Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over

Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over

How are women, and artists, "seen" and judged by their age, race, and looks? And how does this seeing change, depending upon what is asked of the viewer? What does it mean when someone states (as one teacher does) that "you will never be an Artist"?who defines "an Artist," and all that goes with such an identity, and how are these ideas tied to our shared conceptions of be How are women, and artists, "seen" and judged by their age, race, and looks? And how does this seeing change, depending...

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Title:Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over
Author:Nell Irvin Painter
Rating:
Genres:Autobiography
ISBN:1640090614
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:331 pages pages

Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over Reviews

  • Mary
    Jun 30, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

  • Maya Rock
    Jul 04, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

  • Amy
    Jul 22, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

  • Carol
    Aug 02, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

  • Cyd
    Jul 17, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

    Nell Irwin Painter?s book is a good read and it is one that checks off a number of boxes: art, aging, African Americans, academics and children dealing with aging parents. I checked several boxes; I moved on from a successful career to working as an artist later in life. I did not ha...

    I give a book three chances before I add it to my DNF pile (barring something especially egregious). Admittedly, one of these is a personal irk, but OIAS did, in fact, use up its three chances: 1. Painter spends a great deal of time talking about how accomplished she is, how success...

    This is a great memoir for toughing it out, and going after a goal that is what you really want, even if it is not what you do BEST. And, that's hard; it messes with your head. This book captures the conflict between her knowledge of what being an expert truly feels like (as an esteeme...

    Nell Painter has ambition and drive; she decides to attend art school in her 60s, after an illustrious career as an academic, with the goal of becoming a professional artist. This goal prompts questions examined throughout the book such as how to define ?art,? how to determine its ...

    I nearly sent it back to Audible; I often think writers should not read their material, but I persisted and I'm glad I did. Ms. Painter's honest memoir about her decision to follow both her heart and mind to obtain a graduate degree in art in her 60s captures the essence of who she is,...

    I hated almost everything about this book. I expected a book about age and reinventing oneself in their later decades. Instead, it was a book about race and not being accepted as wonderful in a totally different field just because of your accomplishments elsewhere. The author came acro...

    (3.5 stars) I read this at work for professional development. It was enjoyable but the heavy emphasis on art history and making was tough for me to follow without my eyes glazing over. I truly enjoyed her exploration of relationships with other artists and art students. As a current em...

    Not very coherently written. I do understand why Painter went on and on about being a woman and black. Everyone isn?t as lucky as she to have such enormous privileges and success, and she knows it, but still it was a little irritating. What she doesn?t seem to get is that she d...

    3.75 - Painter starts out with a pedantic, scholarly tone that's a little off-putting at first, but eventually her bright, enthusiastic personality gives way making for a fun, informative, fascinating read. ...

    A bit disappointing. In my opinion way too self involved as she goes to Art school as an older student. Might have enjoyed it more if there was a little more grace and wisdom inserted. ...

    I could really relate to this book. The story of a brave struggle to reinvent oneself. ...

    Loved every page. Everyone who is old and/or artsy or has any ambition to one day be old and/or artsy should read this. ...

  • Lisa
    Jun 28, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

  • catherine james
    Aug 01, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

    Nell Irwin Painter?s book is a good read and it is one that checks off a number of boxes: art, aging, African Americans, academics and children dealing with aging parents. I checked several boxes; I moved on from a successful career to working as an artist later in life. I did not ha...

    I give a book three chances before I add it to my DNF pile (barring something especially egregious). Admittedly, one of these is a personal irk, but OIAS did, in fact, use up its three chances: 1. Painter spends a great deal of time talking about how accomplished she is, how success...

    This is a great memoir for toughing it out, and going after a goal that is what you really want, even if it is not what you do BEST. And, that's hard; it messes with your head. This book captures the conflict between her knowledge of what being an expert truly feels like (as an esteeme...

    Nell Painter has ambition and drive; she decides to attend art school in her 60s, after an illustrious career as an academic, with the goal of becoming a professional artist. This goal prompts questions examined throughout the book such as how to define ?art,? how to determine its ...

    I nearly sent it back to Audible; I often think writers should not read their material, but I persisted and I'm glad I did. Ms. Painter's honest memoir about her decision to follow both her heart and mind to obtain a graduate degree in art in her 60s captures the essence of who she is,...

