That Kind of Mother

That Kind of Mother

From the celebrated author of Rich and Pretty, a novel about the families we fight to build and those we fight to keep Like many first-time mothers, Rebecca Stone finds herself both deeply in love with her newborn son and deeply overwhelmed. Struggling to juggle the demands of motherhood with her own aspirations and feeling utterly alone in the process, she reaches out to t From the celebrated author of Rich and Pretty, a novel about the families we fight to build and those we fight to...

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Title:That Kind of Mother
Author:Rumaan Alam
Rating:
Genres:Fiction
ISBN:0062667602
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:291 pages pages

That Kind of Mother Reviews

  • eb
    Jun 06, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

    I don't know if I'll ever recover from how well Rumaan Alam writes women. He does it incredibly well in Rich and Pretty, and he does it again in That Kind of Mother. Of course, I can't relate to motherhood, but I can still relate to a lot of Rebecca and her world - sometimes in way...

    Alam gets motherhood so exactly right?the simultaneous and entirely opposed feelings, the physical sensations, the loneliness, the pleasures. The plot of this novel hums along interestingly, and the issues it tackles (interracial adoption, well-meaning but clueless white liberalism) ...

  • karen
    Jun 05, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

  • Emily
    May 20, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

  • Celeste Ng
    Nov 21, 2017

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

  • Kristen
    Jun 26, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

    I don't know if I'll ever recover from how well Rumaan Alam writes women. He does it incredibly well in Rich and Pretty, and he does it again in That Kind of Mother. Of course, I can't relate to motherhood, but I can still relate to a lot of Rebecca and her world - sometimes in way...

    Alam gets motherhood so exactly right?the simultaneous and entirely opposed feelings, the physical sensations, the loneliness, the pleasures. The plot of this novel hums along interestingly, and the issues it tackles (interracial adoption, well-meaning but clueless white liberalism) ...

    If this is any indicator of the reading to come in 2018, we're in for a good year. Brilliant! ...

    This novel is less about motherhood than it is about morality. It will generate rich book club discussions. The book doesn't find its groove until about 20% in, so be patient. Spoilers below. (view spoiler)[ From that point to the last page, it becomes clear that while this book ...

    **** 1/2 Loved this book though I'm not usually one for books about motherhood. But I was drawn to this one in part because the author, Rumaan Alam, is not a woman and in part because everyone raves about his first book, Rich and Pretty. Most men don't write female characters in co...

    I love this sophomore effort from Rumaan more than Rich and Pretty. The galley features a letter from him that mentions a reality of fiction - we writers borrow from real life but some of it cannot be true. Rumaan has never had a child but here, in his protagonist, Rebecca, we see the ...

    DNF at 48% I thought I?d love this novel about a woman who adopts the child of her nanny after she dies during childbirth because two of my top recommendation sources (Annie Jones from From the Front Porch podcast and Tyler Goodson, Manager at Avid Bookshop in Athens, GA) rated it...

    I loved this book! The writing is fantastic, each sentence its own delight. It's that rare kind of novel that entertains with every scene, while at the same time turning over serious, important issues -- in this case: motherhood, race, class, female ambition, and female friendship. Reb...

    Excellent book (I like it much better than Rich and Pretty). I read this alongside Olga Grushin's Forty Rooms and found that they work really well as a pairing of looking at family, motherhood, identity, and purpose. ...

    This was interesting and enjoyable... but some of the connections felt forced? like the Princess Diana thing.... or maybe I?m just like ?stop writing about motherhood, dudes.? ...

  • Tess
    May 20, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

  • Samantha
    May 30, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

    I don't know if I'll ever recover from how well Rumaan Alam writes women. He does it incredibly well in Rich and Pretty, and he does it again in That Kind of Mother. Of course, I can't relate to motherhood, but I can still relate to a lot of Rebecca and her world - sometimes in way...

  • Joshunda Sanders
    Apr 26, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

    I don't know if I'll ever recover from how well Rumaan Alam writes women. He does it incredibly well in Rich and Pretty, and he does it again in That Kind of Mother. Of course, I can't relate to motherhood, but I can still relate to a lot of Rebecca and her world - sometimes in way...

    Alam gets motherhood so exactly right?the simultaneous and entirely opposed feelings, the physical sensations, the loneliness, the pleasures. The plot of this novel hums along interestingly, and the issues it tackles (interracial adoption, well-meaning but clueless white liberalism) ...

    If this is any indicator of the reading to come in 2018, we're in for a good year. Brilliant! ...

