Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore

Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore

WINNER OF THE NATIONAL OUTDOOR BOOK AWARD A CHICAGO TRIBUNE TOP TEN BOOK OF 2018 A GUARDIAN, NPR's SCIENCE FRIDAY, PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, AND LIBRARY JOURNAL BEST BOOK OF 2018 Hailed as "deeply felt" (New York Times), "a revelation" (Pacific Standard), and "the book on climate change and sea levels that was missing" (Chicago Tribune), Rising is both a highly original work of ly WINNER OF THE NATIONAL OUTDOOR BOOK AWARD A CHICAGO TRIBUNE TOP TEN BOOK OF 2018 A GUARDIAN, NPR's SCIENCE FR...

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Title:Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore
Author:Elizabeth Rush
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:1571313672
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:320 pages pages

Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore Reviews

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    Sep 14, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

  • Cat
    Aug 05, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...

    Literary sketches of areas affected by climate change. Insightful personal observation and sympathetic interviews but not really a roundup of the science. ...

    quite possibly my favorite book of the year in a category I never quite knew existed - "creative non-fiction" ...

    This is one of those books every American should read. It?s devastating but so timely and makes the issue of climate change ? as it concerns American shores ? human. Beyond the cost to humans, Rush also pays ample attention to what these changes mean for the natural world, the fl...

    Reading Rush?s personal narrative and diverse voices from American coastline communities that are the first hit by rising sea levels transformed my understanding of climate change. This book helped me understand the fuller extent of the inequities and intersectionality that are and w...

    Probably the best damn book I'll read all year. Rush paints evocative portraits of a "New American Shore" I didn't (and I'm sure most readers) even know existed. It's "rising tides" at this very moment. Spellbinding, depressing, well-written, infuriating, and inspiring. A must read. I ...

    Rush performs a very personal exploration of the topic of sea level rise. While some of the journalistic segments of her cross country wanderings are more successful than others, She does educate the reader on the realities of individual suffering as Americans have entered the beginnin...

    I've long been familiar with Elizabeth Rush's work and this book congregates her close observation skills, her deep concern about humans and the natural world, and her empathetic disposition that's always coupled with a journalist's willingness to ask tough questions. The result is a p...

    3 Stars - Liked It I enjoyed this book. It was a relatively fast read dealing with a topic that I'm extremely interested in. However, there were certain shortcomings I couldn't help but notice throughout. In short, the book feels as if it's Miss Rush's first attempt at an actual boo...

    Climate change is in the news almost daily from smaller observations about heat, rain and snowfall to major catastrophes. Rising focuses mainly on America's shores and it would be very easy to say initially that this book is not for me since I tend to live closer to cornfields than bea...

    Rush visits disparate regions of the country affected by sea level rise: Rhode Island, Staten Island, Louisiana, Florida, San Francisco, and Oregon, and interviews people who have been displaced and scientists measuring the ecological impact of the salt flooding into former wetlands. R...

  • Andrew
    Oct 21, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...

    Literary sketches of areas affected by climate change. Insightful personal observation and sympathetic interviews but not really a roundup of the science. ...

    quite possibly my favorite book of the year in a category I never quite knew existed - "creative non-fiction" ...

    This is one of those books every American should read. It?s devastating but so timely and makes the issue of climate change ? as it concerns American shores ? human. Beyond the cost to humans, Rush also pays ample attention to what these changes mean for the natural world, the fl...

    Reading Rush?s personal narrative and diverse voices from American coastline communities that are the first hit by rising sea levels transformed my understanding of climate change. This book helped me understand the fuller extent of the inequities and intersectionality that are and w...

    Probably the best damn book I'll read all year. Rush paints evocative portraits of a "New American Shore" I didn't (and I'm sure most readers) even know existed. It's "rising tides" at this very moment. Spellbinding, depressing, well-written, infuriating, and inspiring. A must read. I ...

  • Pam Cipkowski
    Oct 22, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

  • Karen
    Jun 17, 2019

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

  • Gloria
    Dec 20, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...

    Literary sketches of areas affected by climate change. Insightful personal observation and sympathetic interviews but not really a roundup of the science. ...

    quite possibly my favorite book of the year in a category I never quite knew existed - "creative non-fiction" ...

