Harbor Me

Harbor Me

Jacqueline Woodson's first middle-grade novel since National Book Award winner Brown Girl Dreaming celebrates the healing that can occur when a group of students share their stories. It all starts when six kids have to meet for a weekly chat?by themselves, with no adults to listen in. There, in the room they soon dub the ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), they discover Jacqueline Woodson's first middle-grade novel since National Book Award winner Brown Girl Dreaming celebrates the h...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Harbor Me
Author:Jacqueline Woodson
Rating:
Genres:Childrens
ISBN:0399252525
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:192 pages pages

Harbor Me Reviews

  • Jessica
    Sep 26, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

  • Betsy
    Jun 20, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

  • Mary Lee
    Jul 21, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

  • Desiree
    Sep 26, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

    Jacqueline Woodson is a treasure and I would read anything she wrote, in any form, for any age group. I'm surprised that I haven't heard more about this book, because it's focus on kids and diversity and current events is so well done. The audiobook performance is so good too! Don't mi...

    This was a short accessible read that touched on a lot of issues. Loss of a parent, immigration, racial profiling, and then there's the kiddo that hasn't experienced any of that, but sees how life can be cruel to his friends, and that effects him as well. Its a good one for all kids, w...

    I listened to the audiobook and it was extra special ... Jacqueline Woodson read Ms Laverne and her some reads one of the child characters... and they do the sweetest interview at the end. This is an important book for all to read ... and I wish felt as safe as these kiddos do in th...

    Not much to do on this rainy day but to read an amazing book! So many wonderful images and messages in this book! ...

    I absolutely love the idea of being a safe harbor for someone. As a librarian, I believe that libraries are safe harbors. The students in this story battled their own perception of themselves and each other to create a unique safe harbor. Each character had such rich complexity! I abso...

  • Lynn
    Oct 17, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

    Jacqueline Woodson is a treasure and I would read anything she wrote, in any form, for any age group. I'm surprised that I haven't heard more about this book, because it's focus on kids and diversity and current events is so well done. The audiobook performance is so good too! Don't mi...

    This was a short accessible read that touched on a lot of issues. Loss of a parent, immigration, racial profiling, and then there's the kiddo that hasn't experienced any of that, but sees how life can be cruel to his friends, and that effects him as well. Its a good one for all kids, w...

    I listened to the audiobook and it was extra special ... Jacqueline Woodson read Ms Laverne and her some reads one of the child characters... and they do the sweetest interview at the end. This is an important book for all to read ... and I wish felt as safe as these kiddos do in th...

    Not much to do on this rainy day but to read an amazing book! So many wonderful images and messages in this book! ...

    I absolutely love the idea of being a safe harbor for someone. As a librarian, I believe that libraries are safe harbors. The students in this story battled their own perception of themselves and each other to create a unique safe harbor. Each character had such rich complexity! I abso...

    Can't wait till my boys are old enough to read this kinds of books together - great for discussion. Especially in this current climate. ...

    Richie?s Picks: HARBOR ME by Jacqueline Woodson, Nancy Paulsen Books, August 2018, 192p., ISBN: 978-0-399-25252-5 ?Such a situation could have long-term, devastating effects on young children, who are likely to develop what is called toxic stress in their brain once separated fr...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s gift of words trick us into thinking the poetry oozing out of its pages at every turn magically appear, that we, too, can wield a mighty pen like a laden paintbrush and produce a masterpiece. Don?t be fooled, dear reader. That is why she is who she is, and we a...

    Rating: 4.75 stars Before the 2016 Newbery Medal winners were announced, I read a comment that stated something to the effect that the world belonged to Jacqueline Woodson, and we were all just being pulled along in the wake of her genius. I looked for the exact quote, but couldn't ...

    Harbor Me is so beautifully written that if it receives all the 2018-2019 children's literature accolades I'm assuming it will receive, I will have no qualms about it. Its message is a strong and relevant one, being dished out by one of children's literature's best authors. What kep...

    This offering from Woodson did not grab me like Brown Girl Dreaming but it is a very good book nonetheless. BGD took me back to my childhood and made me sentimental but Harbor Me seems like a more important book. Both are targeted to middle grade readers but have crossover appeal to ad...

    Jacqueline Woodson is an American treasure. Every word of every sentence was perfect in this slim but deeply moving book. All the stars and more for this one. 6 memorable characters dealing with bullying, academic issues, family issues, life-altering changes occurring in their lives an...