    This novel is less about motherhood than it is about morality. It will generate rich book club discussions. The book doesn't find its groove until about 20% in, so be patient. Spoilers below. (view spoiler)[ From that point to the last page, it becomes clear that while this book ...

    **** 1/2 Loved this book though I'm not usually one for books about motherhood. But I was drawn to this one in part because the author, Rumaan Alam, is not a woman and in part because everyone raves about his first book, Rich and Pretty. Most men don't write female characters in co...

    I love this sophomore effort from Rumaan more than Rich and Pretty. The galley features a letter from him that mentions a reality of fiction - we writers borrow from real life but some of it cannot be true. Rumaan has never had a child but here, in his protagonist, Rebecca, we see the ...

  • Alicia
    May 11, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

    I don't know if I'll ever recover from how well Rumaan Alam writes women. He does it incredibly well in Rich and Pretty, and he does it again in That Kind of Mother. Of course, I can't relate to motherhood, but I can still relate to a lot of Rebecca and her world - sometimes in way...

    Alam gets motherhood so exactly right?the simultaneous and entirely opposed feelings, the physical sensations, the loneliness, the pleasures. The plot of this novel hums along interestingly, and the issues it tackles (interracial adoption, well-meaning but clueless white liberalism) ...

    If this is any indicator of the reading to come in 2018, we're in for a good year. Brilliant! ...

    This novel is less about motherhood than it is about morality. It will generate rich book club discussions. The book doesn't find its groove until about 20% in, so be patient. Spoilers below. (view spoiler)[ From that point to the last page, it becomes clear that while this book ...

    **** 1/2 Loved this book though I'm not usually one for books about motherhood. But I was drawn to this one in part because the author, Rumaan Alam, is not a woman and in part because everyone raves about his first book, Rich and Pretty. Most men don't write female characters in co...

    I love this sophomore effort from Rumaan more than Rich and Pretty. The galley features a letter from him that mentions a reality of fiction - we writers borrow from real life but some of it cannot be true. Rumaan has never had a child but here, in his protagonist, Rebecca, we see the ...

    DNF at 48% I thought I?d love this novel about a woman who adopts the child of her nanny after she dies during childbirth because two of my top recommendation sources (Annie Jones from From the Front Porch podcast and Tyler Goodson, Manager at Avid Bookshop in Athens, GA) rated it...

    I loved this book! The writing is fantastic, each sentence its own delight. It's that rare kind of novel that entertains with every scene, while at the same time turning over serious, important issues -- in this case: motherhood, race, class, female ambition, and female friendship. Reb...

    Excellent book (I like it much better than Rich and Pretty). I read this alongside Olga Grushin's Forty Rooms and found that they work really well as a pairing of looking at family, motherhood, identity, and purpose. ...

    This was interesting and enjoyable... but some of the connections felt forced? like the Princess Diana thing.... or maybe I?m just like ?stop writing about motherhood, dudes.? ...

    http://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2018/05... This is the kind of book where, the whole time you're reading, a voice in the back of your head is going "wooooow" for the writing, but also is terrified for the characters because everything feels so precarious. The story centers on Rebecca,...

  • Ginger
    May 26, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

  • Amanda
    Jun 07, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

    I don't know if I'll ever recover from how well Rumaan Alam writes women. He does it incredibly well in Rich and Pretty, and he does it again in That Kind of Mother. Of course, I can't relate to motherhood, but I can still relate to a lot of Rebecca and her world - sometimes in way...

    Alam gets motherhood so exactly right?the simultaneous and entirely opposed feelings, the physical sensations, the loneliness, the pleasures. The plot of this novel hums along interestingly, and the issues it tackles (interracial adoption, well-meaning but clueless white liberalism) ...

    If this is any indicator of the reading to come in 2018, we're in for a good year. Brilliant! ...

    This novel is less about motherhood than it is about morality. It will generate rich book club discussions. The book doesn't find its groove until about 20% in, so be patient. Spoilers below. (view spoiler)[ From that point to the last page, it becomes clear that while this book ...

    **** 1/2 Loved this book though I'm not usually one for books about motherhood. But I was drawn to this one in part because the author, Rumaan Alam, is not a woman and in part because everyone raves about his first book, Rich and Pretty. Most men don't write female characters in co...

    I love this sophomore effort from Rumaan more than Rich and Pretty. The galley features a letter from him that mentions a reality of fiction - we writers borrow from real life but some of it cannot be true. Rumaan has never had a child but here, in his protagonist, Rebecca, we see the ...