    This is one of those books every American should read. It?s devastating but so timely and makes the issue of climate change ? as it concerns American shores ? human. Beyond the cost to humans, Rush also pays ample attention to what these changes mean for the natural world, the fl...

    Reading Rush?s personal narrative and diverse voices from American coastline communities that are the first hit by rising sea levels transformed my understanding of climate change. This book helped me understand the fuller extent of the inequities and intersectionality that are and w...

    Probably the best damn book I'll read all year. Rush paints evocative portraits of a "New American Shore" I didn't (and I'm sure most readers) even know existed. It's "rising tides" at this very moment. Spellbinding, depressing, well-written, infuriating, and inspiring. A must read. I ...

    Rush performs a very personal exploration of the topic of sea level rise. While some of the journalistic segments of her cross country wanderings are more successful than others, She does educate the reader on the realities of individual suffering as Americans have entered the beginnin...

    I've long been familiar with Elizabeth Rush's work and this book congregates her close observation skills, her deep concern about humans and the natural world, and her empathetic disposition that's always coupled with a journalist's willingness to ask tough questions. The result is a p...

    3 Stars - Liked It I enjoyed this book. It was a relatively fast read dealing with a topic that I'm extremely interested in. However, there were certain shortcomings I couldn't help but notice throughout. In short, the book feels as if it's Miss Rush's first attempt at an actual boo...

    Climate change is in the news almost daily from smaller observations about heat, rain and snowfall to major catastrophes. Rising focuses mainly on America's shores and it would be very easy to say initially that this book is not for me since I tend to live closer to cornfields than bea...

  • Roxane
    Dec 31, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

  • Laura
    Jul 04, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

  • Barbara Irene Carter
    Jan 25, 2019

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...

    Literary sketches of areas affected by climate change. Insightful personal observation and sympathetic interviews but not really a roundup of the science. ...

    quite possibly my favorite book of the year in a category I never quite knew existed - "creative non-fiction" ...

    This is one of those books every American should read. It?s devastating but so timely and makes the issue of climate change ? as it concerns American shores ? human. Beyond the cost to humans, Rush also pays ample attention to what these changes mean for the natural world, the fl...

    Reading Rush?s personal narrative and diverse voices from American coastline communities that are the first hit by rising sea levels transformed my understanding of climate change. This book helped me understand the fuller extent of the inequities and intersectionality that are and w...

    Probably the best damn book I'll read all year. Rush paints evocative portraits of a "New American Shore" I didn't (and I'm sure most readers) even know existed. It's "rising tides" at this very moment. Spellbinding, depressing, well-written, infuriating, and inspiring. A must read. I ...

    Rush performs a very personal exploration of the topic of sea level rise. While some of the journalistic segments of her cross country wanderings are more successful than others, She does educate the reader on the realities of individual suffering as Americans have entered the beginnin...

    I've long been familiar with Elizabeth Rush's work and this book congregates her close observation skills, her deep concern about humans and the natural world, and her empathetic disposition that's always coupled with a journalist's willingness to ask tough questions. The result is a p...

    3 Stars - Liked It I enjoyed this book. It was a relatively fast read dealing with a topic that I'm extremely interested in. However, there were certain shortcomings I couldn't help but notice throughout. In short, the book feels as if it's Miss Rush's first attempt at an actual boo...

    Climate change is in the news almost daily from smaller observations about heat, rain and snowfall to major catastrophes. Rising focuses mainly on America's shores and it would be very easy to say initially that this book is not for me since I tend to live closer to cornfields than bea...

    Rush visits disparate regions of the country affected by sea level rise: Rhode Island, Staten Island, Louisiana, Florida, San Francisco, and Oregon, and interviews people who have been displaced and scientists measuring the ecological impact of the salt flooding into former wetlands. R...

    There are a few areas that I am not as knowledgeable about as I should be and science is one of those areas. Therefore, when scientists conclude that the planet is warming for various reasons, who am to question their findings. In Elizabeth Rush's new book, Rising: Dispatches from the ...

  • Kathleen
    Jan 13, 2019

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...

