Spooked!: How a Radio Broadcast and the War of the Worlds Sparked the 1938 Invasion of America

Spooked!: How a Radio Broadcast and the War of the Worlds Sparked the 1938 Invasion of America

Acclaimed author Gail Jarrow explores in riveting detail the famous War of the Worlds radio broadcast from 1938, in this nonfiction title. Jarrow highlights the artists behind the broadcast, the broadcast itself, the aftermath, and the repercussions which remain relevant today. On the night of October 30, 1938, thousands of Americans panicked when they believed that Martian Acclaimed author Gail Jarrow explores in riveting detail the famous War of the Worlds radio broadcast from 1938, in t...

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Title:Spooked!: How a Radio Broadcast and the War of the Worlds Sparked the 1938 Invasion of America
Author:Gail Jarrow
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:1629797766
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:144 pages pages

Spooked!: How a Radio Broadcast and the War of the Worlds Sparked the 1938 Invasion of America Reviews

  • Abby Johnson
    Aug 26, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

  • Alexa Hamilton
    Oct 11, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

  • Kathy
    Oct 04, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

  • Peg
    Oct 25, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

  • Angela
    Aug 16, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

  • Lynn
    Jun 26, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

  • Scott
    Oct 24, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

    Gail Jarrow does a wonderful job setting the stage, incorporating interesting facts and quotes, using historical photos and illustrations, conducting extensive research, and including a wealth of back matter. No surprise, this thrilling title received five star reviews and was publishe...

    A fantastic nonfiction middle grade book about the War of the Worlds radio broadcast in 1938 that caused some panic (but probably not as much as you thought). The author does a great job connecting the events back then to our interactions with media today. You should definitely read th...

    Somewhat repetitive, but still an interesting presentation of this topic. Coincidentally finished on the 80th anniversary of it's occurrence. This would make a great discussion starter for student conversations on the impact of media, historically and currently, as well as the histor...

    Jarrow tells the whole story of the broadcast, including the writer's challenges with shortening and updating a classic novel, the rehearsal process where the actors felt the show was going to be dumb and boring, and the production itself, choreographed by the masterful directing of yo...

    This book is well written and has many illustrations that support the text without interrupting the story. After reading this book, I wanted to listen to the original broadcast. The author included links which could be used to listen to the broadcast. There were also other references l...

    Very clever account of the War of the Worlds broadcast. It hooks you in thinking it is a story of the "mass hysteria" and reveals itself to be a thoughtful exploration of misinformation and gullibility of the public. ...

    Well now I want to listen to the radio play! ...

    Really interesting book about one of the first and most famous instances of "fake news" in American history. I loved all the quotes from listener letters; they read like modern-day tweets. ...

    Fascinating. A great book to share when introducing fake news. ...

    4.5 stars ...

    An informative look at the War of the Worlds broadcast in 1938 and the panic it caused. ...

  • Sharon Lawler
    Oct 20, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

  • Liz
    Nov 28, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

    Gail Jarrow does a wonderful job setting the stage, incorporating interesting facts and quotes, using historical photos and illustrations, conducting extensive research, and including a wealth of back matter. No surprise, this thrilling title received five star reviews and was publishe...

    A fantastic nonfiction middle grade book about the War of the Worlds radio broadcast in 1938 that caused some panic (but probably not as much as you thought). The author does a great job connecting the events back then to our interactions with media today. You should definitely read th...

    Somewhat repetitive, but still an interesting presentation of this topic. Coincidentally finished on the 80th anniversary of it's occurrence. This would make a great discussion starter for student conversations on the impact of media, historically and currently, as well as the histor...

    Jarrow tells the whole story of the broadcast, including the writer's challenges with shortening and updating a classic novel, the rehearsal process where the actors felt the show was going to be dumb and boring, and the production itself, choreographed by the masterful directing of yo...

    This book is well written and has many illustrations that support the text without interrupting the story. After reading this book, I wanted to listen to the original broadcast. The author included links which could be used to listen to the broadcast. There were also other references l...

