in a neatly presented landscape of personalities, institutions, trends...

    I walked up to what i thought was the ice cream counter and got a calzone. Nothing wrong with a calzone, but if the sign and menu say ice cream, even the best calzone is disappointing. I thought this was about the nature of reality and was bored more often than not until the last 2...

    A book for anyone interested in the intersection between physics, philosophy, and history. You don't have to study quantum mechanics to understand this book, but after reading it, you will surely want to. ...

    The first third and the appendix were fantastic. The author adroitly takes complex science concepts and explains them in a very readable fashion. The second two thirds of the book, however, devolved into name soup. I wish this book would have been more science and less history. ...

    An entertaining and interesting overview of some of the issues surrounding the interpretation of quantum mechanics. The author has a strong opinion that the Copenhagen interpretation (to the extent that such a thing exists) involving wavefunction collapse is bankrupt, although he's not...

    Copenhagen, many-worlds, pilot waves, spontaneous collapse, non-localism, hidden variables, falsifiability, logical positivism, Bell's Theorem, the EPR paper, cosmological constant,...These ideas and the people behind them make up Adam Becker's wonderful account of quantum physics. Lik...

    Overall I thought this was an excellent history of the foundations and growing up of quantum theory as well as how the biases of large figures in the field have had vast impact on the way that quantum theory is taught and thought of today. As mathematics is not used in this book there ...