The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present

A sweeping history--and counter-narrative--of Native American life from the Wounded Knee massacre to the present. Dee Brown's 1970 Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee was the first truly popular book of Indian history ever published. But it promulgated the impression that American Indian history essentially ended with the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee--that not only did one hun A sweeping history--and counter-narrative--of Native American life from the Wounded Knee massacre to the present. ...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present
Author:David Treuer
Rating:
Genres:History
ISBN:B077CNXS7B
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:526 pages pages

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present Reviews

  • Bookworm
    Feb 10, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

  • Sara
    Feb 01, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

  • Kate Schwarz
    Feb 15, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

  • Paige
    Feb 07, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Theresa Connors
    Feb 17, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

  • Andy
    Feb 19, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Gaby Chapman
    Feb 08, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

  • RRC IV
    Feb 07, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Ruth Ann
    Feb 10, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • David Kessler
    Feb 18, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

  • Emily Goenner
    Feb 11, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

  • Mike
    Feb 16, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

  • Alison
    Feb 03, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Tina Miller
    Feb 05, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

  • Joe Kessler
    Feb 13, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

  • Tom Gorski
    Feb 10, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

  • Sean Collins
    Feb 15, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Gwen
    Feb 14, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Neena
    Feb 03, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

    ...

    ...

  • Randall Wallace
    Feb 17, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

  • Joanna
    Feb 12, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

  • Patrick Macke
    Feb 15, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

  • Barbara Van loenen
    Feb 04, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

  • Angie
    Jan 06, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

  • Caitlin
    Feb 07, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Alison Labbate
    Feb 02, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

  • Donna Freeman
    Feb 15, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

    ...

  • Rupert McNally
    Jan 31, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Jayda
    Feb 07, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...

    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...

    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...

    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...

    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...

    Good NYT book review ...

    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...

    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...

    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...

    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...

    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...

    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...

    A commendable book covering the history of American Natives as they carved their lives despite the 'good' intentions of the Federal Government from 1890 to 2017. The culture is evolving in the N. American lands and their relationship to the Feds has changed dramatically in the last 127...

    There is simply too much to cover in a review, but, if you ever wanted a perspective on and of American Indians, you need this book. I finished it feeling proud to live in a place shared with these extraordinary peoples and sure they remain integral to the places and societies that evo...

    It was easier to read than a history textbook, many stories that kept it moving along. However it is not a speed read. It included powerful historical examples of Native leaders; eloquent and thoughtful speakers; not just the victimized tribe stories ...

    The book that needed to be written. The history that seemed to subside after 1890, continued, and now, here it is. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Peter Beck
    Feb 06, 2019

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...

    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...

    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...