    Very clever account of the War of the Worlds broadcast. It hooks you in thinking it is a story of the "mass hysteria" and reveals itself to be a thoughtful exploration of misinformation and gullibility of the public. ...

  • Karen Arendt
    Aug 26, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

    Gail Jarrow does a wonderful job setting the stage, incorporating interesting facts and quotes, using historical photos and illustrations, conducting extensive research, and including a wealth of back matter. No surprise, this thrilling title received five star reviews and was publishe...

    A fantastic nonfiction middle grade book about the War of the Worlds radio broadcast in 1938 that caused some panic (but probably not as much as you thought). The author does a great job connecting the events back then to our interactions with media today. You should definitely read th...

    Somewhat repetitive, but still an interesting presentation of this topic. Coincidentally finished on the 80th anniversary of it's occurrence. This would make a great discussion starter for student conversations on the impact of media, historically and currently, as well as the histor...

    Jarrow tells the whole story of the broadcast, including the writer's challenges with shortening and updating a classic novel, the rehearsal process where the actors felt the show was going to be dumb and boring, and the production itself, choreographed by the masterful directing of yo...

    This book is well written and has many illustrations that support the text without interrupting the story. After reading this book, I wanted to listen to the original broadcast. The author included links which could be used to listen to the broadcast. There were also other references l...

    Very clever account of the War of the Worlds broadcast. It hooks you in thinking it is a story of the "mass hysteria" and reveals itself to be a thoughtful exploration of misinformation and gullibility of the public. ...

    Well now I want to listen to the radio play! ...

    Really interesting book about one of the first and most famous instances of "fake news" in American history. I loved all the quotes from listener letters; they read like modern-day tweets. ...

    Fascinating. A great book to share when introducing fake news. ...

  • Lisa
    Dec 02, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

    Gail Jarrow does a wonderful job setting the stage, incorporating interesting facts and quotes, using historical photos and illustrations, conducting extensive research, and including a wealth of back matter. No surprise, this thrilling title received five star reviews and was publishe...

    A fantastic nonfiction middle grade book about the War of the Worlds radio broadcast in 1938 that caused some panic (but probably not as much as you thought). The author does a great job connecting the events back then to our interactions with media today. You should definitely read th...

    Somewhat repetitive, but still an interesting presentation of this topic. Coincidentally finished on the 80th anniversary of it's occurrence. This would make a great discussion starter for student conversations on the impact of media, historically and currently, as well as the histor...

    Jarrow tells the whole story of the broadcast, including the writer's challenges with shortening and updating a classic novel, the rehearsal process where the actors felt the show was going to be dumb and boring, and the production itself, choreographed by the masterful directing of yo...

  • Suzanne
    Sep 29, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

  • Sarai
    Oct 01, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

  • Ms. Yingling
    Aug 19, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

  • Hoover Public Library Kids and Teens
    Nov 07, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

  • Melinda
    Sep 15, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

  • Kris
    Oct 30, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

    Gail Jarrow does a wonderful job setting the stage, incorporating interesting facts and quotes, using historical photos and illustrations, conducting extensive research, and including a wealth of back matter. No surprise, this thrilling title received five star reviews and was publishe...

    A fantastic nonfiction middle grade book about the War of the Worlds radio broadcast in 1938 that caused some panic (but probably not as much as you thought). The author does a great job connecting the events back then to our interactions with media today. You should definitely read th...

    Somewhat repetitive, but still an interesting presentation of this topic. Coincidentally finished on the 80th anniversary of it's occurrence. This would make a great discussion starter for student conversations on the impact of media, historically and currently, as well as the histor...

  • Anne
    Sep 14, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

  • Betsy
    Sep 02, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

  • Jennifer
    Nov 18, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

    Gail Jarrow does a wonderful job setting the stage, incorporating interesting facts and quotes, using historical photos and illustrations, conducting extensive research, and including a wealth of back matter. No surprise, this thrilling title received five star reviews and was publishe...