    I hated almost everything about this book. I expected a book about age and reinventing oneself in their later decades. Instead, it was a book about race and not being accepted as wonderful in a totally different field just because of your accomplishments elsewhere. The author came acro...

    (3.5 stars) I read this at work for professional development. It was enjoyable but the heavy emphasis on art history and making was tough for me to follow without my eyes glazing over. I truly enjoyed her exploration of relationships with other artists and art students. As a current em...

    Not very coherently written. I do understand why Painter went on and on about being a woman and black. Everyone isn?t as lucky as she to have such enormous privileges and success, and she knows it, but still it was a little irritating. What she doesn?t seem to get is that she d...

    3.75 - Painter starts out with a pedantic, scholarly tone that's a little off-putting at first, but eventually her bright, enthusiastic personality gives way making for a fun, informative, fascinating read. ...

  • Beverly
    Aug 11, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

    Nell Irwin Painter?s book is a good read and it is one that checks off a number of boxes: art, aging, African Americans, academics and children dealing with aging parents. I checked several boxes; I moved on from a successful career to working as an artist later in life. I did not ha...

    I give a book three chances before I add it to my DNF pile (barring something especially egregious). Admittedly, one of these is a personal irk, but OIAS did, in fact, use up its three chances: 1. Painter spends a great deal of time talking about how accomplished she is, how success...

    This is a great memoir for toughing it out, and going after a goal that is what you really want, even if it is not what you do BEST. And, that's hard; it messes with your head. This book captures the conflict between her knowledge of what being an expert truly feels like (as an esteeme...

    Nell Painter has ambition and drive; she decides to attend art school in her 60s, after an illustrious career as an academic, with the goal of becoming a professional artist. This goal prompts questions examined throughout the book such as how to define ?art,? how to determine its ...

    I nearly sent it back to Audible; I often think writers should not read their material, but I persisted and I'm glad I did. Ms. Painter's honest memoir about her decision to follow both her heart and mind to obtain a graduate degree in art in her 60s captures the essence of who she is,...

    I hated almost everything about this book. I expected a book about age and reinventing oneself in their later decades. Instead, it was a book about race and not being accepted as wonderful in a totally different field just because of your accomplishments elsewhere. The author came acro...

    (3.5 stars) I read this at work for professional development. It was enjoyable but the heavy emphasis on art history and making was tough for me to follow without my eyes glazing over. I truly enjoyed her exploration of relationships with other artists and art students. As a current em...

    Not very coherently written. I do understand why Painter went on and on about being a woman and black. Everyone isn?t as lucky as she to have such enormous privileges and success, and she knows it, but still it was a little irritating. What she doesn?t seem to get is that she d...

  • Julie
    Aug 09, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

    Nell Irwin Painter?s book is a good read and it is one that checks off a number of boxes: art, aging, African Americans, academics and children dealing with aging parents. I checked several boxes; I moved on from a successful career to working as an artist later in life. I did not ha...

    I give a book three chances before I add it to my DNF pile (barring something especially egregious). Admittedly, one of these is a personal irk, but OIAS did, in fact, use up its three chances: 1. Painter spends a great deal of time talking about how accomplished she is, how success...

    This is a great memoir for toughing it out, and going after a goal that is what you really want, even if it is not what you do BEST. And, that's hard; it messes with your head. This book captures the conflict between her knowledge of what being an expert truly feels like (as an esteeme...

    Nell Painter has ambition and drive; she decides to attend art school in her 60s, after an illustrious career as an academic, with the goal of becoming a professional artist. This goal prompts questions examined throughout the book such as how to define ?art,? how to determine its ...

    I nearly sent it back to Audible; I often think writers should not read their material, but I persisted and I'm glad I did. Ms. Painter's honest memoir about her decision to follow both her heart and mind to obtain a graduate degree in art in her 60s captures the essence of who she is,...

    I hated almost everything about this book. I expected a book about age and reinventing oneself in their later decades. Instead, it was a book about race and not being accepted as wonderful in a totally different field just because of your accomplishments elsewhere. The author came acro...

  • Jillian
    Aug 01, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

  • Julie
    Jul 06, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

    Nell Irwin Painter?s book is a good read and it is one that checks off a number of boxes: art, aging, African Americans, academics and children dealing with aging parents. I checked several boxes; I moved on from a successful career to working as an artist later in life. I did not ha...

    I give a book three chances before I add it to my DNF pile (barring something especially egregious). Admittedly, one of these is a personal irk, but OIAS did, in fact, use up its three chances: 1. Painter spends a great deal of time talking about how accomplished she is, how success...