    DNF at 48% I thought I?d love this novel about a woman who adopts the child of her nanny after she dies during childbirth because two of my top recommendation sources (Annie Jones from From the Front Porch podcast and Tyler Goodson, Manager at Avid Bookshop in Athens, GA) rated it...

    I loved this book! The writing is fantastic, each sentence its own delight. It's that rare kind of novel that entertains with every scene, while at the same time turning over serious, important issues -- in this case: motherhood, race, class, female ambition, and female friendship. Reb...

    Excellent book (I like it much better than Rich and Pretty). I read this alongside Olga Grushin's Forty Rooms and found that they work really well as a pairing of looking at family, motherhood, identity, and purpose. ...

  • Sonya
    May 18, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

    I don't know if I'll ever recover from how well Rumaan Alam writes women. He does it incredibly well in Rich and Pretty, and he does it again in That Kind of Mother. Of course, I can't relate to motherhood, but I can still relate to a lot of Rebecca and her world - sometimes in way...

    Alam gets motherhood so exactly right?the simultaneous and entirely opposed feelings, the physical sensations, the loneliness, the pleasures. The plot of this novel hums along interestingly, and the issues it tackles (interracial adoption, well-meaning but clueless white liberalism) ...

    If this is any indicator of the reading to come in 2018, we're in for a good year. Brilliant! ...

    This novel is less about motherhood than it is about morality. It will generate rich book club discussions. The book doesn't find its groove until about 20% in, so be patient. Spoilers below. (view spoiler)[ From that point to the last page, it becomes clear that while this book ...

  • Emily
    Feb 06, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

  • Kalen
    May 01, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

    I don't know if I'll ever recover from how well Rumaan Alam writes women. He does it incredibly well in Rich and Pretty, and he does it again in That Kind of Mother. Of course, I can't relate to motherhood, but I can still relate to a lot of Rebecca and her world - sometimes in way...

    Alam gets motherhood so exactly right?the simultaneous and entirely opposed feelings, the physical sensations, the loneliness, the pleasures. The plot of this novel hums along interestingly, and the issues it tackles (interracial adoption, well-meaning but clueless white liberalism) ...

    If this is any indicator of the reading to come in 2018, we're in for a good year. Brilliant! ...

    This novel is less about motherhood than it is about morality. It will generate rich book club discussions. The book doesn't find its groove until about 20% in, so be patient. Spoilers below. (view spoiler)[ From that point to the last page, it becomes clear that while this book ...

    **** 1/2 Loved this book though I'm not usually one for books about motherhood. But I was drawn to this one in part because the author, Rumaan Alam, is not a woman and in part because everyone raves about his first book, Rich and Pretty. Most men don't write female characters in co...

  • BooksnFreshair (Poornima Apte)
    Dec 27, 2017

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

    I don't know if I'll ever recover from how well Rumaan Alam writes women. He does it incredibly well in Rich and Pretty, and he does it again in That Kind of Mother. Of course, I can't relate to motherhood, but I can still relate to a lot of Rebecca and her world - sometimes in way...

    Alam gets motherhood so exactly right?the simultaneous and entirely opposed feelings, the physical sensations, the loneliness, the pleasures. The plot of this novel hums along interestingly, and the issues it tackles (interracial adoption, well-meaning but clueless white liberalism) ...

    If this is any indicator of the reading to come in 2018, we're in for a good year. Brilliant! ...

  • Canadian Reader
    Jul 07, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

  • Naima Coster
    May 08, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

  • Melissa
    May 21, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

  • Ella
    May 10, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

  • Angela M
    May 11, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

  • Stephanie
    May 16, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

  • Mary
    May 23, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

  • Paige
    Feb 13, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

  • Erin Glover
    Jun 27, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

  • Jennifer Blankfein
    May 10, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

  • Lisa Eckstein
    May 21, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

    I don't know if I'll ever recover from how well Rumaan Alam writes women. He does it incredibly well in Rich and Pretty, and he does it again in That Kind of Mother. Of course, I can't relate to motherhood, but I can still relate to a lot of Rebecca and her world - sometimes in way...

    Alam gets motherhood so exactly right?the simultaneous and entirely opposed feelings, the physical sensations, the loneliness, the pleasures. The plot of this novel hums along interestingly, and the issues it tackles (interracial adoption, well-meaning but clueless white liberalism) ...

    If this is any indicator of the reading to come in 2018, we're in for a good year. Brilliant! ...

