Autism in Heels: The Untold Story of a Female Life on the Spectrum

Autism in Heels: The Untold Story of a Female Life on the Spectrum

The face of autism is changing. And more often than we realize, that face is wearing lipstick. Autism in Heels , an intimate memoir, reveals the woman inside one of autism's most prominent figures, Jennifer O'Toole. At the age of thirty-five, Jennifer was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, and for the first time in her life, things made sense. Now, Jennifer exposes the co The face of autism is changing. And more often than we realize, that face is wearing lipstick. Autism in Heels ...

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Title:Autism in Heels: The Untold Story of a Female Life on the Spectrum
Author:Jennifer O'Toole
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:1510732845
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:272 pages pages

Autism in Heels: The Untold Story of a Female Life on the Spectrum Reviews

  • Lynnea
    Apr 12, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

    A good look at life with autism from the point of view of a female, in whom it was and maybe still is woefully under diagnosed. The style of writing suggests the condition, perhaps: very concerned with the self, even whiny on occasion, and not always able to see things from others' poi...

    This book sheds light on the often unrecognized differences in the world experiences of women and girls on the spectrum through one woman?s journey. O?Toole?s narrative weaves together her life in self-reflective stories along with the research and study information that helps ex...

    Jennifer O'Toole's latest book is a brilliant and personal reflection of life on the autism spectrum for women and girls. Her voice cannot be denied! I wholeheartedly recommend this book to clinicians, parents, identifiers, and explorers of autism. Reading it will increase your knowled...

    Autism in Heels is a true story about Jennifer O'Toole. Jennifer shares her story about what it's like to live with Asperger's, which is on the Autism spectrum. This is a great story that advocates for people who live with a disability and shows that they are just like everyone else. T...

    This book provides such great info about autism, and especially about girls and women on the spectrum. The author corrects stereotypes as well as relating her own story of not receiving her diagnosis until she was 34. ...

    This book is a real eye opener to the world of autism. Very informational and a great read. ...

    I think this perspective needs a greater voice in ASD research and the world. I found it very hard to read though. ...

    I love this book! I am a redhead girl with autism . I felt like she tore pages from my diary and wrote this book. It moved me from start to finish. Her honesty and openness is inspiring !!! ...

    Absolutely enthralling - this book really brings to light so much. An excellent read for anyone. ...

    Interesting, but imperfectly written. In desperate need of some good editing, but worth a read if you are willing to skim some of the worst bits. ...

    I have so many thoughts and feelings about this book that I can't put into words. But I'm so glad she wrote this book. I will definitely be taking a look at her other books as well though. ...

    I think this is decent book but, at this time, I just couldn't get into it. ...

  • Crystal (Goddess in the Stacks)
    Mar 27, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

  • Rachel
    Jan 27, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

  • Tanya
    Feb 16, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

    A good look at life with autism from the point of view of a female, in whom it was and maybe still is woefully under diagnosed. The style of writing suggests the condition, perhaps: very concerned with the self, even whiny on occasion, and not always able to see things from others' poi...

    This book sheds light on the often unrecognized differences in the world experiences of women and girls on the spectrum through one woman?s journey. O?Toole?s narrative weaves together her life in self-reflective stories along with the research and study information that helps ex...

    Jennifer O'Toole's latest book is a brilliant and personal reflection of life on the autism spectrum for women and girls. Her voice cannot be denied! I wholeheartedly recommend this book to clinicians, parents, identifiers, and explorers of autism. Reading it will increase your knowled...

    Autism in Heels is a true story about Jennifer O'Toole. Jennifer shares her story about what it's like to live with Asperger's, which is on the Autism spectrum. This is a great story that advocates for people who live with a disability and shows that they are just like everyone else. T...

    This book provides such great info about autism, and especially about girls and women on the spectrum. The author corrects stereotypes as well as relating her own story of not receiving her diagnosis until she was 34. ...

    This book is a real eye opener to the world of autism. Very informational and a great read. ...

    I think this perspective needs a greater voice in ASD research and the world. I found it very hard to read though. ...

