A Tokyo Romance: A Memoir

A Tokyo Romance: A Memoir

A classic memoir of self-invention in a strange land: Ian Buruma's unflinching account of his amazing journey into the heart of Tokyo's underground culture as a young man in the 1970's When Ian Buruma arrived in Tokyo in 1975, Japan was little more than an idea in his mind, a fantasy of a distant land. A sensitive misfit in the world of his upper middleclass youth, what he A classic memoir of self-invention in a strange land: Ian Buruma's unflinching account of his amazing journey into the...

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Title:A Tokyo Romance: A Memoir
Author:Ian Buruma
Rating:
Genres:Autobiography
ISBN:1101981415
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:256 pages pages

A Tokyo Romance: A Memoir Reviews

  • Fritz
    Mar 21, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Tosh
    Mar 29, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

  • Jim Coughenour
    Mar 13, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

  • Lawrence
    Apr 28, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Sara
    Mar 24, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

  • Vicki
    May 03, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

  • Jenny
    Mar 10, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

  • Stephen Durrant
    Apr 21, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

  • Ginni
    Apr 17, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

    ...

    ...

  • Marianne Meyers
    May 10, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

  • Gayle Zawilla
    Feb 22, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

  • T
    Mar 11, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

  • Simon  Turner
    May 09, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Christian Corpora
    Mar 24, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Adriana
    Mar 02, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

  • Charlie
    Mar 18, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

  • Michelle Olms
    Feb 05, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

  • Bevan
    Apr 18, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

  • Jim Coleman
    Apr 04, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

  • Jonathan Biddle
    Mar 26, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Holly Barker
    Mar 30, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    I read a chapter of this book and have no desire to continue. The description makes it sound fascinating, but I found the prose scattered and a bit morose. ...

  • Julie Barnes
    May 15, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Joseph
    Apr 20, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • bookreader
    Mar 18, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

  • Matthew Friedel
    Apr 13, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Maria
    May 02, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Michael Howells
    Mar 17, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

    Great book ...

    4.5 It was fascinating to learn about Ankoku Butoh, a modern Japanese form "invented" by Hijikata in the late 1950's as a deliberately grotesque aesthetic reaction against Western ballet and classical Japanese dance. Rebelling against ballet, what a unique idea. Some dances might incl...

    As the author himself admits, John Nathan's Japan memoir is both more interesting & impressive. ...

    ...

  • Sam Law
    Apr 13, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

  • Sam May
    Mar 19, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...

    This is a memoir about a "gaijin" (a white person) in Japan in the late '70s. I was surprised at the contemporary films, theater, and art scene described (at times reminiscent of what I've read about the Andy Warhol scene at the Factory in its outrageousness). Ultimately everything had...

    One of the best memoirs of a place and time that I've ever read. His observational abilities are excellent. If you've been a student travelling and living in a foreign country, this will speak to you. He also followed many avant garde performers during his time there which is also very...

    This was a DNF for me. Just not my type of book. ...

    A very disappointing book from this writer and essayist. ...

    Very interesting read about an expat?s experience in the elusive Japanese way of life and the clash of cultures between gaijin and Japanese. ...

  • Mboconnor31
    Apr 16, 2018

    Over the years, and especially going back and forth from Japan, I have read many books by fellow Americans and some British citizens on their time spent in Japan. A lot of them are crap. The ones that stand out are the ones that wrote about Japanese cinema and literature. The girls or ...

    This memoir is both a poignant account of Buruma's romance with Japan, a romance that both succeeds and fails, and also a compelling "insider" account of 1970s Japanese avant-garde culture, particularly the theater of Juro Kara. Buruma confronts an old problem with insight and sympathy...

    I was prepared to love this book and looked forward to a trip down memory lane since I was also in Japan during the time period Buruma is writing about. But it's more of a brag about his own youthful sexual exploits and unless you have a really strong interest in Japanese cinema, a lot...

    A great source of reading ideas for me these days is the weekly NYTimes Book Review "By The Book" column where I was first introduced to Ian Buruma who I hadn't heard of before. The idea of this book resonated with me as my wife and I spent two years in Japan. Buruma was attracted to J...

    An unfinished book that regularly reappears on my bedside table is The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan, or its alternate, The Japan Journals: 1947-2004. Richie arrived in Japan in 1947 and ended up enjoying the rest of his life there ? the journals, writings on Jap...

    Exceptional meditation/memoir of the author's years in Japan in the mid-70's, mostly as a student. Do not look to this to help you understand Japan or the Japanese. Such understanding would come obliquely, as the author examines his "otherness" vis-a-vis both the Japanese and Westerner...

    Buruma spent several years in Japan experiencing all he could about the post-war, avant-garde theater scene in Tokyo. It?s incredibly interesting to get such a privileged view of the somewhat crazy and hyper-cultural counter culture of Japan in the 70s, even more so when it comes fro...

    West meets East and past meets future in this somewhat self-indulgent retrospective into the ?gaijin? author?s foray into the creative, if sometimes seedy, underground culture of 1970s Tokyo. It reads like an ethnography in parts, which I guess it is. I was given an advance copy ...

    This is a memoir, by the editor of the New York Review of Books, which takes us largely to his life in Japan, between 1975 and 1981. Read More Book Reviews on my blog It's Good To Read Summary A restless, bored, middle-class youth in the Netherlands, Buruma felt that he never ...

    Fascinating tale, memoir. It starts off with a privileged baby boomer from Holland, albeit his mother is a Jewish woman from a England whose brother was John Schlesinger, director of the iconic 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. The description of the upheaval of the 60s was interesting mainly...