    This novel is less about motherhood than it is about morality. It will generate rich book club discussions. The book doesn't find its groove until about 20% in, so be patient. Spoilers below. (view spoiler)[ From that point to the last page, it becomes clear that while this book ...

    **** 1/2 Loved this book though I'm not usually one for books about motherhood. But I was drawn to this one in part because the author, Rumaan Alam, is not a woman and in part because everyone raves about his first book, Rich and Pretty. Most men don't write female characters in co...

    I love this sophomore effort from Rumaan more than Rich and Pretty. The galley features a letter from him that mentions a reality of fiction - we writers borrow from real life but some of it cannot be true. Rumaan has never had a child but here, in his protagonist, Rebecca, we see the ...

    DNF at 48% I thought I?d love this novel about a woman who adopts the child of her nanny after she dies during childbirth because two of my top recommendation sources (Annie Jones from From the Front Porch podcast and Tyler Goodson, Manager at Avid Bookshop in Athens, GA) rated it...

    I loved this book! The writing is fantastic, each sentence its own delight. It's that rare kind of novel that entertains with every scene, while at the same time turning over serious, important issues -- in this case: motherhood, race, class, female ambition, and female friendship. Reb...

    Excellent book (I like it much better than Rich and Pretty). I read this alongside Olga Grushin's Forty Rooms and found that they work really well as a pairing of looking at family, motherhood, identity, and purpose. ...

    This was interesting and enjoyable... but some of the connections felt forced? like the Princess Diana thing.... or maybe I?m just like ?stop writing about motherhood, dudes.? ...

    http://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2018/05... This is the kind of book where, the whole time you're reading, a voice in the back of your head is going "wooooow" for the writing, but also is terrified for the characters because everything feels so precarious. The story centers on Rebecca,...

    Rebecca gives birth to her first child and is helped through the difficult early days by Priscilla, a lactation consultant at the hospital. Rebecca feels a friendship growing and then hires Priscilla as a nanny, changing the dynamic of their developing relationship. Rebecca is white an...

  • Afoma Umesi
    May 07, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

  • Ellen Gail
    May 19, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

  • Sarah at Sarah's Book Shelves
    Apr 30, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

    I don't know if I'll ever recover from how well Rumaan Alam writes women. He does it incredibly well in Rich and Pretty, and he does it again in That Kind of Mother. Of course, I can't relate to motherhood, but I can still relate to a lot of Rebecca and her world - sometimes in way...

    Alam gets motherhood so exactly right?the simultaneous and entirely opposed feelings, the physical sensations, the loneliness, the pleasures. The plot of this novel hums along interestingly, and the issues it tackles (interracial adoption, well-meaning but clueless white liberalism) ...

    If this is any indicator of the reading to come in 2018, we're in for a good year. Brilliant! ...

    This novel is less about motherhood than it is about morality. It will generate rich book club discussions. The book doesn't find its groove until about 20% in, so be patient. Spoilers below. (view spoiler)[ From that point to the last page, it becomes clear that while this book ...

    **** 1/2 Loved this book though I'm not usually one for books about motherhood. But I was drawn to this one in part because the author, Rumaan Alam, is not a woman and in part because everyone raves about his first book, Rich and Pretty. Most men don't write female characters in co...

    I love this sophomore effort from Rumaan more than Rich and Pretty. The galley features a letter from him that mentions a reality of fiction - we writers borrow from real life but some of it cannot be true. Rumaan has never had a child but here, in his protagonist, Rebecca, we see the ...

    DNF at 48% I thought I?d love this novel about a woman who adopts the child of her nanny after she dies during childbirth because two of my top recommendation sources (Annie Jones from From the Front Porch podcast and Tyler Goodson, Manager at Avid Bookshop in Athens, GA) rated it...

  • Heather Abel
    Mar 19, 2018

    THAT KIND OF MOTHER dives deep into big questions about parenthood, adoption, and race: Is mothering something learned, or that you're born to? How far can good intentions stretch? And most of all, can love can really overcome the boundaries of race and class? With his unerring eye for...

    Setting this aside . May come back to it at another time . Just not connecting . ...

    Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Pricilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Pricilla, having mothering experience herself as she was a single, teen mom many years ago, leaves her job at the hospital to becomes the nanny for Rebecca?s ba...

    my new quarterly literary fiction box from pagehabit has arrived!! better get cracking! ...

    I read THAT KIND OF MOTHER because I was intrigued primarily by the situation the book would examine: an interracial family made by adoption, a relationship between two women across lines of race and class, and the differences between two brothers in society who are equally beloved by ...