    I love this book! I am a redhead girl with autism . I felt like she tore pages from my diary and wrote this book. It moved me from start to finish. Her honesty and openness is inspiring !!! ...

    Absolutely enthralling - this book really brings to light so much. An excellent read for anyone. ...

    Interesting, but imperfectly written. In desperate need of some good editing, but worth a read if you are willing to skim some of the worst bits. ...

    I have so many thoughts and feelings about this book that I can't put into words. But I'm so glad she wrote this book. I will definitely be taking a look at her other books as well though. ...

  • Heather
    Mar 20, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

    A good look at life with autism from the point of view of a female, in whom it was and maybe still is woefully under diagnosed. The style of writing suggests the condition, perhaps: very concerned with the self, even whiny on occasion, and not always able to see things from others' poi...

    This book sheds light on the often unrecognized differences in the world experiences of women and girls on the spectrum through one woman?s journey. O?Toole?s narrative weaves together her life in self-reflective stories along with the research and study information that helps ex...

    Jennifer O'Toole's latest book is a brilliant and personal reflection of life on the autism spectrum for women and girls. Her voice cannot be denied! I wholeheartedly recommend this book to clinicians, parents, identifiers, and explorers of autism. Reading it will increase your knowled...

    Autism in Heels is a true story about Jennifer O'Toole. Jennifer shares her story about what it's like to live with Asperger's, which is on the Autism spectrum. This is a great story that advocates for people who live with a disability and shows that they are just like everyone else. T...

    This book provides such great info about autism, and especially about girls and women on the spectrum. The author corrects stereotypes as well as relating her own story of not receiving her diagnosis until she was 34. ...

    This book is a real eye opener to the world of autism. Very informational and a great read. ...

    I think this perspective needs a greater voice in ASD research and the world. I found it very hard to read though. ...

    I love this book! I am a redhead girl with autism . I felt like she tore pages from my diary and wrote this book. It moved me from start to finish. Her honesty and openness is inspiring !!! ...

    Absolutely enthralling - this book really brings to light so much. An excellent read for anyone. ...

    Interesting, but imperfectly written. In desperate need of some good editing, but worth a read if you are willing to skim some of the worst bits. ...

  • Lauren
    Feb 25, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

    A good look at life with autism from the point of view of a female, in whom it was and maybe still is woefully under diagnosed. The style of writing suggests the condition, perhaps: very concerned with the self, even whiny on occasion, and not always able to see things from others' poi...

    This book sheds light on the often unrecognized differences in the world experiences of women and girls on the spectrum through one woman?s journey. O?Toole?s narrative weaves together her life in self-reflective stories along with the research and study information that helps ex...

    Jennifer O'Toole's latest book is a brilliant and personal reflection of life on the autism spectrum for women and girls. Her voice cannot be denied! I wholeheartedly recommend this book to clinicians, parents, identifiers, and explorers of autism. Reading it will increase your knowled...

    Autism in Heels is a true story about Jennifer O'Toole. Jennifer shares her story about what it's like to live with Asperger's, which is on the Autism spectrum. This is a great story that advocates for people who live with a disability and shows that they are just like everyone else. T...

    This book provides such great info about autism, and especially about girls and women on the spectrum. The author corrects stereotypes as well as relating her own story of not receiving her diagnosis until she was 34. ...

    This book is a real eye opener to the world of autism. Very informational and a great read. ...

    I think this perspective needs a greater voice in ASD research and the world. I found it very hard to read though. ...

  • Ronnie Stephens
    Jul 11, 2018

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

  • Rebecca
    Mar 31, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

  • Sandi
    Apr 23, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

  • C.G. Drews
    Jun 25, 2018

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

  • Heather
    Jan 11, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

  • Gara
    Jul 11, 2018

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

  • Annalisa
    Jan 09, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

  • Heather
    Jun 16, 2018

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

  • Jalyn
    Feb 26, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

  • LillyBooks
    Feb 22, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

  • Carol Moog
    Jun 05, 2018

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

    A good look at life with autism from the point of view of a female, in whom it was and maybe still is woefully under diagnosed. The style of writing suggests the condition, perhaps: very concerned with the self, even whiny on occasion, and not always able to see things from others' poi...