    A fantastic nonfiction middle grade book about the War of the Worlds radio broadcast in 1938 that caused some panic (but probably not as much as you thought). The author does a great job connecting the events back then to our interactions with media today. You should definitely read th...

    Somewhat repetitive, but still an interesting presentation of this topic. Coincidentally finished on the 80th anniversary of it's occurrence. This would make a great discussion starter for student conversations on the impact of media, historically and currently, as well as the histor...

    Jarrow tells the whole story of the broadcast, including the writer's challenges with shortening and updating a classic novel, the rehearsal process where the actors felt the show was going to be dumb and boring, and the production itself, choreographed by the masterful directing of yo...

    This book is well written and has many illustrations that support the text without interrupting the story. After reading this book, I wanted to listen to the original broadcast. The author included links which could be used to listen to the broadcast. There were also other references l...

    Very clever account of the War of the Worlds broadcast. It hooks you in thinking it is a story of the "mass hysteria" and reveals itself to be a thoughtful exploration of misinformation and gullibility of the public. ...

    Well now I want to listen to the radio play! ...

    Really interesting book about one of the first and most famous instances of "fake news" in American history. I loved all the quotes from listener letters; they read like modern-day tweets. ...

  • Becky
    Oct 23, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

    Gail Jarrow does a wonderful job setting the stage, incorporating interesting facts and quotes, using historical photos and illustrations, conducting extensive research, and including a wealth of back matter. No surprise, this thrilling title received five star reviews and was publishe...

    A fantastic nonfiction middle grade book about the War of the Worlds radio broadcast in 1938 that caused some panic (but probably not as much as you thought). The author does a great job connecting the events back then to our interactions with media today. You should definitely read th...

    Somewhat repetitive, but still an interesting presentation of this topic. Coincidentally finished on the 80th anniversary of it's occurrence. This would make a great discussion starter for student conversations on the impact of media, historically and currently, as well as the histor...

    Jarrow tells the whole story of the broadcast, including the writer's challenges with shortening and updating a classic novel, the rehearsal process where the actors felt the show was going to be dumb and boring, and the production itself, choreographed by the masterful directing of yo...

    This book is well written and has many illustrations that support the text without interrupting the story. After reading this book, I wanted to listen to the original broadcast. The author included links which could be used to listen to the broadcast. There were also other references l...

    Very clever account of the War of the Worlds broadcast. It hooks you in thinking it is a story of the "mass hysteria" and reveals itself to be a thoughtful exploration of misinformation and gullibility of the public. ...

    Well now I want to listen to the radio play! ...

    Really interesting book about one of the first and most famous instances of "fake news" in American history. I loved all the quotes from listener letters; they read like modern-day tweets. ...

    Fascinating. A great book to share when introducing fake news. ...

    4.5 stars ...

  • Kaitlyn
    Aug 29, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

    Gail Jarrow does a wonderful job setting the stage, incorporating interesting facts and quotes, using historical photos and illustrations, conducting extensive research, and including a wealth of back matter. No surprise, this thrilling title received five star reviews and was publishe...

    A fantastic nonfiction middle grade book about the War of the Worlds radio broadcast in 1938 that caused some panic (but probably not as much as you thought). The author does a great job connecting the events back then to our interactions with media today. You should definitely read th...

    Somewhat repetitive, but still an interesting presentation of this topic. Coincidentally finished on the 80th anniversary of it's occurrence. This would make a great discussion starter for student conversations on the impact of media, historically and currently, as well as the histor...

    Jarrow tells the whole story of the broadcast, including the writer's challenges with shortening and updating a classic novel, the rehearsal process where the actors felt the show was going to be dumb and boring, and the production itself, choreographed by the masterful directing of yo...

    This book is well written and has many illustrations that support the text without interrupting the story. After reading this book, I wanted to listen to the original broadcast. The author included links which could be used to listen to the broadcast. There were also other references l...

