Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World

Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World

An insider's groundbreaking investigation of how the global elite's efforts to "change the world" preserve the status quo and obscure their role in causing the problems they later seek to solve. Former New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas takes us into the inner sanctums of a new gilded age, where the rich and powerful fight for equality and justice any way they can- An insider's groundbreaking investigation of how the global elite's efforts to "change the world" preserve the status...

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Title:Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World
Author:Anand Giridharadas
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0451493249
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:288 pages pages

Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World Reviews

  • Michael Siliski
    Jan 31, 2019

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

    Incisive, hard-hitting critique on philanthrocapitalism full of sarcasm, humour and a ton of food for thought. The author very clearly lays out his privileges, insider-outsider status and unpacks the whole 'i want to save the world' charade that elite across the world are engaged in. I...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    Winners Take All (2018) Anand Giridhardas People who are making money at the expense of the common good are not ignorant about the effects they are having on the world around them. Take as an example ? the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, built by the widow who was the h...

    To take on the philanthropists of the world, accusing them of being part of a charade, takes some nerve. Giridhardas, a former New York Times Columnist and author, appears to have this in plenty. The fireworks start from the title, through to the opening quote from Leo Tolstoy. ?...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    Recommended if you?re angry at liberal elites and want to lean into that anger with some anecdotes and an uncomplicated narrative. Winners Take All tells the story of how a new elite of market-oriented, globe-trotting philanthropists have convinced themselves and the rest of us th...

  • Bill  Kerwin
    Oct 20, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

  • Trevor
    Sep 23, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

  • Mehrsa
    Aug 31, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

  • Meredith
    Sep 15, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

  • Emily
    Dec 28, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

  • Thomas
    May 20, 2019

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

  • David
    Jan 25, 2019

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

    Incisive, hard-hitting critique on philanthrocapitalism full of sarcasm, humour and a ton of food for thought. The author very clearly lays out his privileges, insider-outsider status and unpacks the whole 'i want to save the world' charade that elite across the world are engaged in. I...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    Winners Take All (2018) Anand Giridhardas People who are making money at the expense of the common good are not ignorant about the effects they are having on the world around them. Take as an example ? the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, built by the widow who was the h...

    To take on the philanthropists of the world, accusing them of being part of a charade, takes some nerve. Giridhardas, a former New York Times Columnist and author, appears to have this in plenty. The fireworks start from the title, through to the opening quote from Leo Tolstoy. ?...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    Recommended if you?re angry at liberal elites and want to lean into that anger with some anecdotes and an uncomplicated narrative. Winners Take All tells the story of how a new elite of market-oriented, globe-trotting philanthropists have convinced themselves and the rest of us th...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    111th book for 2018. We used to have public intellectuals, now we have thought leaders. Intellectuals wrote books with difficult truths that people didn't like; thought leaders give empowering talks at Davos and TED. If this sounds too hard, consider that "social inequality" is a...

    4.5 Woah I really really want to talk to other people about this book! *insert mind blown emoji* ...

    After I wrote a tepid review of a book which covers similar ground as this one, someone recommended this book as a superior treatment of the topic. This book is far superior because it diagnoses the same worldwide problems without a lot of studied outrage and tedious name-calling. I'm ...

  • Steve Turtell
    Sep 06, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

    Incisive, hard-hitting critique on philanthrocapitalism full of sarcasm, humour and a ton of food for thought. The author very clearly lays out his privileges, insider-outsider status and unpacks the whole 'i want to save the world' charade that elite across the world are engaged in. I...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

  • Nils
    May 12, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

  • Jenn "JR"
    Feb 16, 2019

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

    Incisive, hard-hitting critique on philanthrocapitalism full of sarcasm, humour and a ton of food for thought. The author very clearly lays out his privileges, insider-outsider status and unpacks the whole 'i want to save the world' charade that elite across the world are engaged in. I...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    Winners Take All (2018) Anand Giridhardas People who are making money at the expense of the common good are not ignorant about the effects they are having on the world around them. Take as an example ? the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, built by the widow who was the h...

  • Sonya Dutta Choudhury
    Jan 18, 2019

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

    Incisive, hard-hitting critique on philanthrocapitalism full of sarcasm, humour and a ton of food for thought. The author very clearly lays out his privileges, insider-outsider status and unpacks the whole 'i want to save the world' charade that elite across the world are engaged in. I...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    Winners Take All (2018) Anand Giridhardas People who are making money at the expense of the common good are not ignorant about the effects they are having on the world around them. Take as an example ? the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, built by the widow who was the h...

    To take on the philanthropists of the world, accusing them of being part of a charade, takes some nerve. Giridhardas, a former New York Times Columnist and author, appears to have this in plenty. The fireworks start from the title, through to the opening quote from Leo Tolstoy. ?...