    This book sheds light on the often unrecognized differences in the world experiences of women and girls on the spectrum through one woman?s journey. O?Toole?s narrative weaves together her life in self-reflective stories along with the research and study information that helps ex...

    Jennifer O'Toole's latest book is a brilliant and personal reflection of life on the autism spectrum for women and girls. Her voice cannot be denied! I wholeheartedly recommend this book to clinicians, parents, identifiers, and explorers of autism. Reading it will increase your knowled...

  • Isabelle
    Jul 27, 2018

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

  • Paulette Illmann
    Apr 01, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

    A good look at life with autism from the point of view of a female, in whom it was and maybe still is woefully under diagnosed. The style of writing suggests the condition, perhaps: very concerned with the self, even whiny on occasion, and not always able to see things from others' poi...

    This book sheds light on the often unrecognized differences in the world experiences of women and girls on the spectrum through one woman?s journey. O?Toole?s narrative weaves together her life in self-reflective stories along with the research and study information that helps ex...

    Jennifer O'Toole's latest book is a brilliant and personal reflection of life on the autism spectrum for women and girls. Her voice cannot be denied! I wholeheartedly recommend this book to clinicians, parents, identifiers, and explorers of autism. Reading it will increase your knowled...

    Autism in Heels is a true story about Jennifer O'Toole. Jennifer shares her story about what it's like to live with Asperger's, which is on the Autism spectrum. This is a great story that advocates for people who live with a disability and shows that they are just like everyone else. T...

    This book provides such great info about autism, and especially about girls and women on the spectrum. The author corrects stereotypes as well as relating her own story of not receiving her diagnosis until she was 34. ...

    This book is a real eye opener to the world of autism. Very informational and a great read. ...

    I think this perspective needs a greater voice in ASD research and the world. I found it very hard to read though. ...

    I love this book! I am a redhead girl with autism . I felt like she tore pages from my diary and wrote this book. It moved me from start to finish. Her honesty and openness is inspiring !!! ...

    Absolutely enthralling - this book really brings to light so much. An excellent read for anyone. ...

  • rachel
    Feb 24, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

  • Erica Alexander
    Feb 01, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

    A good look at life with autism from the point of view of a female, in whom it was and maybe still is woefully under diagnosed. The style of writing suggests the condition, perhaps: very concerned with the self, even whiny on occasion, and not always able to see things from others' poi...

    This book sheds light on the often unrecognized differences in the world experiences of women and girls on the spectrum through one woman?s journey. O?Toole?s narrative weaves together her life in self-reflective stories along with the research and study information that helps ex...

    Jennifer O'Toole's latest book is a brilliant and personal reflection of life on the autism spectrum for women and girls. Her voice cannot be denied! I wholeheartedly recommend this book to clinicians, parents, identifiers, and explorers of autism. Reading it will increase your knowled...

    Autism in Heels is a true story about Jennifer O'Toole. Jennifer shares her story about what it's like to live with Asperger's, which is on the Autism spectrum. This is a great story that advocates for people who live with a disability and shows that they are just like everyone else. T...

    This book provides such great info about autism, and especially about girls and women on the spectrum. The author corrects stereotypes as well as relating her own story of not receiving her diagnosis until she was 34. ...

    This book is a real eye opener to the world of autism. Very informational and a great read. ...

    I think this perspective needs a greater voice in ASD research and the world. I found it very hard to read though. ...

    I love this book! I am a redhead girl with autism . I felt like she tore pages from my diary and wrote this book. It moved me from start to finish. Her honesty and openness is inspiring !!! ...

  • Anne Wellman
    Feb 23, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

    A good look at life with autism from the point of view of a female, in whom it was and maybe still is woefully under diagnosed. The style of writing suggests the condition, perhaps: very concerned with the self, even whiny on occasion, and not always able to see things from others' poi...