    Very clever account of the War of the Worlds broadcast. It hooks you in thinking it is a story of the "mass hysteria" and reveals itself to be a thoughtful exploration of misinformation and gullibility of the public. ...

    Well now I want to listen to the radio play! ...

  • Jennifer Eckert
    Sep 09, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

    Gail Jarrow does a wonderful job setting the stage, incorporating interesting facts and quotes, using historical photos and illustrations, conducting extensive research, and including a wealth of back matter. No surprise, this thrilling title received five star reviews and was publishe...

    A fantastic nonfiction middle grade book about the War of the Worlds radio broadcast in 1938 that caused some panic (but probably not as much as you thought). The author does a great job connecting the events back then to our interactions with media today. You should definitely read th...

  • Pam
    Nov 06, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

    Gail Jarrow does a wonderful job setting the stage, incorporating interesting facts and quotes, using historical photos and illustrations, conducting extensive research, and including a wealth of back matter. No surprise, this thrilling title received five star reviews and was publishe...

    A fantastic nonfiction middle grade book about the War of the Worlds radio broadcast in 1938 that caused some panic (but probably not as much as you thought). The author does a great job connecting the events back then to our interactions with media today. You should definitely read th...

    Somewhat repetitive, but still an interesting presentation of this topic. Coincidentally finished on the 80th anniversary of it's occurrence. This would make a great discussion starter for student conversations on the impact of media, historically and currently, as well as the histor...

    Jarrow tells the whole story of the broadcast, including the writer's challenges with shortening and updating a classic novel, the rehearsal process where the actors felt the show was going to be dumb and boring, and the production itself, choreographed by the masterful directing of yo...

    This book is well written and has many illustrations that support the text without interrupting the story. After reading this book, I wanted to listen to the original broadcast. The author included links which could be used to listen to the broadcast. There were also other references l...

    Very clever account of the War of the Worlds broadcast. It hooks you in thinking it is a story of the "mass hysteria" and reveals itself to be a thoughtful exploration of misinformation and gullibility of the public. ...

    Well now I want to listen to the radio play! ...

    Really interesting book about one of the first and most famous instances of "fake news" in American history. I loved all the quotes from listener letters; they read like modern-day tweets. ...

    Fascinating. A great book to share when introducing fake news. ...

    4.5 stars ...

    An informative look at the War of the Worlds broadcast in 1938 and the panic it caused. ...

    Book is factual and repetitive. Could be a little shorter. Fun read ...

  • Tara
    Nov 02, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

  • Joan Marie
    Sep 15, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

    Gail Jarrow does a wonderful job setting the stage, incorporating interesting facts and quotes, using historical photos and illustrations, conducting extensive research, and including a wealth of back matter. No surprise, this thrilling title received five star reviews and was publishe...

  • Jennifer
    Nov 14, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

    It seems, looking back into the dim recesses of the past, that a language arts teacher played the recording of the Orson Welles radio broadcast for us in class at some point. If you haven't heard it yet, you can find it online in a variety of places from YouTube to Audible. But what Ga...

    I read this flying home from the ALA conference, the new hard copy clutched protectively through all the bounces, take-offs and landings and it took me right into the 1938 broadcast that set the world talking. This book couldn't be more timely as it depicts the original fake news event...

    Wonderfully researched title that explores the story and personalities behind the October 30, 1938 radio broadcast based on the HG Wells novel, "The War of the Worlds". The reader is taken through the creation of the radio based Mercury Theater by Orson Welles and John Houseman, to the...

    This book purports to be about the 1938 radio broadcast of War of the Worlds, which caused panic among many as they thought it was really happening. It's really about fake news. But it also covers many other topics, including WWII, science, hoaxes, information about the people involved...

    I love Gail Jarrow's books. I've always been fascinated with the War of Worlds broadcast and the reaction it provoked at the time. But unfortunately, you have to be fascinated with this broadcast to understand the book the way it's set up--or at least you have to know that the invasion...

