What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia

What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia

In 2016, headlines declared Appalachia ground zero for America?s ?forgotten tribe? of white working class voters. Journalists flocked to the region to extract sympathetic profiles of families devastated by poverty, abandoned by establishment politics, and eager to consume cheap campaign promises. What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia is a frank assessment of America? In 2016, headlines declared Appalachia ground zero for America?s ?forgotten tribe? of white working class v...

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Title:What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia
Author:Elizabeth Catte
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0998904147
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:150 pages pages

What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia Reviews

  • stephanie
    Jan 30, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

  • Garen
    Apr 05, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

  • Carrie
    Jan 14, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

  • Bookworm
    Mar 28, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

    As I mentioned in my review of Hillbilly Elegy, I spent part of my childhood in Appalachian Ohio, and the rest of it two counties outside it. My father?s family is from deep Appalachia and have been coal miners for a century. While I would not identify as Appalachian, Appalachian Ohi...

    When you see headlines that begin "In the heart of Trump Country" chances are, you're reading an article about Appalachia written by a journalist who isn?t from there. This often repeated Trump Country narrative, to put it reductively, is usually one of poor uneducated racists with n...

    I had never read J.D. Vance's 'Hillbilly Elegy' after reading/hearing from other voices stating that it's really not a good representation of his subject(s) and that it's really more about a launching a political office career. So when I saw Catte's response plus a few other articles i...

  • Tuck
    May 20, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

  • Ryan Mishap
    Feb 26, 2019

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

    As I mentioned in my review of Hillbilly Elegy, I spent part of my childhood in Appalachian Ohio, and the rest of it two counties outside it. My father?s family is from deep Appalachia and have been coal miners for a century. While I would not identify as Appalachian, Appalachian Ohi...

    When you see headlines that begin "In the heart of Trump Country" chances are, you're reading an article about Appalachia written by a journalist who isn?t from there. This often repeated Trump Country narrative, to put it reductively, is usually one of poor uneducated racists with n...

    I had never read J.D. Vance's 'Hillbilly Elegy' after reading/hearing from other voices stating that it's really not a good representation of his subject(s) and that it's really more about a launching a political office career. So when I saw Catte's response plus a few other articles i...

    Who would you guess has the best background to write about Appalachia, a writer and historian from East Tennessee with a PhD in public history, or a venture capitalist who wrote his own personal memoir? In What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, historian Elizabeth Catte compiles ...

    Catte seems to have written this book primarily to express her anger over J. D. Vance's book Hillbilly Elegy, which she sees as biased and unfair. She presents some of the history of Appalachia and how the people living there have been used and cheated in order to enrich the coffers of...

    I'm not sure what I am getting wrong about Appalachia and I just finished this book. The author didn't seem to know where she wanted to go with this aside from getting it out the door to capitalize on the enthusiasm about "Hillbilly Elegy." It had a very haphazard "structure" that neve...

    Forget Hillybilly Elegy. This is the book you need to read. ...

    If you have read Hillbilly Elegy, read this. If you are considering reading Hillbilly Elegy, read this instead. Catte adeptly exposes the weakness of myriad political and cultural prescriptions made by JD Vance, who has lately gained fame and influence as a translator of Appalachia...

    I was so hoping this was a comeback to J.D. Vance's Hillbilly Elegy and it so very much is--and more. Not only does she point out the flaws of Vance's book that I recognized, but--as a historian and a citizen of the area--she does so much more. The book is mainly concerned with ext...

  • Dennis Fischman
    May 25, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

  • Lesa
    Jul 27, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

    As I mentioned in my review of Hillbilly Elegy, I spent part of my childhood in Appalachian Ohio, and the rest of it two counties outside it. My father?s family is from deep Appalachia and have been coal miners for a century. While I would not identify as Appalachian, Appalachian Ohi...

    When you see headlines that begin "In the heart of Trump Country" chances are, you're reading an article about Appalachia written by a journalist who isn?t from there. This often repeated Trump Country narrative, to put it reductively, is usually one of poor uneducated racists with n...

    I had never read J.D. Vance's 'Hillbilly Elegy' after reading/hearing from other voices stating that it's really not a good representation of his subject(s) and that it's really more about a launching a political office career. So when I saw Catte's response plus a few other articles i...

    Who would you guess has the best background to write about Appalachia, a writer and historian from East Tennessee with a PhD in public history, or a venture capitalist who wrote his own personal memoir? In What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, historian Elizabeth Catte compiles ...