  • Jenna
    Apr 08, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

  • Claire
    Dec 21, 2018

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

  • Michael Ross
    May 27, 2018

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

  • Rebecca Mullen
    May 27, 2018

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

    A good look at life with autism from the point of view of a female, in whom it was and maybe still is woefully under diagnosed. The style of writing suggests the condition, perhaps: very concerned with the self, even whiny on occasion, and not always able to see things from others' poi...

    This book sheds light on the often unrecognized differences in the world experiences of women and girls on the spectrum through one woman?s journey. O?Toole?s narrative weaves together her life in self-reflective stories along with the research and study information that helps ex...

  • Mary Northrup
    Feb 27, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

    A good look at life with autism from the point of view of a female, in whom it was and maybe still is woefully under diagnosed. The style of writing suggests the condition, perhaps: very concerned with the self, even whiny on occasion, and not always able to see things from others' poi...

    This book sheds light on the often unrecognized differences in the world experiences of women and girls on the spectrum through one woman?s journey. O?Toole?s narrative weaves together her life in self-reflective stories along with the research and study information that helps ex...

    Jennifer O'Toole's latest book is a brilliant and personal reflection of life on the autism spectrum for women and girls. Her voice cannot be denied! I wholeheartedly recommend this book to clinicians, parents, identifiers, and explorers of autism. Reading it will increase your knowled...

    Autism in Heels is a true story about Jennifer O'Toole. Jennifer shares her story about what it's like to live with Asperger's, which is on the Autism spectrum. This is a great story that advocates for people who live with a disability and shows that they are just like everyone else. T...

    This book provides such great info about autism, and especially about girls and women on the spectrum. The author corrects stereotypes as well as relating her own story of not receiving her diagnosis until she was 34. ...

  • Brittney Farley
    Dec 06, 2018

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

    A good look at life with autism from the point of view of a female, in whom it was and maybe still is woefully under diagnosed. The style of writing suggests the condition, perhaps: very concerned with the self, even whiny on occasion, and not always able to see things from others' poi...

    This book sheds light on the often unrecognized differences in the world experiences of women and girls on the spectrum through one woman?s journey. O?Toole?s narrative weaves together her life in self-reflective stories along with the research and study information that helps ex...

    Jennifer O'Toole's latest book is a brilliant and personal reflection of life on the autism spectrum for women and girls. Her voice cannot be denied! I wholeheartedly recommend this book to clinicians, parents, identifiers, and explorers of autism. Reading it will increase your knowled...

    Autism in Heels is a true story about Jennifer O'Toole. Jennifer shares her story about what it's like to live with Asperger's, which is on the Autism spectrum. This is a great story that advocates for people who live with a disability and shows that they are just like everyone else. T...

  • Rachel Archer
    Mar 13, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

  • Jamie
    Mar 02, 2019

    This book was so honest and well-informed! I was a little nervous going in, I admit, because (a) I feel like the only point of heels is to utilise them as a weapon, and (b) I've read so many autism-books and been burnt a lot by negative assumptions and problematic viewpoints. But this ...

    I really struggled with this book. I wanted to love it, and I believe that it's a vital conversation about women on the spectrum and how to improve practices around diagnosing/supporting women on the spectrum. However, the writing was choppy and repetitive; many chapters felt like adap...

    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.) I actually had to take a break in the middle of reading this because it struck home ? not just close, but all the way. As in, I recognized very specific thoughts and behaviors that I?ve noticed but never c...

    It has been great to see more and more books available detailing the experiences of various (albeit mostly white) women on the autistic spectrum, given their under-diagnosis and the biases that pervade the perception of autism among the public and even the medical community (as I under...

    I really liked this one and felt very 'seen' by all of Jennifer's life stories, but like other reviews here I struggled with her insertion of Sojourner Truth's quote and many 'facts' (without citations). As someone who is on the spectrum, a woman, and recovering (always in process) fro...