    Literary sketches of areas affected by climate change. Insightful personal observation and sympathetic interviews but not really a roundup of the science. ...

    quite possibly my favorite book of the year in a category I never quite knew existed - "creative non-fiction" ...

    This is one of those books every American should read. It?s devastating but so timely and makes the issue of climate change ? as it concerns American shores ? human. Beyond the cost to humans, Rush also pays ample attention to what these changes mean for the natural world, the fl...

    Reading Rush?s personal narrative and diverse voices from American coastline communities that are the first hit by rising sea levels transformed my understanding of climate change. This book helped me understand the fuller extent of the inequities and intersectionality that are and w...

    Probably the best damn book I'll read all year. Rush paints evocative portraits of a "New American Shore" I didn't (and I'm sure most readers) even know existed. It's "rising tides" at this very moment. Spellbinding, depressing, well-written, infuriating, and inspiring. A must read. I ...

    Rush performs a very personal exploration of the topic of sea level rise. While some of the journalistic segments of her cross country wanderings are more successful than others, She does educate the reader on the realities of individual suffering as Americans have entered the beginnin...

    I've long been familiar with Elizabeth Rush's work and this book congregates her close observation skills, her deep concern about humans and the natural world, and her empathetic disposition that's always coupled with a journalist's willingness to ask tough questions. The result is a p...

    3 Stars - Liked It I enjoyed this book. It was a relatively fast read dealing with a topic that I'm extremely interested in. However, there were certain shortcomings I couldn't help but notice throughout. In short, the book feels as if it's Miss Rush's first attempt at an actual boo...

    Climate change is in the news almost daily from smaller observations about heat, rain and snowfall to major catastrophes. Rising focuses mainly on America's shores and it would be very easy to say initially that this book is not for me since I tend to live closer to cornfields than bea...

    Rush visits disparate regions of the country affected by sea level rise: Rhode Island, Staten Island, Louisiana, Florida, San Francisco, and Oregon, and interviews people who have been displaced and scientists measuring the ecological impact of the salt flooding into former wetlands. R...

    There are a few areas that I am not as knowledgeable about as I should be and science is one of those areas. Therefore, when scientists conclude that the planet is warming for various reasons, who am to question their findings. In Elizabeth Rush's new book, Rising: Dispatches from the ...

    In this work, Rush provides an urgent, direct account of Americans already at the perilous mercy of rising seas that I would encourage everyone to read, particularly those like myself residing happily inland in the midwestern portion of our country. She includes detailed interviews ...

  • Cwiegard
    Jul 28, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...

    Literary sketches of areas affected by climate change. Insightful personal observation and sympathetic interviews but not really a roundup of the science. ...

    quite possibly my favorite book of the year in a category I never quite knew existed - "creative non-fiction" ...

    This is one of those books every American should read. It?s devastating but so timely and makes the issue of climate change ? as it concerns American shores ? human. Beyond the cost to humans, Rush also pays ample attention to what these changes mean for the natural world, the fl...

    Reading Rush?s personal narrative and diverse voices from American coastline communities that are the first hit by rising sea levels transformed my understanding of climate change. This book helped me understand the fuller extent of the inequities and intersectionality that are and w...

    Probably the best damn book I'll read all year. Rush paints evocative portraits of a "New American Shore" I didn't (and I'm sure most readers) even know existed. It's "rising tides" at this very moment. Spellbinding, depressing, well-written, infuriating, and inspiring. A must read. I ...

    Rush performs a very personal exploration of the topic of sea level rise. While some of the journalistic segments of her cross country wanderings are more successful than others, She does educate the reader on the realities of individual suffering as Americans have entered the beginnin...

  • David Quinn
    Dec 28, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

  • Jed Mayer
    Jul 05, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

  • Rebecca Renner
    Apr 15, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

  • Shannon
    Jan 21, 2019

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...

    Literary sketches of areas affected by climate change. Insightful personal observation and sympathetic interviews but not really a roundup of the science. ...

    quite possibly my favorite book of the year in a category I never quite knew existed - "creative non-fiction" ...

    This is one of those books every American should read. It?s devastating but so timely and makes the issue of climate change ? as it concerns American shores ? human. Beyond the cost to humans, Rush also pays ample attention to what these changes mean for the natural world, the fl...