  • Shomeret
    Jul 01, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

  • Ran
    Jan 27, 2019

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

    As I mentioned in my review of Hillbilly Elegy, I spent part of my childhood in Appalachian Ohio, and the rest of it two counties outside it. My father?s family is from deep Appalachia and have been coal miners for a century. While I would not identify as Appalachian, Appalachian Ohi...

    When you see headlines that begin "In the heart of Trump Country" chances are, you're reading an article about Appalachia written by a journalist who isn?t from there. This often repeated Trump Country narrative, to put it reductively, is usually one of poor uneducated racists with n...

    I had never read J.D. Vance's 'Hillbilly Elegy' after reading/hearing from other voices stating that it's really not a good representation of his subject(s) and that it's really more about a launching a political office career. So when I saw Catte's response plus a few other articles i...

    Who would you guess has the best background to write about Appalachia, a writer and historian from East Tennessee with a PhD in public history, or a venture capitalist who wrote his own personal memoir? In What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, historian Elizabeth Catte compiles ...

    Catte seems to have written this book primarily to express her anger over J. D. Vance's book Hillbilly Elegy, which she sees as biased and unfair. She presents some of the history of Appalachia and how the people living there have been used and cheated in order to enrich the coffers of...

    I'm not sure what I am getting wrong about Appalachia and I just finished this book. The author didn't seem to know where she wanted to go with this aside from getting it out the door to capitalize on the enthusiasm about "Hillbilly Elegy." It had a very haphazard "structure" that neve...

    Forget Hillybilly Elegy. This is the book you need to read. ...

    If you have read Hillbilly Elegy, read this. If you are considering reading Hillbilly Elegy, read this instead. Catte adeptly exposes the weakness of myriad political and cultural prescriptions made by JD Vance, who has lately gained fame and influence as a translator of Appalachia...

    I was so hoping this was a comeback to J.D. Vance's Hillbilly Elegy and it so very much is--and more. Not only does she point out the flaws of Vance's book that I recognized, but--as a historian and a citizen of the area--she does so much more. The book is mainly concerned with ext...

    I should start this review with a confession: Hillbilly Elegy has just taken up space unread on my Kindle for years (since approx. November 2016). And Elizabeth Catte's work here just put an ax directly into any desire to finish that book with this powerful, short take-down of the po...

  • Autumn
    Jul 30, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

  • notgettingenough
    Jul 05, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

  • Cody Sexton
    Nov 04, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

    As I mentioned in my review of Hillbilly Elegy, I spent part of my childhood in Appalachian Ohio, and the rest of it two counties outside it. My father?s family is from deep Appalachia and have been coal miners for a century. While I would not identify as Appalachian, Appalachian Ohi...

    When you see headlines that begin "In the heart of Trump Country" chances are, you're reading an article about Appalachia written by a journalist who isn?t from there. This often repeated Trump Country narrative, to put it reductively, is usually one of poor uneducated racists with n...

  • Melissa
    Feb 21, 2019

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

  • Jessaka
    Mar 15, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

  • Bonnie
    Apr 26, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

    As I mentioned in my review of Hillbilly Elegy, I spent part of my childhood in Appalachian Ohio, and the rest of it two counties outside it. My father?s family is from deep Appalachia and have been coal miners for a century. While I would not identify as Appalachian, Appalachian Ohi...

    When you see headlines that begin "In the heart of Trump Country" chances are, you're reading an article about Appalachia written by a journalist who isn?t from there. This often repeated Trump Country narrative, to put it reductively, is usually one of poor uneducated racists with n...

    I had never read J.D. Vance's 'Hillbilly Elegy' after reading/hearing from other voices stating that it's really not a good representation of his subject(s) and that it's really more about a launching a political office career. So when I saw Catte's response plus a few other articles i...

    Who would you guess has the best background to write about Appalachia, a writer and historian from East Tennessee with a PhD in public history, or a venture capitalist who wrote his own personal memoir? In What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, historian Elizabeth Catte compiles ...

    Catte seems to have written this book primarily to express her anger over J. D. Vance's book Hillbilly Elegy, which she sees as biased and unfair. She presents some of the history of Appalachia and how the people living there have been used and cheated in order to enrich the coffers of...

    I'm not sure what I am getting wrong about Appalachia and I just finished this book. The author didn't seem to know where she wanted to go with this aside from getting it out the door to capitalize on the enthusiasm about "Hillbilly Elegy." It had a very haphazard "structure" that neve...

    Forget Hillybilly Elegy. This is the book you need to read. ...