  • DaNae
    Sep 15, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

  • Richie Partington
    Jun 18, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

    Jacqueline Woodson is a treasure and I would read anything she wrote, in any form, for any age group. I'm surprised that I haven't heard more about this book, because it's focus on kids and diversity and current events is so well done. The audiobook performance is so good too! Don't mi...

    This was a short accessible read that touched on a lot of issues. Loss of a parent, immigration, racial profiling, and then there's the kiddo that hasn't experienced any of that, but sees how life can be cruel to his friends, and that effects him as well. Its a good one for all kids, w...

    I listened to the audiobook and it was extra special ... Jacqueline Woodson read Ms Laverne and her some reads one of the child characters... and they do the sweetest interview at the end. This is an important book for all to read ... and I wish felt as safe as these kiddos do in th...

    Not much to do on this rainy day but to read an amazing book! So many wonderful images and messages in this book! ...

    I absolutely love the idea of being a safe harbor for someone. As a librarian, I believe that libraries are safe harbors. The students in this story battled their own perception of themselves and each other to create a unique safe harbor. Each character had such rich complexity! I abso...

    Can't wait till my boys are old enough to read this kinds of books together - great for discussion. Especially in this current climate. ...

    Richie?s Picks: HARBOR ME by Jacqueline Woodson, Nancy Paulsen Books, August 2018, 192p., ISBN: 978-0-399-25252-5 ?Such a situation could have long-term, devastating effects on young children, who are likely to develop what is called toxic stress in their brain once separated fr...

  • Laurie Halse  Anderson
    Sep 01, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

  • Janet
    Sep 30, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

    Jacqueline Woodson is a treasure and I would read anything she wrote, in any form, for any age group. I'm surprised that I haven't heard more about this book, because it's focus on kids and diversity and current events is so well done. The audiobook performance is so good too! Don't mi...

    This was a short accessible read that touched on a lot of issues. Loss of a parent, immigration, racial profiling, and then there's the kiddo that hasn't experienced any of that, but sees how life can be cruel to his friends, and that effects him as well. Its a good one for all kids, w...

    I listened to the audiobook and it was extra special ... Jacqueline Woodson read Ms Laverne and her some reads one of the child characters... and they do the sweetest interview at the end. This is an important book for all to read ... and I wish felt as safe as these kiddos do in th...

    Not much to do on this rainy day but to read an amazing book! So many wonderful images and messages in this book! ...

    I absolutely love the idea of being a safe harbor for someone. As a librarian, I believe that libraries are safe harbors. The students in this story battled their own perception of themselves and each other to create a unique safe harbor. Each character had such rich complexity! I abso...

    Can't wait till my boys are old enough to read this kinds of books together - great for discussion. Especially in this current climate. ...

    Richie?s Picks: HARBOR ME by Jacqueline Woodson, Nancy Paulsen Books, August 2018, 192p., ISBN: 978-0-399-25252-5 ?Such a situation could have long-term, devastating effects on young children, who are likely to develop what is called toxic stress in their brain once separated fr...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s gift of words trick us into thinking the poetry oozing out of its pages at every turn magically appear, that we, too, can wield a mighty pen like a laden paintbrush and produce a masterpiece. Don?t be fooled, dear reader. That is why she is who she is, and we a...

    Rating: 4.75 stars Before the 2016 Newbery Medal winners were announced, I read a comment that stated something to the effect that the world belonged to Jacqueline Woodson, and we were all just being pulled along in the wake of her genius. I looked for the exact quote, but couldn't ...

    Harbor Me is so beautifully written that if it receives all the 2018-2019 children's literature accolades I'm assuming it will receive, I will have no qualms about it. Its message is a strong and relevant one, being dished out by one of children's literature's best authors. What kep...

    This offering from Woodson did not grab me like Brown Girl Dreaming but it is a very good book nonetheless. BGD took me back to my childhood and made me sentimental but Harbor Me seems like a more important book. Both are targeted to middle grade readers but have crossover appeal to ad...

  • The Reading Countess
    May 28, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

    Jacqueline Woodson is a treasure and I would read anything she wrote, in any form, for any age group. I'm surprised that I haven't heard more about this book, because it's focus on kids and diversity and current events is so well done. The audiobook performance is so good too! Don't mi...

    This was a short accessible read that touched on a lot of issues. Loss of a parent, immigration, racial profiling, and then there's the kiddo that hasn't experienced any of that, but sees how life can be cruel to his friends, and that effects him as well. Its a good one for all kids, w...