  • Jason Furman
    Mar 16, 2019

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

  • Dolly
    Nov 17, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

  • Paula Lyle
    Sep 10, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

    Incisive, hard-hitting critique on philanthrocapitalism full of sarcasm, humour and a ton of food for thought. The author very clearly lays out his privileges, insider-outsider status and unpacks the whole 'i want to save the world' charade that elite across the world are engaged in. I...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    Winners Take All (2018) Anand Giridhardas People who are making money at the expense of the common good are not ignorant about the effects they are having on the world around them. Take as an example ? the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, built by the widow who was the h...

    To take on the philanthropists of the world, accusing them of being part of a charade, takes some nerve. Giridhardas, a former New York Times Columnist and author, appears to have this in plenty. The fireworks start from the title, through to the opening quote from Leo Tolstoy. ?...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    Recommended if you?re angry at liberal elites and want to lean into that anger with some anecdotes and an uncomplicated narrative. Winners Take All tells the story of how a new elite of market-oriented, globe-trotting philanthropists have convinced themselves and the rest of us th...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

  • Hamsini
    Feb 13, 2019

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

    Incisive, hard-hitting critique on philanthrocapitalism full of sarcasm, humour and a ton of food for thought. The author very clearly lays out his privileges, insider-outsider status and unpacks the whole 'i want to save the world' charade that elite across the world are engaged in. I...

  • Linh
    Sep 14, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

  • Darnell
    Oct 19, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

  • Michael Perkins
    Nov 01, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

  • Dan Connors
    Sep 24, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

  • Peter Mcloughlin
    Nov 21, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

  • BlackOxford
    Nov 05, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

  • Radiantflux
    Dec 01, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

    Incisive, hard-hitting critique on philanthrocapitalism full of sarcasm, humour and a ton of food for thought. The author very clearly lays out his privileges, insider-outsider status and unpacks the whole 'i want to save the world' charade that elite across the world are engaged in. I...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    Winners Take All (2018) Anand Giridhardas People who are making money at the expense of the common good are not ignorant about the effects they are having on the world around them. Take as an example ? the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, built by the widow who was the h...

    To take on the philanthropists of the world, accusing them of being part of a charade, takes some nerve. Giridhardas, a former New York Times Columnist and author, appears to have this in plenty. The fireworks start from the title, through to the opening quote from Leo Tolstoy. ?...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    Recommended if you?re angry at liberal elites and want to lean into that anger with some anecdotes and an uncomplicated narrative. Winners Take All tells the story of how a new elite of market-oriented, globe-trotting philanthropists have convinced themselves and the rest of us th...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    111th book for 2018. We used to have public intellectuals, now we have thought leaders. Intellectuals wrote books with difficult truths that people didn't like; thought leaders give empowering talks at Davos and TED. If this sounds too hard, consider that "social inequality" is a...

  • John Spiller
    Sep 06, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

    Incisive, hard-hitting critique on philanthrocapitalism full of sarcasm, humour and a ton of food for thought. The author very clearly lays out his privileges, insider-outsider status and unpacks the whole 'i want to save the world' charade that elite across the world are engaged in. I...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    Winners Take All (2018) Anand Giridhardas People who are making money at the expense of the common good are not ignorant about the effects they are having on the world around them. Take as an example ? the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, built by the widow who was the h...

    To take on the philanthropists of the world, accusing them of being part of a charade, takes some nerve. Giridhardas, a former New York Times Columnist and author, appears to have this in plenty. The fireworks start from the title, through to the opening quote from Leo Tolstoy. ?...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

  • Kelly
    Feb 25, 2019

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

    Incisive, hard-hitting critique on philanthrocapitalism full of sarcasm, humour and a ton of food for thought. The author very clearly lays out his privileges, insider-outsider status and unpacks the whole 'i want to save the world' charade that elite across the world are engaged in. I...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    Winners Take All (2018) Anand Giridhardas People who are making money at the expense of the common good are not ignorant about the effects they are having on the world around them. Take as an example ? the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, built by the widow who was the h...

    To take on the philanthropists of the world, accusing them of being part of a charade, takes some nerve. Giridhardas, a former New York Times Columnist and author, appears to have this in plenty. The fireworks start from the title, through to the opening quote from Leo Tolstoy. ?...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    Recommended if you?re angry at liberal elites and want to lean into that anger with some anecdotes and an uncomplicated narrative. Winners Take All tells the story of how a new elite of market-oriented, globe-trotting philanthropists have convinced themselves and the rest of us th...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

    111th book for 2018. We used to have public intellectuals, now we have thought leaders. Intellectuals wrote books with difficult truths that people didn't like; thought leaders give empowering talks at Davos and TED. If this sounds too hard, consider that "social inequality" is a...