    Have I read this yet? No. Has Penny snuggled with it? Yes. And it was adorable. May this book be as good as the kitty snuggling it. ...

    After reading 50 pages about breast feeding and La Leche League, I didn't understand how this book got published. It describes the mundane aspects of early motherhood in too much detail. Really, who cares about what it takes to get an infant to latch onto the breast? Who cares that it'...

    2.5 stars I didn?t pick this book up to read about a privileged white woman who never really addressed her privileged whiteness. ...

    This book was simultaneously beautifully written and intensely boring. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing really did. Even the big things that happened felt so small. I think the book was just too subtle for my liking. I think I would have enjoyed it more as a short st...

    I wanted to love this. And while it is excellently written, line by line, I became increasingly frustrated and annoyed as the novel wore on with the characters and in many ways, the plot itself, which started to seem irrational. There are parts of motherhood, and the trauma/chaos o...

    It?s not surprising that Celeste Ng blurbed this book. Superficially, at least, Rumaan Alam is concerned with many of same issues as Ng and his novel has some of the same features as her recent Little Fires Everywhere : tensions within a privileged upwardly mobile family, interracia...

    I would give this six stars if I could. Excellent writing, excellent story. ...

    It is so much harder to review things I like. I just noticed that most of my favorite books from this year's reading are left without reviews - that's because when I like something, I often can't tell you why. Here's what I noticed about this book: I expected it to be more hard-hitting...

    Rebecca thinks she is an optimist. Why wouldn't she be? Things have always turned out fine for her. Turns out that her optimism may just be white privilege. This book seems like it's going to tackle race issues, but it's more of an exploration into one woman's life. Yes, she has a bla...

    I really oscillated between three and four stars for this one. Rebecca Stone, a white woman in the 80?s bonds with her black nursing coach, Priscilla. The women strike an odd friendship that continues for a few years until Priscilla becomes pregnant and dies in childbirth. Rebecc...

    If you're looking for an insightful, though provoking book about the struggles of a white woman (Rebecca) raising a black boy, you won't find that here. There are almost no difficulties and that those that do occur are how they impact Rebecca not the child and the novel seems to have r...

    I'm on a "quiet novels about women's interior live"s kick, apparently. The set-up for this - a white woman adopts her black nanny's son after the nanny dies in childbirth - makes it sound much more issue driven than it is, although Alam does weave insights about race throughout. More t...

    The description of this book was more interesting to me than the actual book. I didn't find Rebecca interesting or likable and I felt the the author danced around the issues of race that were raised in the story. All in all I just was left wanting there to be more to the story. ...

    I don't know if I'll ever recover from how well Rumaan Alam writes women. He does it incredibly well in Rich and Pretty, and he does it again in That Kind of Mother. Of course, I can't relate to motherhood, but I can still relate to a lot of Rebecca and her world - sometimes in way...

    Alam gets motherhood so exactly right?the simultaneous and entirely opposed feelings, the physical sensations, the loneliness, the pleasures. The plot of this novel hums along interestingly, and the issues it tackles (interracial adoption, well-meaning but clueless white liberalism) ...

    If this is any indicator of the reading to come in 2018, we're in for a good year. Brilliant! ...

    This novel is less about motherhood than it is about morality. It will generate rich book club discussions. The book doesn't find its groove until about 20% in, so be patient. Spoilers below. (view spoiler)[ From that point to the last page, it becomes clear that while this book ...

    **** 1/2 Loved this book though I'm not usually one for books about motherhood. But I was drawn to this one in part because the author, Rumaan Alam, is not a woman and in part because everyone raves about his first book, Rich and Pretty. Most men don't write female characters in co...

    I love this sophomore effort from Rumaan more than Rich and Pretty. The galley features a letter from him that mentions a reality of fiction - we writers borrow from real life but some of it cannot be true. Rumaan has never had a child but here, in his protagonist, Rebecca, we see the ...

    DNF at 48% I thought I?d love this novel about a woman who adopts the child of her nanny after she dies during childbirth because two of my top recommendation sources (Annie Jones from From the Front Porch podcast and Tyler Goodson, Manager at Avid Bookshop in Athens, GA) rated it...

    I loved this book! The writing is fantastic, each sentence its own delight. It's that rare kind of novel that entertains with every scene, while at the same time turning over serious, important issues -- in this case: motherhood, race, class, female ambition, and female friendship. Reb...