    Just a fantastic accounting of the War of the Worlds broadcast in October 1938 and its consequences. Jarrow has thoroughly researched her topic and includes information on all the clues that should have made it clear to listeners that this was not a real event - if they were paying att...

    A very topical discussion of what we would now call fake news back in the days of radio. Orson Welles and his team didn't set out to cause such a reaction, they were just trying to produce an exciting radio drama and weren't even convinced it would be very good at that. Of course, we'v...

    Engaging text about the famed radio broadcast. Includes lots of good background information about the social and political situations as well as influence of radio on people?s lives. Jarrow uses lots of quotes, especially about reactions to the broadcast. There is good use of photos ...

    Excellent. In light of the daily barrage of Tweets coming out of the White House, this book talks about REAL "fake news", specifically about the myth of mass-hysteria after listening to the broadcast of the War of the World by Orson Wells, et al. I learned a lot and enjoyed reading thi...

    I'm not sure about the wide-spread appeal of this one. The writing, however does a great job of conveying how this situation happened. I liked the connections made to fake news and the political climate in 1938 that led to people believing the radio broadcast. The pictures will be appe...

    I raced through the account of creating and broadcasting the War of the Worlds but stalled a bit on the fallout. Still, this is very very well done YA NF. The photographs and illustrations are well chosen and perfectly placed. The relevance to our times carefully drawn and it?s a gre...

    Gail Jarrow does a wonderful job setting the stage, incorporating interesting facts and quotes, using historical photos and illustrations, conducting extensive research, and including a wealth of back matter. No surprise, this thrilling title received five star reviews and was publishe...

    A fantastic nonfiction middle grade book about the War of the Worlds radio broadcast in 1938 that caused some panic (but probably not as much as you thought). The author does a great job connecting the events back then to our interactions with media today. You should definitely read th...

    Somewhat repetitive, but still an interesting presentation of this topic. Coincidentally finished on the 80th anniversary of it's occurrence. This would make a great discussion starter for student conversations on the impact of media, historically and currently, as well as the histor...

    Jarrow tells the whole story of the broadcast, including the writer's challenges with shortening and updating a classic novel, the rehearsal process where the actors felt the show was going to be dumb and boring, and the production itself, choreographed by the masterful directing of yo...

    This book is well written and has many illustrations that support the text without interrupting the story. After reading this book, I wanted to listen to the original broadcast. The author included links which could be used to listen to the broadcast. There were also other references l...

  • Lilyn G. | Sci-Fi & Scary
    Sep 12, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

  • Kyra Nay
    Sep 05, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...

    Jarrow sets the stage perfectly in this detailed, illuminating exploration of why ordinary Americans panicked when they heard a broadcast of New Jersey being invaded by Martians on Oct. 30, 1938. This was my official read for Halloween 2018. ...

    So interesting and timely! Middle grade nonfiction always feels like it's written riiiiiiiiight at the right level for me to understand. ...

    In an age where false, misleading, and fear-mongering information spreads like wildfire over social media networks, often garnering more clicks, likes, and shares than trustworthy or verified information, the story of the infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast seems eerily familiar...

  • Claudia
    Oct 26, 2018

    Gail Jarrow, I love you so. This is a fantastic and timely account of the 1938 radio dramatization of The War of the Worlds that sparked panic in many listeners. Hand this to anyone concerned about ?fake news? or anyone who rolls their eyes upon hearing that phrase. ...

    Review to come soon. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publicity company for review consideration ...

    Copy provided by the publisher In these days of "fake news", this overview of the 1930s radio scene and the specific event of the broadcast of The War of the Worlds is both timely and fascinating. Starting with the adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel to radio and details of what it ...

    This is for the youthful reader relaying the 1938 radio broadcast of the War of the Worlds by Orson Wells, and the Mercury Theater which panicked the American people. Lavish with photos of the actors and illustration reproductions from the 1906 edition of War of the Worlds as well a...