The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present

A sweeping history--and counter-narrative--of Native American life from the Wounded Knee massacre to the present. Dee Brown's 1970 Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee was the first truly popular book of Indian history ever published. But it promulgated the impression that American Indian history essentially ended with the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee--that not only did one hun A sweeping history--and counter-narrative--of Native American life from the Wounded Knee massacre to the present. ...

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Title:The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present
Author:David Treuer
Rating:
Genres:History
ISBN:B077CNXS7B
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:526 pages pages

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present Reviews

  • Bookworm
    Feb 10, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

  • Kate Schwarz
    Feb 15, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

    "This book tells the story of what Indians in the United States have been up to in the 128 years that have elapsed since the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota: what we've done, what's happened to us, what our lives have been like. It is ad...

    Interesting history and perspective of the many Indian Nations from BCE to today. The comparison of the European treatment of Natives and the American Indian?s strategy of how to fight back was well done. Although shockingly violent and sad, the author makes a very good argument of t...

    This was a good book. It fills an important niche--there are few comprehensive accounts of "modern" Indian history (that is to say, history since the end of tribal military resistance) and David Treuer fills that gap marvelously. For the average non-Indian person, this book will be a f...

    David Treuer's book emphasizes what happened after the massacre at Wounded Knee. Prior to Lyndon Johnson' ?War on Poverty? government legislation concerning Native Americans seemed to involve attempts at assimilation of the Indians. This included boarding schools and allotment....

    What a crazy expanse of a book. To begin with the beginning: the origin stories of a handful of the 500+ indigenous tribes of North America. To tell the histories of 5 million peoples, their culture, their interactions and wars and partnerships with Anglos, and to then churn through 12...

    Human Kind is a disease that is slowly and now rapidly destroying the home on which it lives--planet earth--by its very numbers alone. Having become disillusioned and constrained by the feudalism and condescension of the "Old World" Europeans brought the same attitudes and modus operan...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a most informative read. The author David Treuer must feel very proud of this grand accomplishment. Kudos to him! I considered myself fairly well educated on matters of Native America?s history when I saw this book referenced on Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz...

    One evening I picked up this 500 page book from my stack, meaning just to page through, look for pictures. When I looked up, it was midnight and I had read a third of it. How? This is the kind of writing that keeps you moving. Turkey vultures spreading out of the south following road k...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

  • Theresa Connors
    Feb 17, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

  • Scott Martin
    Apr 11, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

    "This book tells the story of what Indians in the United States have been up to in the 128 years that have elapsed since the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota: what we've done, what's happened to us, what our lives have been like. It is ad...

    Interesting history and perspective of the many Indian Nations from BCE to today. The comparison of the European treatment of Natives and the American Indian?s strategy of how to fight back was well done. Although shockingly violent and sad, the author makes a very good argument of t...

    This was a good book. It fills an important niche--there are few comprehensive accounts of "modern" Indian history (that is to say, history since the end of tribal military resistance) and David Treuer fills that gap marvelously. For the average non-Indian person, this book will be a f...

    David Treuer's book emphasizes what happened after the massacre at Wounded Knee. Prior to Lyndon Johnson' ?War on Poverty? government legislation concerning Native Americans seemed to involve attempts at assimilation of the Indians. This included boarding schools and allotment....

    What a crazy expanse of a book. To begin with the beginning: the origin stories of a handful of the 500+ indigenous tribes of North America. To tell the histories of 5 million peoples, their culture, their interactions and wars and partnerships with Anglos, and to then churn through 12...

    Human Kind is a disease that is slowly and now rapidly destroying the home on which it lives--planet earth--by its very numbers alone. Having become disillusioned and constrained by the feudalism and condescension of the "Old World" Europeans brought the same attitudes and modus operan...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a most informative read. The author David Treuer must feel very proud of this grand accomplishment. Kudos to him! I considered myself fairly well educated on matters of Native America?s history when I saw this book referenced on Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz...

    One evening I picked up this 500 page book from my stack, meaning just to page through, look for pictures. When I looked up, it was midnight and I had read a third of it. How? This is the kind of writing that keeps you moving. Turkey vultures spreading out of the south following road k...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    (Audiobook) This book, written by a member of the Ojibwe, offers a discussion of the struggles of Native Americans from the end of the long-standing ?Indian Wars? after Wounded Knee to the present day. Treuer offers the reader a good overview of the legal, political, economic and s...

  • Jessica Anne
    Apr 03, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

    "This book tells the story of what Indians in the United States have been up to in the 128 years that have elapsed since the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota: what we've done, what's happened to us, what our lives have been like. It is ad...