    This is a great memoir for toughing it out, and going after a goal that is what you really want, even if it is not what you do BEST. And, that's hard; it messes with your head. This book captures the conflict between her knowledge of what being an expert truly feels like (as an esteeme...

    Nell Painter has ambition and drive; she decides to attend art school in her 60s, after an illustrious career as an academic, with the goal of becoming a professional artist. This goal prompts questions examined throughout the book such as how to define ?art,? how to determine its ...

    I nearly sent it back to Audible; I often think writers should not read their material, but I persisted and I'm glad I did. Ms. Painter's honest memoir about her decision to follow both her heart and mind to obtain a graduate degree in art in her 60s captures the essence of who she is,...

  • Paulina
    Aug 13, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

    Nell Irwin Painter?s book is a good read and it is one that checks off a number of boxes: art, aging, African Americans, academics and children dealing with aging parents. I checked several boxes; I moved on from a successful career to working as an artist later in life. I did not ha...

    I give a book three chances before I add it to my DNF pile (barring something especially egregious). Admittedly, one of these is a personal irk, but OIAS did, in fact, use up its three chances: 1. Painter spends a great deal of time talking about how accomplished she is, how success...

    This is a great memoir for toughing it out, and going after a goal that is what you really want, even if it is not what you do BEST. And, that's hard; it messes with your head. This book captures the conflict between her knowledge of what being an expert truly feels like (as an esteeme...

    Nell Painter has ambition and drive; she decides to attend art school in her 60s, after an illustrious career as an academic, with the goal of becoming a professional artist. This goal prompts questions examined throughout the book such as how to define ?art,? how to determine its ...

  • Lin Salisbury
    Aug 10, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

  • Julie Ehlers
    Jul 04, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

  • ND
    Jul 22, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

  • Kathleen
    Jul 03, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

  • Erin
    Jul 27, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

    Nell Irwin Painter?s book is a good read and it is one that checks off a number of boxes: art, aging, African Americans, academics and children dealing with aging parents. I checked several boxes; I moved on from a successful career to working as an artist later in life. I did not ha...

    I give a book three chances before I add it to my DNF pile (barring something especially egregious). Admittedly, one of these is a personal irk, but OIAS did, in fact, use up its three chances: 1. Painter spends a great deal of time talking about how accomplished she is, how success...

    This is a great memoir for toughing it out, and going after a goal that is what you really want, even if it is not what you do BEST. And, that's hard; it messes with your head. This book captures the conflict between her knowledge of what being an expert truly feels like (as an esteeme...

    Nell Painter has ambition and drive; she decides to attend art school in her 60s, after an illustrious career as an academic, with the goal of becoming a professional artist. This goal prompts questions examined throughout the book such as how to define ?art,? how to determine its ...

    I nearly sent it back to Audible; I often think writers should not read their material, but I persisted and I'm glad I did. Ms. Painter's honest memoir about her decision to follow both her heart and mind to obtain a graduate degree in art in her 60s captures the essence of who she is,...

    I hated almost everything about this book. I expected a book about age and reinventing oneself in their later decades. Instead, it was a book about race and not being accepted as wonderful in a totally different field just because of your accomplishments elsewhere. The author came acro...

    (3.5 stars) I read this at work for professional development. It was enjoyable but the heavy emphasis on art history and making was tough for me to follow without my eyes glazing over. I truly enjoyed her exploration of relationships with other artists and art students. As a current em...

  • Jane
    Jul 25, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

  • Marianne
    Jul 05, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

    Nell Irwin Painter?s book is a good read and it is one that checks off a number of boxes: art, aging, African Americans, academics and children dealing with aging parents. I checked several boxes; I moved on from a successful career to working as an artist later in life. I did not ha...

    I give a book three chances before I add it to my DNF pile (barring something especially egregious). Admittedly, one of these is a personal irk, but OIAS did, in fact, use up its three chances: 1. Painter spends a great deal of time talking about how accomplished she is, how success...

    This is a great memoir for toughing it out, and going after a goal that is what you really want, even if it is not what you do BEST. And, that's hard; it messes with your head. This book captures the conflict between her knowledge of what being an expert truly feels like (as an esteeme...

    Nell Painter has ambition and drive; she decides to attend art school in her 60s, after an illustrious career as an academic, with the goal of becoming a professional artist. This goal prompts questions examined throughout the book such as how to define ?art,? how to determine its ...