  • Connie
    Dec 26, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    Feb 25, 2019

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

  • David
    Mar 18, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

    As I mentioned in my review of Hillbilly Elegy, I spent part of my childhood in Appalachian Ohio, and the rest of it two counties outside it. My father?s family is from deep Appalachia and have been coal miners for a century. While I would not identify as Appalachian, Appalachian Ohi...

    When you see headlines that begin "In the heart of Trump Country" chances are, you're reading an article about Appalachia written by a journalist who isn?t from there. This often repeated Trump Country narrative, to put it reductively, is usually one of poor uneducated racists with n...

    I had never read J.D. Vance's 'Hillbilly Elegy' after reading/hearing from other voices stating that it's really not a good representation of his subject(s) and that it's really more about a launching a political office career. So when I saw Catte's response plus a few other articles i...

    Who would you guess has the best background to write about Appalachia, a writer and historian from East Tennessee with a PhD in public history, or a venture capitalist who wrote his own personal memoir? In What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, historian Elizabeth Catte compiles ...

    Catte seems to have written this book primarily to express her anger over J. D. Vance's book Hillbilly Elegy, which she sees as biased and unfair. She presents some of the history of Appalachia and how the people living there have been used and cheated in order to enrich the coffers of...

    I'm not sure what I am getting wrong about Appalachia and I just finished this book. The author didn't seem to know where she wanted to go with this aside from getting it out the door to capitalize on the enthusiasm about "Hillbilly Elegy." It had a very haphazard "structure" that neve...

    Forget Hillybilly Elegy. This is the book you need to read. ...

    If you have read Hillbilly Elegy, read this. If you are considering reading Hillbilly Elegy, read this instead. Catte adeptly exposes the weakness of myriad political and cultural prescriptions made by JD Vance, who has lately gained fame and influence as a translator of Appalachia...

    I was so hoping this was a comeback to J.D. Vance's Hillbilly Elegy and it so very much is--and more. Not only does she point out the flaws of Vance's book that I recognized, but--as a historian and a citizen of the area--she does so much more. The book is mainly concerned with ext...

    I should start this review with a confession: Hillbilly Elegy has just taken up space unread on my Kindle for years (since approx. November 2016). And Elizabeth Catte's work here just put an ax directly into any desire to finish that book with this powerful, short take-down of the po...

    I have not read Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J.D. Vance, but Catte's book is a direct response to the bestselling tome. Here, the author attempts to dispel misconceptions the public in general has about Appalachia as well as some of the untruths includ...

    Myths (not to say "Lies") about Appalachia have a long history of being used for various purposes, not often for the good of the region. Those myths keep the rest of ignorant, too, so that's why I'm strongly urging everyone to read this book. It won't take much of your time, but you'll...

  • Karin
    Mar 16, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

  • Jeimy
    Feb 24, 2019

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

    As I mentioned in my review of Hillbilly Elegy, I spent part of my childhood in Appalachian Ohio, and the rest of it two counties outside it. My father?s family is from deep Appalachia and have been coal miners for a century. While I would not identify as Appalachian, Appalachian Ohi...

    When you see headlines that begin "In the heart of Trump Country" chances are, you're reading an article about Appalachia written by a journalist who isn?t from there. This often repeated Trump Country narrative, to put it reductively, is usually one of poor uneducated racists with n...

    I had never read J.D. Vance's 'Hillbilly Elegy' after reading/hearing from other voices stating that it's really not a good representation of his subject(s) and that it's really more about a launching a political office career. So when I saw Catte's response plus a few other articles i...

    Who would you guess has the best background to write about Appalachia, a writer and historian from East Tennessee with a PhD in public history, or a venture capitalist who wrote his own personal memoir? In What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, historian Elizabeth Catte compiles ...

    Catte seems to have written this book primarily to express her anger over J. D. Vance's book Hillbilly Elegy, which she sees as biased and unfair. She presents some of the history of Appalachia and how the people living there have been used and cheated in order to enrich the coffers of...

    I'm not sure what I am getting wrong about Appalachia and I just finished this book. The author didn't seem to know where she wanted to go with this aside from getting it out the door to capitalize on the enthusiasm about "Hillbilly Elegy." It had a very haphazard "structure" that neve...

    Forget Hillybilly Elegy. This is the book you need to read. ...

    If you have read Hillbilly Elegy, read this. If you are considering reading Hillbilly Elegy, read this instead. Catte adeptly exposes the weakness of myriad political and cultural prescriptions made by JD Vance, who has lately gained fame and influence as a translator of Appalachia...