  • Bonnie
    May 03, 2019

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

  • Meghan
    Oct 20, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

  • Jacque
    Feb 16, 2019

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...

    Literary sketches of areas affected by climate change. Insightful personal observation and sympathetic interviews but not really a roundup of the science. ...

    quite possibly my favorite book of the year in a category I never quite knew existed - "creative non-fiction" ...

    This is one of those books every American should read. It?s devastating but so timely and makes the issue of climate change ? as it concerns American shores ? human. Beyond the cost to humans, Rush also pays ample attention to what these changes mean for the natural world, the fl...

    Reading Rush?s personal narrative and diverse voices from American coastline communities that are the first hit by rising sea levels transformed my understanding of climate change. This book helped me understand the fuller extent of the inequities and intersectionality that are and w...

  • Tom Metz
    Aug 03, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...

    Literary sketches of areas affected by climate change. Insightful personal observation and sympathetic interviews but not really a roundup of the science. ...

  • Sarah Boon
    Nov 26, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

  • Jak Krumholtz
    Aug 26, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

  • Coleman
    Jul 23, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

  • Yun
    Jun 26, 2019

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

  • Pearse Anderson
    Jan 23, 2019

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

  • Meera Subramanian
    Jul 27, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...

    Literary sketches of areas affected by climate change. Insightful personal observation and sympathetic interviews but not really a roundup of the science. ...

    quite possibly my favorite book of the year in a category I never quite knew existed - "creative non-fiction" ...

    This is one of those books every American should read. It?s devastating but so timely and makes the issue of climate change ? as it concerns American shores ? human. Beyond the cost to humans, Rush also pays ample attention to what these changes mean for the natural world, the fl...

    Reading Rush?s personal narrative and diverse voices from American coastline communities that are the first hit by rising sea levels transformed my understanding of climate change. This book helped me understand the fuller extent of the inequities and intersectionality that are and w...

    Probably the best damn book I'll read all year. Rush paints evocative portraits of a "New American Shore" I didn't (and I'm sure most readers) even know existed. It's "rising tides" at this very moment. Spellbinding, depressing, well-written, infuriating, and inspiring. A must read. I ...

    Rush performs a very personal exploration of the topic of sea level rise. While some of the journalistic segments of her cross country wanderings are more successful than others, She does educate the reader on the realities of individual suffering as Americans have entered the beginnin...

    I've long been familiar with Elizabeth Rush's work and this book congregates her close observation skills, her deep concern about humans and the natural world, and her empathetic disposition that's always coupled with a journalist's willingness to ask tough questions. The result is a p...

  • Jay Parekh
    Sep 06, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...

    Literary sketches of areas affected by climate change. Insightful personal observation and sympathetic interviews but not really a roundup of the science. ...

    quite possibly my favorite book of the year in a category I never quite knew existed - "creative non-fiction" ...

  • Brice Stewart
    Jul 02, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...

    Literary sketches of areas affected by climate change. Insightful personal observation and sympathetic interviews but not really a roundup of the science. ...

    quite possibly my favorite book of the year in a category I never quite knew existed - "creative non-fiction" ...

    This is one of those books every American should read. It?s devastating but so timely and makes the issue of climate change ? as it concerns American shores ? human. Beyond the cost to humans, Rush also pays ample attention to what these changes mean for the natural world, the fl...

    Reading Rush?s personal narrative and diverse voices from American coastline communities that are the first hit by rising sea levels transformed my understanding of climate change. This book helped me understand the fuller extent of the inequities and intersectionality that are and w...

    Probably the best damn book I'll read all year. Rush paints evocative portraits of a "New American Shore" I didn't (and I'm sure most readers) even know existed. It's "rising tides" at this very moment. Spellbinding, depressing, well-written, infuriating, and inspiring. A must read. I ...

    Rush performs a very personal exploration of the topic of sea level rise. While some of the journalistic segments of her cross country wanderings are more successful than others, She does educate the reader on the realities of individual suffering as Americans have entered the beginnin...

    I've long been familiar with Elizabeth Rush's work and this book congregates her close observation skills, her deep concern about humans and the natural world, and her empathetic disposition that's always coupled with a journalist's willingness to ask tough questions. The result is a p...