    Interesting history and perspective of the many Indian Nations from BCE to today. The comparison of the European treatment of Natives and the American Indian?s strategy of how to fight back was well done. Although shockingly violent and sad, the author makes a very good argument of t...

    This was a good book. It fills an important niche--there are few comprehensive accounts of "modern" Indian history (that is to say, history since the end of tribal military resistance) and David Treuer fills that gap marvelously. For the average non-Indian person, this book will be a f...

    David Treuer's book emphasizes what happened after the massacre at Wounded Knee. Prior to Lyndon Johnson' ?War on Poverty? government legislation concerning Native Americans seemed to involve attempts at assimilation of the Indians. This included boarding schools and allotment....

    What a crazy expanse of a book. To begin with the beginning: the origin stories of a handful of the 500+ indigenous tribes of North America. To tell the histories of 5 million peoples, their culture, their interactions and wars and partnerships with Anglos, and to then churn through 12...

  • Emily Goenner
    Feb 11, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

  • Elisa
    Mar 03, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

  • Kathy Piselli
    Mar 28, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

    "This book tells the story of what Indians in the United States have been up to in the 128 years that have elapsed since the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota: what we've done, what's happened to us, what our lives have been like. It is ad...

    Interesting history and perspective of the many Indian Nations from BCE to today. The comparison of the European treatment of Natives and the American Indian?s strategy of how to fight back was well done. Although shockingly violent and sad, the author makes a very good argument of t...

    This was a good book. It fills an important niche--there are few comprehensive accounts of "modern" Indian history (that is to say, history since the end of tribal military resistance) and David Treuer fills that gap marvelously. For the average non-Indian person, this book will be a f...

    David Treuer's book emphasizes what happened after the massacre at Wounded Knee. Prior to Lyndon Johnson' ?War on Poverty? government legislation concerning Native Americans seemed to involve attempts at assimilation of the Indians. This included boarding schools and allotment....

    What a crazy expanse of a book. To begin with the beginning: the origin stories of a handful of the 500+ indigenous tribes of North America. To tell the histories of 5 million peoples, their culture, their interactions and wars and partnerships with Anglos, and to then churn through 12...

    Human Kind is a disease that is slowly and now rapidly destroying the home on which it lives--planet earth--by its very numbers alone. Having become disillusioned and constrained by the feudalism and condescension of the "Old World" Europeans brought the same attitudes and modus operan...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a most informative read. The author David Treuer must feel very proud of this grand accomplishment. Kudos to him! I considered myself fairly well educated on matters of Native America?s history when I saw this book referenced on Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz...

    One evening I picked up this 500 page book from my stack, meaning just to page through, look for pictures. When I looked up, it was midnight and I had read a third of it. How? This is the kind of writing that keeps you moving. Turkey vultures spreading out of the south following road k...

  • Patti
    Mar 30, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

  • Raimo Wirkkala
    Mar 14, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

  • Loring Wirbel
    Mar 02, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

  • Joe Kessler
    Feb 13, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

  • Jon Glazer
    Mar 01, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

  • Amber
    Mar 25, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

  • Cheryl Turoczy hart
    Mar 12, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

  • Randall Wallace
    Feb 17, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

  • Angela Kraus
    Mar 27, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

    "This book tells the story of what Indians in the United States have been up to in the 128 years that have elapsed since the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota: what we've done, what's happened to us, what our lives have been like. It is ad...

    Interesting history and perspective of the many Indian Nations from BCE to today. The comparison of the European treatment of Natives and the American Indian?s strategy of how to fight back was well done. Although shockingly violent and sad, the author makes a very good argument of t...

    This was a good book. It fills an important niche--there are few comprehensive accounts of "modern" Indian history (that is to say, history since the end of tribal military resistance) and David Treuer fills that gap marvelously. For the average non-Indian person, this book will be a f...

    David Treuer's book emphasizes what happened after the massacre at Wounded Knee. Prior to Lyndon Johnson' ?War on Poverty? government legislation concerning Native Americans seemed to involve attempts at assimilation of the Indians. This included boarding schools and allotment....

    What a crazy expanse of a book. To begin with the beginning: the origin stories of a handful of the 500+ indigenous tribes of North America. To tell the histories of 5 million peoples, their culture, their interactions and wars and partnerships with Anglos, and to then churn through 12...

    Human Kind is a disease that is slowly and now rapidly destroying the home on which it lives--planet earth--by its very numbers alone. Having become disillusioned and constrained by the feudalism and condescension of the "Old World" Europeans brought the same attitudes and modus operan...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a most informative read. The author David Treuer must feel very proud of this grand accomplishment. Kudos to him! I considered myself fairly well educated on matters of Native America?s history when I saw this book referenced on Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz...