    4.5 Woah I really really want to talk to other people about this book! *insert mind blown emoji* ...

  • Wendy Liu
    Jan 26, 2019

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

  • Michael Tackett
    Sep 14, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

    Incisive, hard-hitting critique on philanthrocapitalism full of sarcasm, humour and a ton of food for thought. The author very clearly lays out his privileges, insider-outsider status and unpacks the whole 'i want to save the world' charade that elite across the world are engaged in. I...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    Winners Take All (2018) Anand Giridhardas People who are making money at the expense of the common good are not ignorant about the effects they are having on the world around them. Take as an example ? the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, built by the widow who was the h...

    To take on the philanthropists of the world, accusing them of being part of a charade, takes some nerve. Giridhardas, a former New York Times Columnist and author, appears to have this in plenty. The fireworks start from the title, through to the opening quote from Leo Tolstoy. ?...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    Recommended if you?re angry at liberal elites and want to lean into that anger with some anecdotes and an uncomplicated narrative. Winners Take All tells the story of how a new elite of market-oriented, globe-trotting philanthropists have convinced themselves and the rest of us th...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

  • David Wunderlich
    Oct 23, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...

    I enjoyed reading about this topic in the New Yorker and am sympathetic to the author's view of things. But the beginning of this book was so relentlessly repetitious that I couldn't carry on reading it. I felt that it went beyond "not my taste" to "where is your editor?". ...

    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...

    on point synopsis by Masha Gessen from The New Yorker.... Anand Giridharadas takes on the ethos of ?doing good by doing well?: the feel-good ideology that enables people who think of themselves as good, principled, politically aware, and even woke to contribute to?and benefit ...

    Incisive, hard-hitting critique on philanthrocapitalism full of sarcasm, humour and a ton of food for thought. The author very clearly lays out his privileges, insider-outsider status and unpacks the whole 'i want to save the world' charade that elite across the world are engaged in. I...

    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...

    Winners Take All (2018) Anand Giridhardas People who are making money at the expense of the common good are not ignorant about the effects they are having on the world around them. Take as an example ? the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, built by the widow who was the h...

    To take on the philanthropists of the world, accusing them of being part of a charade, takes some nerve. Giridhardas, a former New York Times Columnist and author, appears to have this in plenty. The fireworks start from the title, through to the opening quote from Leo Tolstoy. ?...

    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...

    Recommended if you?re angry at liberal elites and want to lean into that anger with some anecdotes and an uncomplicated narrative. Winners Take All tells the story of how a new elite of market-oriented, globe-trotting philanthropists have convinced themselves and the rest of us th...

    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...

    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...

    The author crystallizes a good critique and rebuke of the intellectual elite classes, though he waits until the acknowledgements to, well, acknowledge a fuller extent of how much he was part of the problem and to an extent still is. It?s evident elsewhere anyway, as he only menti...

  • Cesar
    Sep 30, 2018

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

  • Marks54
    Apr 27, 2019

    What Trump and Idealists Have in Common ?Making a difference? could be the idealistic theme of my generation?s collective ethos - at least among those of us who survived the drug-culture of the 60?s and 70?s with intact minds. The world had been opened to us by cheap acces...

    Did you watch Zuckerberg testify before the Senate committees about Facebook and the 2018 election? Were you struck by how blithely unrepentant he seemed, how convinced that his titanic, poorly monitored data base?which he habitually describes as ?a community??is an unalloyed...

    An excellent exposť of the wealthy and powerful who aim to do "good" and just perpetuate systems of injustice. Anand Giridharadas creates a compelling argument about how elites who work at corporations and companies like McKinsey and Goldman Sachs say they "work for social change," ye...

    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...

    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...

    Before you read this book, read the author?s bio. For someone who is so critical of elites hiding in their hobbit holes, he waits until the acknowledgments section at the end to let you know that he is one of them. I found this incredibly bizarre. He says the reason is because he did...

    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...

    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...

    Very mixed feelings about this book. I liked some parts too much to give a low rating, disliked other parts too much to give a high rating, and don't feel those should average out. While I was reading, I was considering a criticism that this book is ultimately not engaged in critica...

    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...

    Very much in the tradition of Thomas Frank and the Baffler Magazine. This lampoons the TED talking Thought leaders and Elon Musks hanging around Davos and Martha's Vineyard. You know the plutocrats on a mission to save us all. I don't know if they do it the avoid scrutiny or salve thei...

    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...

    so good! an insider look at the moral bankruptcy of philanthrocapitalism. very accessible but still riveting. highly recommended ...

    I am very glad that ?Winners Take All? was written and that it is being widely read in precisely the circles that need to read it. I could see it actually making the world a better place. A lot of the reportage is excellent, in many ways looking from multiple perspectives, being as...

    This is a fairly effective trade book on political economy, globalism, elites, consultants, and philanthropy. It is effective because it ties together a bunch of related ideas under a broader and persuasive story. That story is about a class of business activities that can be viewed wi...