    3 Stars - Liked It I enjoyed this book. It was a relatively fast read dealing with a topic that I'm extremely interested in. However, there were certain shortcomings I couldn't help but notice throughout. In short, the book feels as if it's Miss Rush's first attempt at an actual boo...

  • Annie Harvieux
    Jun 24, 2018

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

  • Phil Boyd
    Jun 17, 2019

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

  • Sydney Doidge
    May 19, 2019

    A sobering, elegant look at rising waters, climate change, and how low lying areas and the vulnerable people who live in those areas are at risk. ...

    This is my favorite read of #scienceseptember so far. Rush, who I saw read at AWP this year, combines individual narratives with broader looks at communities confronting changes in shoreline because of climate change and human impact. Fascinating stuff from a rotting wetland in Maine t...

    Rising is a sobering and unflinching look at the impact of rising sea levels from the front lines--those coastal communities dealing with hurricanes, flooding and loss of property. What this book does best is bring the theoretical problem of climate change to the here and now. It isn't...

    This is my number one recommended read for climate change deniers. Part memoir, part history, part science article, and part empathetic interviews, Rising tells the story of climate change in this country. It is no longer a worry for the future. It is already here. U.S. citizens liv...

    Without question the most powerful account of climate change I've yet read, paying equal attention to human and nonhuman lives, race and class, geography and economics, emotion and reason. At times it echoes "Voices from Chernobyl" in letting the victims of coastal destruction bear wit...

    The best climate change book I've ever read. So much useful information but so personal and relevant to things that have already happened due to climate change! A must-read. ...

    This is an important book that should be read by all. It is not a dry, academic read, and you won?t find any textbook definitions of climate change or global warming here. Instead, this is a boots on the ground account of what is really happening out there in our world right now. And...

    Beautiful, beautiful writing about climate change and the ways it is currently affecting coastal communities, both human and non-human, in the US. Rush blends science, politics, nature writing, and history into a compelling narrative. The book is full of keen observations about nature ...

    Read my review in Earth Island Journal. http://www.earthisland.org/journal/in... ...

    Excellent book that covers sea level rise across the US, but largely from the perspective of the people who are affected. Rush includes the science of sea level rise and the changes in tidal marshes and other areas affected by the sea, but her real focus is on the people - usually marg...

    Didn't really like the style of writing, still had some interesting personal accounts of how rising waters have already altered many lives. ...

    The focus of this book overlaps with the scope of my professional life right now. Displacement, erosion, risk. Adaptation, resilience, relocation. Insurance, mortgage, capital. Catastrophe, death, extinction. Elizabeth Rush writes about dark themes impacting American coastal towns with...

    3.5 stars. I really loved lots of this book, liked a bit and disliked some. The observations about the disappearing coastline are troubling and, on their own, make this book worth reading. The author presents the science in a comprehensible and interesting way and the personal stor...

    I am in the minority here. This book has garnered a lot of praise, and almost won the Pulitzer. It is, as Elizabeth Kolbert's blurb on the back said, "by turns bleak and beautiful" but I'm less convinced that it's "a compelling piece of reporting," which was the first part of that blur...

    Elizabeth Rush deserves all of our love and money. She has written a book that encapsulates the intersection of a fascinating topic with incredibly important and influential moments in our life: homeowning, retirement, gentrification, sexual assault, climate grief, negligence, etc.. He...

    The subtitle's 'Dispatches' recalls war stories from the front lines. Elizabeth Rush delivers them beautifully here. She's a kind of investigative war correspondent who spent five years interviewing people, traveling from U.S. coast to coast to coast and sometimes back again, doing res...

    Poetic and very close to home. My house is at about 35 feet but it won't take much rise to change the surroundings drastically around us. Beautiful read. I see the marsh at the end of my street in a whole new light. "Like so many neighborhoods across America, this one is a poorly co...

    Really beautiful and lyrical. It rode a fine line between narrative and non fiction - at first I felt there may have been too much tangents but it all wove together well. Rush?s love for the coasts come out in many ways and I appreciated that she looked at more than just one aspect o...