  • Garth Mailman
    Apr 12, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

    "This book tells the story of what Indians in the United States have been up to in the 128 years that have elapsed since the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota: what we've done, what's happened to us, what our lives have been like. It is ad...

    Interesting history and perspective of the many Indian Nations from BCE to today. The comparison of the European treatment of Natives and the American Indian?s strategy of how to fight back was well done. Although shockingly violent and sad, the author makes a very good argument of t...

    This was a good book. It fills an important niche--there are few comprehensive accounts of "modern" Indian history (that is to say, history since the end of tribal military resistance) and David Treuer fills that gap marvelously. For the average non-Indian person, this book will be a f...

    David Treuer's book emphasizes what happened after the massacre at Wounded Knee. Prior to Lyndon Johnson' ?War on Poverty? government legislation concerning Native Americans seemed to involve attempts at assimilation of the Indians. This included boarding schools and allotment....

    What a crazy expanse of a book. To begin with the beginning: the origin stories of a handful of the 500+ indigenous tribes of North America. To tell the histories of 5 million peoples, their culture, their interactions and wars and partnerships with Anglos, and to then churn through 12...

    Human Kind is a disease that is slowly and now rapidly destroying the home on which it lives--planet earth--by its very numbers alone. Having become disillusioned and constrained by the feudalism and condescension of the "Old World" Europeans brought the same attitudes and modus operan...

  • Angie
    Jan 06, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

  • Jen
    Feb 28, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

    "This book tells the story of what Indians in the United States have been up to in the 128 years that have elapsed since the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota: what we've done, what's happened to us, what our lives have been like. It is ad...

    Interesting history and perspective of the many Indian Nations from BCE to today. The comparison of the European treatment of Natives and the American Indian?s strategy of how to fight back was well done. Although shockingly violent and sad, the author makes a very good argument of t...

  • David Schwinghammer
    Mar 12, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

    "This book tells the story of what Indians in the United States have been up to in the 128 years that have elapsed since the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota: what we've done, what's happened to us, what our lives have been like. It is ad...

    Interesting history and perspective of the many Indian Nations from BCE to today. The comparison of the European treatment of Natives and the American Indian?s strategy of how to fight back was well done. Although shockingly violent and sad, the author makes a very good argument of t...

    This was a good book. It fills an important niche--there are few comprehensive accounts of "modern" Indian history (that is to say, history since the end of tribal military resistance) and David Treuer fills that gap marvelously. For the average non-Indian person, this book will be a f...

    David Treuer's book emphasizes what happened after the massacre at Wounded Knee. Prior to Lyndon Johnson' ?War on Poverty? government legislation concerning Native Americans seemed to involve attempts at assimilation of the Indians. This included boarding schools and allotment....

  • Matthew T. Cornwall
    Apr 02, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

    "This book tells the story of what Indians in the United States have been up to in the 128 years that have elapsed since the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota: what we've done, what's happened to us, what our lives have been like. It is ad...

    Interesting history and perspective of the many Indian Nations from BCE to today. The comparison of the European treatment of Natives and the American Indian?s strategy of how to fight back was well done. Although shockingly violent and sad, the author makes a very good argument of t...

    This was a good book. It fills an important niche--there are few comprehensive accounts of "modern" Indian history (that is to say, history since the end of tribal military resistance) and David Treuer fills that gap marvelously. For the average non-Indian person, this book will be a f...

    David Treuer's book emphasizes what happened after the massacre at Wounded Knee. Prior to Lyndon Johnson' ?War on Poverty? government legislation concerning Native Americans seemed to involve attempts at assimilation of the Indians. This included boarding schools and allotment....

    What a crazy expanse of a book. To begin with the beginning: the origin stories of a handful of the 500+ indigenous tribes of North America. To tell the histories of 5 million peoples, their culture, their interactions and wars and partnerships with Anglos, and to then churn through 12...

    Human Kind is a disease that is slowly and now rapidly destroying the home on which it lives--planet earth--by its very numbers alone. Having become disillusioned and constrained by the feudalism and condescension of the "Old World" Europeans brought the same attitudes and modus operan...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a most informative read. The author David Treuer must feel very proud of this grand accomplishment. Kudos to him! I considered myself fairly well educated on matters of Native America?s history when I saw this book referenced on Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz...