    I listened to the audiobook and it was extra special ... Jacqueline Woodson read Ms Laverne and her some reads one of the child characters... and they do the sweetest interview at the end. This is an important book for all to read ... and I wish felt as safe as these kiddos do in th...

    Not much to do on this rainy day but to read an amazing book! So many wonderful images and messages in this book! ...

    I absolutely love the idea of being a safe harbor for someone. As a librarian, I believe that libraries are safe harbors. The students in this story battled their own perception of themselves and each other to create a unique safe harbor. Each character had such rich complexity! I abso...

    Can't wait till my boys are old enough to read this kinds of books together - great for discussion. Especially in this current climate. ...

    Richie?s Picks: HARBOR ME by Jacqueline Woodson, Nancy Paulsen Books, August 2018, 192p., ISBN: 978-0-399-25252-5 ?Such a situation could have long-term, devastating effects on young children, who are likely to develop what is called toxic stress in their brain once separated fr...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s gift of words trick us into thinking the poetry oozing out of its pages at every turn magically appear, that we, too, can wield a mighty pen like a laden paintbrush and produce a masterpiece. Don?t be fooled, dear reader. That is why she is who she is, and we a...

  • Cindy
    Sep 28, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

    Jacqueline Woodson is a treasure and I would read anything she wrote, in any form, for any age group. I'm surprised that I haven't heard more about this book, because it's focus on kids and diversity and current events is so well done. The audiobook performance is so good too! Don't mi...

    This was a short accessible read that touched on a lot of issues. Loss of a parent, immigration, racial profiling, and then there's the kiddo that hasn't experienced any of that, but sees how life can be cruel to his friends, and that effects him as well. Its a good one for all kids, w...

    I listened to the audiobook and it was extra special ... Jacqueline Woodson read Ms Laverne and her some reads one of the child characters... and they do the sweetest interview at the end. This is an important book for all to read ... and I wish felt as safe as these kiddos do in th...

    Not much to do on this rainy day but to read an amazing book! So many wonderful images and messages in this book! ...

    I absolutely love the idea of being a safe harbor for someone. As a librarian, I believe that libraries are safe harbors. The students in this story battled their own perception of themselves and each other to create a unique safe harbor. Each character had such rich complexity! I abso...

    Can't wait till my boys are old enough to read this kinds of books together - great for discussion. Especially in this current climate. ...

    Richie?s Picks: HARBOR ME by Jacqueline Woodson, Nancy Paulsen Books, August 2018, 192p., ISBN: 978-0-399-25252-5 ?Such a situation could have long-term, devastating effects on young children, who are likely to develop what is called toxic stress in their brain once separated fr...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s gift of words trick us into thinking the poetry oozing out of its pages at every turn magically appear, that we, too, can wield a mighty pen like a laden paintbrush and produce a masterpiece. Don?t be fooled, dear reader. That is why she is who she is, and we a...

    Rating: 4.75 stars Before the 2016 Newbery Medal winners were announced, I read a comment that stated something to the effect that the world belonged to Jacqueline Woodson, and we were all just being pulled along in the wake of her genius. I looked for the exact quote, but couldn't ...

  • Gary Anderson
    Sep 12, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

  • Michelle
    Sep 11, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

    Jacqueline Woodson is a treasure and I would read anything she wrote, in any form, for any age group. I'm surprised that I haven't heard more about this book, because it's focus on kids and diversity and current events is so well done. The audiobook performance is so good too! Don't mi...

    This was a short accessible read that touched on a lot of issues. Loss of a parent, immigration, racial profiling, and then there's the kiddo that hasn't experienced any of that, but sees how life can be cruel to his friends, and that effects him as well. Its a good one for all kids, w...

  • Jordan Henrichs
    Oct 08, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

    Jacqueline Woodson is a treasure and I would read anything she wrote, in any form, for any age group. I'm surprised that I haven't heard more about this book, because it's focus on kids and diversity and current events is so well done. The audiobook performance is so good too! Don't mi...

    This was a short accessible read that touched on a lot of issues. Loss of a parent, immigration, racial profiling, and then there's the kiddo that hasn't experienced any of that, but sees how life can be cruel to his friends, and that effects him as well. Its a good one for all kids, w...

    I listened to the audiobook and it was extra special ... Jacqueline Woodson read Ms Laverne and her some reads one of the child characters... and they do the sweetest interview at the end. This is an important book for all to read ... and I wish felt as safe as these kiddos do in th...

    Not much to do on this rainy day but to read an amazing book! So many wonderful images and messages in this book! ...