    I was so hoping this was a comeback to J.D. Vance's Hillbilly Elegy and it so very much is--and more. Not only does she point out the flaws of Vance's book that I recognized, but--as a historian and a citizen of the area--she does so much more. The book is mainly concerned with ext...

    I should start this review with a confession: Hillbilly Elegy has just taken up space unread on my Kindle for years (since approx. November 2016). And Elizabeth Catte's work here just put an ax directly into any desire to finish that book with this powerful, short take-down of the po...

    I have not read Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J.D. Vance, but Catte's book is a direct response to the bestselling tome. Here, the author attempts to dispel misconceptions the public in general has about Appalachia as well as some of the untruths includ...

  • Judy
    Apr 12, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

    As I mentioned in my review of Hillbilly Elegy, I spent part of my childhood in Appalachian Ohio, and the rest of it two counties outside it. My father?s family is from deep Appalachia and have been coal miners for a century. While I would not identify as Appalachian, Appalachian Ohi...

    When you see headlines that begin "In the heart of Trump Country" chances are, you're reading an article about Appalachia written by a journalist who isn?t from there. This often repeated Trump Country narrative, to put it reductively, is usually one of poor uneducated racists with n...

    I had never read J.D. Vance's 'Hillbilly Elegy' after reading/hearing from other voices stating that it's really not a good representation of his subject(s) and that it's really more about a launching a political office career. So when I saw Catte's response plus a few other articles i...

    Who would you guess has the best background to write about Appalachia, a writer and historian from East Tennessee with a PhD in public history, or a venture capitalist who wrote his own personal memoir? In What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, historian Elizabeth Catte compiles ...

    Catte seems to have written this book primarily to express her anger over J. D. Vance's book Hillbilly Elegy, which she sees as biased and unfair. She presents some of the history of Appalachia and how the people living there have been used and cheated in order to enrich the coffers of...

  • Sean
    Jan 25, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

  • Matthew Noe
    Feb 10, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

  • Bruce
    Feb 28, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

  • Dana Sweeney
    Jan 01, 2019

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

    As I mentioned in my review of Hillbilly Elegy, I spent part of my childhood in Appalachian Ohio, and the rest of it two counties outside it. My father?s family is from deep Appalachia and have been coal miners for a century. While I would not identify as Appalachian, Appalachian Ohi...

    When you see headlines that begin "In the heart of Trump Country" chances are, you're reading an article about Appalachia written by a journalist who isn?t from there. This often repeated Trump Country narrative, to put it reductively, is usually one of poor uneducated racists with n...

    I had never read J.D. Vance's 'Hillbilly Elegy' after reading/hearing from other voices stating that it's really not a good representation of his subject(s) and that it's really more about a launching a political office career. So when I saw Catte's response plus a few other articles i...

    Who would you guess has the best background to write about Appalachia, a writer and historian from East Tennessee with a PhD in public history, or a venture capitalist who wrote his own personal memoir? In What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, historian Elizabeth Catte compiles ...

    Catte seems to have written this book primarily to express her anger over J. D. Vance's book Hillbilly Elegy, which she sees as biased and unfair. She presents some of the history of Appalachia and how the people living there have been used and cheated in order to enrich the coffers of...

    I'm not sure what I am getting wrong about Appalachia and I just finished this book. The author didn't seem to know where she wanted to go with this aside from getting it out the door to capitalize on the enthusiasm about "Hillbilly Elegy." It had a very haphazard "structure" that neve...

    Forget Hillybilly Elegy. This is the book you need to read. ...

    If you have read Hillbilly Elegy, read this. If you are considering reading Hillbilly Elegy, read this instead. Catte adeptly exposes the weakness of myriad political and cultural prescriptions made by JD Vance, who has lately gained fame and influence as a translator of Appalachia...

  • Karin
    Jan 22, 2019

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

  • Annie
    Aug 05, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

    As I mentioned in my review of Hillbilly Elegy, I spent part of my childhood in Appalachian Ohio, and the rest of it two counties outside it. My father?s family is from deep Appalachia and have been coal miners for a century. While I would not identify as Appalachian, Appalachian Ohi...

  • Austin Gilbert
    Aug 30, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

  • Rachel Blakeman
    Feb 12, 2018

    A Rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy While reading Hillbilly Elegy was a fun read, I also saw it as a book that held the same ideals as those of a certain segment of our society that believe that you just need to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and get religion, and then all will be okay...