    One evening I picked up this 500 page book from my stack, meaning just to page through, look for pictures. When I looked up, it was midnight and I had read a third of it. How? This is the kind of writing that keeps you moving. Turkey vultures spreading out of the south following road k...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    (Audiobook) This book, written by a member of the Ojibwe, offers a discussion of the struggles of Native Americans from the end of the long-standing ?Indian Wars? after Wounded Knee to the present day. Treuer offers the reader a good overview of the legal, political, economic and s...

    Native American author Treuer does an amazing job in this book. Although his concentration (as the subtitle indicates) is on Indian matters following the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, he gives an overview of relations between the indigenous peoples of North America and t...

    There are very few books that cover Native American history from the point where many high school history classes stop, Wounded Knee. David Treuer discusses the good, bad, and the ugly and does a very good job not approaching the history of Native People's in the same way that Dee Brow...

  • Ruby
    Mar 17, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

    "This book tells the story of what Indians in the United States have been up to in the 128 years that have elapsed since the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota: what we've done, what's happened to us, what our lives have been like. It is ad...

  • David Dunlap
    Mar 01, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

    "This book tells the story of what Indians in the United States have been up to in the 128 years that have elapsed since the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota: what we've done, what's happened to us, what our lives have been like. It is ad...

    Interesting history and perspective of the many Indian Nations from BCE to today. The comparison of the European treatment of Natives and the American Indian?s strategy of how to fight back was well done. Although shockingly violent and sad, the author makes a very good argument of t...

    This was a good book. It fills an important niche--there are few comprehensive accounts of "modern" Indian history (that is to say, history since the end of tribal military resistance) and David Treuer fills that gap marvelously. For the average non-Indian person, this book will be a f...

    David Treuer's book emphasizes what happened after the massacre at Wounded Knee. Prior to Lyndon Johnson' ?War on Poverty? government legislation concerning Native Americans seemed to involve attempts at assimilation of the Indians. This included boarding schools and allotment....

    What a crazy expanse of a book. To begin with the beginning: the origin stories of a handful of the 500+ indigenous tribes of North America. To tell the histories of 5 million peoples, their culture, their interactions and wars and partnerships with Anglos, and to then churn through 12...

    Human Kind is a disease that is slowly and now rapidly destroying the home on which it lives--planet earth--by its very numbers alone. Having become disillusioned and constrained by the feudalism and condescension of the "Old World" Europeans brought the same attitudes and modus operan...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a most informative read. The author David Treuer must feel very proud of this grand accomplishment. Kudos to him! I considered myself fairly well educated on matters of Native America?s history when I saw this book referenced on Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz...

    One evening I picked up this 500 page book from my stack, meaning just to page through, look for pictures. When I looked up, it was midnight and I had read a third of it. How? This is the kind of writing that keeps you moving. Turkey vultures spreading out of the south following road k...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    (Audiobook) This book, written by a member of the Ojibwe, offers a discussion of the struggles of Native Americans from the end of the long-standing ?Indian Wars? after Wounded Knee to the present day. Treuer offers the reader a good overview of the legal, political, economic and s...

    Native American author Treuer does an amazing job in this book. Although his concentration (as the subtitle indicates) is on Indian matters following the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, he gives an overview of relations between the indigenous peoples of North America and t...

  • Katie Nunes
    Mar 19, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

  • Alison Labbate
    Feb 02, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

  • Meike
    Feb 27, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

  • Greg
    Mar 05, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...

    I'm originally from southern MN. My hometown is infamous for its cold blooded treatment of Dakota POW who rose up against injustice. The fact that the author is from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern MN made this book all that more special for me. I loved reading about the history...

    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...

    I can?t rate this because it could be read totally differently by someone with more historical knowledge than I. It is described as ?sweeping?, and it certainly is. I had NO IDEA about so many of the historical facts. The Curtis Act? The Dawes Act? Allotment? Indian boarding scho...

    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...

    "This book tells the story of what Indians in the United States have been up to in the 128 years that have elapsed since the 1890 massacre of at least 150 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota: what we've done, what's happened to us, what our lives have been like. It is ad...

    Interesting history and perspective of the many Indian Nations from BCE to today. The comparison of the European treatment of Natives and the American Indian?s strategy of how to fight back was well done. Although shockingly violent and sad, the author makes a very good argument of t...

    This was a good book. It fills an important niche--there are few comprehensive accounts of "modern" Indian history (that is to say, history since the end of tribal military resistance) and David Treuer fills that gap marvelously. For the average non-Indian person, this book will be a f...

  • Peter Beck
    Feb 06, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

  • Liz Mc2
    Apr 09, 2019

    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats: This is my reading experience and reactions to the book. I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents. I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures....

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is Métis. The motto of this book could be ?not dead yet.? Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown?s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past. T...