    I absolutely love the idea of being a safe harbor for someone. As a librarian, I believe that libraries are safe harbors. The students in this story battled their own perception of themselves and each other to create a unique safe harbor. Each character had such rich complexity! I abso...

    Can't wait till my boys are old enough to read this kinds of books together - great for discussion. Especially in this current climate. ...

    Richie?s Picks: HARBOR ME by Jacqueline Woodson, Nancy Paulsen Books, August 2018, 192p., ISBN: 978-0-399-25252-5 ?Such a situation could have long-term, devastating effects on young children, who are likely to develop what is called toxic stress in their brain once separated fr...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s gift of words trick us into thinking the poetry oozing out of its pages at every turn magically appear, that we, too, can wield a mighty pen like a laden paintbrush and produce a masterpiece. Don?t be fooled, dear reader. That is why she is who she is, and we a...

    Rating: 4.75 stars Before the 2016 Newbery Medal winners were announced, I read a comment that stated something to the effect that the world belonged to Jacqueline Woodson, and we were all just being pulled along in the wake of her genius. I looked for the exact quote, but couldn't ...

    Harbor Me is so beautifully written that if it receives all the 2018-2019 children's literature accolades I'm assuming it will receive, I will have no qualms about it. Its message is a strong and relevant one, being dished out by one of children's literature's best authors. What kep...

  • Diane S ☔
    Jul 11, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

  • Kim
    Oct 08, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

    Jacqueline Woodson is a treasure and I would read anything she wrote, in any form, for any age group. I'm surprised that I haven't heard more about this book, because it's focus on kids and diversity and current events is so well done. The audiobook performance is so good too! Don't mi...

  • Katrina
    Oct 08, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

  • KC
    Aug 24, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

  • Rita Shaffer
    Sep 14, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

    Jacqueline Woodson is a treasure and I would read anything she wrote, in any form, for any age group. I'm surprised that I haven't heard more about this book, because it's focus on kids and diversity and current events is so well done. The audiobook performance is so good too! Don't mi...

    This was a short accessible read that touched on a lot of issues. Loss of a parent, immigration, racial profiling, and then there's the kiddo that hasn't experienced any of that, but sees how life can be cruel to his friends, and that effects him as well. Its a good one for all kids, w...

    I listened to the audiobook and it was extra special ... Jacqueline Woodson read Ms Laverne and her some reads one of the child characters... and they do the sweetest interview at the end. This is an important book for all to read ... and I wish felt as safe as these kiddos do in th...

  • Beth Honeycutt
    Sep 08, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

    Jacqueline Woodson is a treasure and I would read anything she wrote, in any form, for any age group. I'm surprised that I haven't heard more about this book, because it's focus on kids and diversity and current events is so well done. The audiobook performance is so good too! Don't mi...

    This was a short accessible read that touched on a lot of issues. Loss of a parent, immigration, racial profiling, and then there's the kiddo that hasn't experienced any of that, but sees how life can be cruel to his friends, and that effects him as well. Its a good one for all kids, w...

    I listened to the audiobook and it was extra special ... Jacqueline Woodson read Ms Laverne and her some reads one of the child characters... and they do the sweetest interview at the end. This is an important book for all to read ... and I wish felt as safe as these kiddos do in th...

    Not much to do on this rainy day but to read an amazing book! So many wonderful images and messages in this book! ...

  • Kate Olson
    Aug 01, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

  • Phil Jensen
    May 10, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

  • Sandra
    Sep 30, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

  • Leonard Kim
    Sep 04, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

  • Amaka
    May 12, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

  • Michelle
    Aug 03, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

  • Kiki Cole
    Jul 16, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

  • Katie Long
    Aug 06, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

  • Katie B
    Jul 07, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

  • Meagan Schultz
    Oct 02, 2018

    I don't often read books targeted for the middle school reader, but this is Woodson and I love how she tackles difficult subject. She does the same here, portraying six eleven and twelve year olds, all a different ethnicity, and from different backgrounds. All six have a harder time ac...

    This book has EVERYTHING - love, family, friends, middle school transitions, and the devastating realities faced by so many of our children in this country. It brought me tears, goosebumps, and gratitude that I'm alive in a world with people like Jackie Woodson. Seriously - buy copi...

    For a middle grade novel that is less than 200 pages, this story manages to cram in quite a few serious subjects including race, imprisonment, deportation, and the death of a parent. The ARTT Room (short for "A Room to Talk"), is a place where 6 students in a special learning class get...