    2.5 stars clever title and cover picture which grabbed my attention. unfortunately, i was disappointed. it wasn't the lighthearted memoir i was expecting. very wordy & long. on the positive side, i learned a lot about the autism spectrum & how it effects each gender dif...

    This is an amazing book. An extraordinary look into autism in women told with fascinating anecdotes from a captivating writer. I have always enjoyed the Asperkids books but Jennifer O'Toole has really outdone herself describing this personal journey. I was riveted from the first moment...

    This is a very well written book about a lady who has Augsberger when she was an adult I think from reading this book she as high functioning person I like this book I work d in Mental Health for 36 years so I had some knowledge all ready great book ...

    Despite some issues that I think could have been resolved with better editing, I recommend this book to all teachers and basically anyone. You will come away with a better understanding of people on the autism spectrum as well as just people in general. We all have our own reality and ...

    The strongest part of this book was definitely the memoir aspects, where O'Toole engaged with the elements of her own past and made sense of them by unveiling the consequences of a neurotypical culture. I found her chapters towards the end, which featured heavy topics like relationship...

    Highly disappointing. As someone who's followed Jennifer O'Toole's work for quite some time, I was excited to see that she was releasing a memoir. More so, I was excited to see that it would focus on being a woman on the spectrum, a topic that's come up often in the circles I run in. ...

    I have never before in my life read a memoir, mostly because I'm not particularly interested in them. But my mother-in-law checked this out from the library for me, and I mostly started reading it because I was too awkward to give it back to her without at least trying to read it. Sure...

    I try to be very mindful when reviewing books on autism, or other #ownvoices books that I'm not part of the demographic. They're very important books for people who are not of that demographic to read - that's how we learn about each other - but we get into iffy territory when reviewin...

    I found this book endlessly fascinating, and it led to some interesting conversations with other women I know (who are all geeks, who are in STEM-based careers, who all have active hobbies, some of whom are hyperlexic . . . I'm not saying we're on the spectrum, but I think we're the ty...

    I struggled with this book and read the first third of it pretty slowly. I was trying to absorb all the vocabulary and I was also trying to read it as a memoir. It's not a straight forward memoir though. Maybe she pieced together various speeches she had given, research, and journal no...

    WOW! Just WOW! I first heard Jennifer speak in January of this year. She mentioned that she had a new book coming out this summer. At that point, I knew that I had to get my hands on it. Later on I discovered that the digital ARC was available on Edelweiss?YIPPEE! (Being a lib...

    Insight into the dynamics of life "on the spectrum" is helpful to me, since my granddaughter has been diagnosed with autism. She received this diagnosis at 2, but this was after repeated efforts to determine what was going on with her. One doctor, discovering her severe social anxiety,...

    I loved this. I was recently diagnosed with autism and while the diagnosis answered so many questions, I wanted to know more. A friend of mine has read this book, and I found myself drawn to it. I?m so glad to have read it. From making friends, to sexual abuse, to self-harm, O?...

    A good look at life with autism from the point of view of a female, in whom it was and maybe still is woefully under diagnosed. The style of writing suggests the condition, perhaps: very concerned with the self, even whiny on occasion, and not always able to see things from others' poi...

    This book sheds light on the often unrecognized differences in the world experiences of women and girls on the spectrum through one woman?s journey. O?Toole?s narrative weaves together her life in self-reflective stories along with the research and study information that helps ex...

    Jennifer O'Toole's latest book is a brilliant and personal reflection of life on the autism spectrum for women and girls. Her voice cannot be denied! I wholeheartedly recommend this book to clinicians, parents, identifiers, and explorers of autism. Reading it will increase your knowled...

    Autism in Heels is a true story about Jennifer O'Toole. Jennifer shares her story about what it's like to live with Asperger's, which is on the Autism spectrum. This is a great story that advocates for people who live with a disability and shows that they are just like everyone else. T...

    This book provides such great info about autism, and especially about girls and women on the spectrum. The author corrects stereotypes as well as relating her own story of not receiving her diagnosis until she was 34. ...

    This book is a real eye opener to the world of autism. Very informational and a great read. ...