    If you felt at all compelled to read Hillbilly Elegy, do yourself a favor by reading Elizabeth Catte's work. She convincingly tears apart many of the stereotypes Vance perpetuates, giving a much more nuanced history of the region, from the vast exploitation of land, people, and resourc...

    To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like . A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white phot...

    The Appalachian region has been in the news frequently since the 2016 election, and the publication of J.D. Vance's popular book. Historian Elizabeth Catte gives a fuller picture of who lives in Appalachia and the roots of its problems. In addition to the stereotypical Scots Irish whit...

    I?m going to quit my job and walk the earth with a knapsack full of copies of this book and hand them out whenever I hear someone mention hillbilly elegy. ...

    She gives voice to my issues with "Hillbilly Elegy" ("In Elegy...white Appalachians take on the qualities of an oppressed minority much in the same way that conservative individuals view African Americans: as people who have suffered hardships, but ultimately are only holding themselve...

    I started reading Elizabeth Catte?s book and could not stop. I?ve underlined and written notes all through the text of course. My guess is that a good proportion of my friends saw thorough J. D. Vance?s hideous ?Hillbilly Elegy?, but it?s a monster best seller and soon to b...

    When I came across commentary about Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, I thought about what I knew of the history of the region and it didn't sit right. So I never did read it. I figured that I wouldn't get any fresh insight from Vance. I read Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders many years...

    A must-read. And as someone who's from Appalachia, I really appreciate her analysis of the region and rebuttal against the horrific stereotypes we're plagued with. ...

    I thought I knew a few things about Appalachia, but in 150 pages, Catte has taught me: *That sympathy for the region and disgust for it can be two sides of the same coin. *That any problem you can find in Appalachia, you can find all over America. *That the image of Appalachia...

    Author highlights the blacks liberals Latinos progressives of this mountain region and how tree and coal and people exploitation has shaped the culture and economy. And how many many people are fighting to change that pattern. ...

    I feel like I need to preface this review by saying I'm not into discussing or reading politics.  Anyone who spends enough time on social media knows the insanity of watching people argue their beliefs online.  It's a waste of time and energy. I didn't bother reading Hillbilly Ele...

    JD Vance?s Book, Hillbilly Elegy, infuriated me. Vance claimed to explain Appalachia to the world, but he completely ignored the historical context that created the poverty of Appalachia. Instead he blamed that poverty on the failings of culturally inferior individuals, completely ig...

    A vital rebuke of Vance, but more than that, a strong foundational history of the region that leaves you ready for more. Which, kindly enough, Catte provides plenty of suggestions on where to go next. ...

    Everyone, please read this book. ...

    Not just a refreshing rebuttal to JD Vance's troubling memoir; a great leftist primer on diversity and agency in Appalachia. ...

    This blew me right outta the Ohio River. This was a fantastic pushback against stereotypes and poverty porn and complacency and the Scoundrel JD Vance. I felt pride, I felt outrage, and I felt solidarity. This is a Strong Recommend. ...

    Short but necessary counterpoint to Hillbilly Elegy. Catte reviews labor and race issues in Appalachia with far greater nuance than the standard "Trump Country " narrative. ...

    As I mentioned in my review of Hillbilly Elegy, I spent part of my childhood in Appalachian Ohio, and the rest of it two counties outside it. My father?s family is from deep Appalachia and have been coal miners for a century. While I would not identify as Appalachian, Appalachian Ohi...

    When you see headlines that begin "In the heart of Trump Country" chances are, you're reading an article about Appalachia written by a journalist who isn?t from there. This often repeated Trump Country narrative, to put it reductively, is usually one of poor uneducated racists with n...

    I had never read J.D. Vance's 'Hillbilly Elegy' after reading/hearing from other voices stating that it's really not a good representation of his subject(s) and that it's really more about a launching a political office career. So when I saw Catte's response plus a few other articles i...

    Who would you guess has the best background to write about Appalachia, a writer and historian from East Tennessee with a PhD in public history, or a venture capitalist who wrote his own personal memoir? In What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, historian Elizabeth Catte compiles ...

    Catte seems to have written this book primarily to express her anger over J. D. Vance's book Hillbilly Elegy, which she sees as biased and unfair. She presents some of the history of Appalachia and how the people living there have been used and cheated in order to enrich the coffers of...

    I'm not sure what I am getting wrong about Appalachia and I just finished this book. The author didn't seem to know where she wanted to go with this aside from getting it out the door to capitalize on the enthusiasm about "Hillbilly Elegy." It had a very haphazard "structure" that neve...