    Thanks to a Kid Lit Exchange reviewer for sharing her free review copy from #NerdCampMI with us! . There are some books that I label "teaching books" and this is most certainly one of them. Of course it's one I want kids to pick up on their own as well, but it's one I want read out l...

    A good book, whether it?s written for a nine-year-old, a nineteen-year-old, or a ninety-year-old can tilt your perspective, if only momentarily. Consider the concept of the ?happy ending? and what it?s supposed to resemble. What does a real happy ending actually entail in real ...

    "The hardest part of telling a story is finding the beginning." Where do we start the dialogue in this country about acceptance and respect for others? It seems as if the collective has lost their minds. Each side is focused on rhetoric, everyone consumed by a war of "Us" versus "Th...

    Two years ago, this country elected a leader who promised to "Make America Great Again." But what does that mean? What is America, and what does it look like when it's great? In Harbor Me, Jacqueline Woodson offers her vision of America at its best. The plot is simple. Six tweens me...

    Jacqueline Woodson?s Harbor Me is a book for right now. We can?t always help what happens to us, and some kids are dealt really tough hands. The kids in Harbor Me are living with the realities of incarcerated parents, deportation threats, deceased parents, and mindless prejudice fo...

    Amazing book. So beautifully written. So needed for this country, our classrooms, our children, all our citizens RIGHT NOW. So powerful...the power of talk, of getting to know others ("Others"). So honest about race and privilege and ability (dis- and otherwise) and family and grie...

    I think this is a strong contender for next year's ALA awards, and with good reason. It's a slim little book, but the style is almost more poetry than prose, and each of the words and stories is lovely and clear. As these kids sit around in the old art room that their teacher gives the...

    I?m not the target audience for this book at all, but I love Jaqueline Woodson so much that I requested it from Penguin First to Read even though it is meant for a much younger reader. While this one doesn?t transcend its middle grade designation the way Brown Girl Dreaming does, i...

    Lives are made up of stories, and stories are shared to know that we are not alone. Six students spend an hour once a week in a classroom, just themselves, and an indelible bond forms among these budding human beings. Throughout the year, they learn about each other?s challenges in l...

    When group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialog, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face ...

    There is a tiny bit of story around the edges with the main character, but the overall plot of the book is: 6 kids sit around in a room and talk (often monologue) about Issues. That is not a story. It might work OK in verse (although a plot would still be a good thing to have), but it?...

    I have read two very similar books in one day. Harbor Me was the better out of the two. Nothing was offensive, but it was real and it showed the effect of social matters with kids. 6 kids are put into the ARTT room aka A Room To Talk. No adults are around and it's basically free lance ...

    I'm having a hard time with this. The writing is so lovely and the children are dear and genuine. But I wanted a different book, which may not be fair. This is mainly a collection of monologues told with eloquence. The reader gets the stories, the friends share, at a distance. ...

    Listened to audiobook. A couple years ago, Gary Paulsen wrote a book, Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat, that I don't remember that well but also featured a Breakfast Club-like scenario, six kids, forced together at school, not knowing each other well, but eventually talking and connecting. W...

    There are so many heavy topics covered in this novel such as immigration, racism, privilege, and parental loss. I was mesmerized by the characters and I can't get over how brilliant this story is. Haley's use of the recorder to remember her friends confessions was perfect. I love how ...

    Jacqueline Woodson is a treasure and I would read anything she wrote, in any form, for any age group. I'm surprised that I haven't heard more about this book, because it's focus on kids and diversity and current events is so well done. The audiobook performance is so good too! Don't mi...

    This was a short accessible read that touched on a lot of issues. Loss of a parent, immigration, racial profiling, and then there's the kiddo that hasn't experienced any of that, but sees how life can be cruel to his friends, and that effects him as well. Its a good one for all kids, w...

    I listened to the audiobook and it was extra special ... Jacqueline Woodson read Ms Laverne and her some reads one of the child characters... and they do the sweetest interview at the end. This is an important book for all to read ... and I wish felt as safe as these kiddos do in th...

    Not much to do on this rainy day but to read an amazing book! So many wonderful images and messages in this book! ...

    I absolutely love the idea of being a safe harbor for someone. As a librarian, I believe that libraries are safe harbors. The students in this story battled their own perception of themselves and each other to create a unique safe harbor. Each character had such rich complexity! I abso...

    Can't wait till my boys are old enough to read this kinds of books together - great for discussion. Especially in this current climate. ...