    I nearly sent it back to Audible; I often think writers should not read their material, but I persisted and I'm glad I did. Ms. Painter's honest memoir about her decision to follow both her heart and mind to obtain a graduate degree in art in her 60s captures the essence of who she is,...

    I hated almost everything about this book. I expected a book about age and reinventing oneself in their later decades. Instead, it was a book about race and not being accepted as wonderful in a totally different field just because of your accomplishments elsewhere. The author came acro...

    (3.5 stars) I read this at work for professional development. It was enjoyable but the heavy emphasis on art history and making was tough for me to follow without my eyes glazing over. I truly enjoyed her exploration of relationships with other artists and art students. As a current em...

    Not very coherently written. I do understand why Painter went on and on about being a woman and black. Everyone isn?t as lucky as she to have such enormous privileges and success, and she knows it, but still it was a little irritating. What she doesn?t seem to get is that she d...

    3.75 - Painter starts out with a pedantic, scholarly tone that's a little off-putting at first, but eventually her bright, enthusiastic personality gives way making for a fun, informative, fascinating read. ...

    A bit disappointing. In my opinion way too self involved as she goes to Art school as an older student. Might have enjoyed it more if there was a little more grace and wisdom inserted. ...

  • Zack Rearick
    Jul 07, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

  • gnarlyhiker
    Jul 03, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

  • Katharine
    Jul 29, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

    Nell Irwin Painter?s book is a good read and it is one that checks off a number of boxes: art, aging, African Americans, academics and children dealing with aging parents. I checked several boxes; I moved on from a successful career to working as an artist later in life. I did not ha...

  • Naomi
    Jul 19, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

  • Samantha
    Aug 10, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

    Nell Irwin Painter?s book is a good read and it is one that checks off a number of boxes: art, aging, African Americans, academics and children dealing with aging parents. I checked several boxes; I moved on from a successful career to working as an artist later in life. I did not ha...

    I give a book three chances before I add it to my DNF pile (barring something especially egregious). Admittedly, one of these is a personal irk, but OIAS did, in fact, use up its three chances: 1. Painter spends a great deal of time talking about how accomplished she is, how success...

  • Joan
    Jun 27, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

  • Judy
    Jul 18, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

    Nell Irwin Painter?s book is a good read and it is one that checks off a number of boxes: art, aging, African Americans, academics and children dealing with aging parents. I checked several boxes; I moved on from a successful career to working as an artist later in life. I did not ha...

    I give a book three chances before I add it to my DNF pile (barring something especially egregious). Admittedly, one of these is a personal irk, but OIAS did, in fact, use up its three chances: 1. Painter spends a great deal of time talking about how accomplished she is, how success...

    This is a great memoir for toughing it out, and going after a goal that is what you really want, even if it is not what you do BEST. And, that's hard; it messes with your head. This book captures the conflict between her knowledge of what being an expert truly feels like (as an esteeme...

    Nell Painter has ambition and drive; she decides to attend art school in her 60s, after an illustrious career as an academic, with the goal of becoming a professional artist. This goal prompts questions examined throughout the book such as how to define ?art,? how to determine its ...

    I nearly sent it back to Audible; I often think writers should not read their material, but I persisted and I'm glad I did. Ms. Painter's honest memoir about her decision to follow both her heart and mind to obtain a graduate degree in art in her 60s captures the essence of who she is,...

    I hated almost everything about this book. I expected a book about age and reinventing oneself in their later decades. Instead, it was a book about race and not being accepted as wonderful in a totally different field just because of your accomplishments elsewhere. The author came acro...

    (3.5 stars) I read this at work for professional development. It was enjoyable but the heavy emphasis on art history and making was tough for me to follow without my eyes glazing over. I truly enjoyed her exploration of relationships with other artists and art students. As a current em...

    Not very coherently written. I do understand why Painter went on and on about being a woman and black. Everyone isn?t as lucky as she to have such enormous privileges and success, and she knows it, but still it was a little irritating. What she doesn?t seem to get is that she d...

    3.75 - Painter starts out with a pedantic, scholarly tone that's a little off-putting at first, but eventually her bright, enthusiastic personality gives way making for a fun, informative, fascinating read. ...

    A bit disappointing. In my opinion way too self involved as she goes to Art school as an older student. Might have enjoyed it more if there was a little more grace and wisdom inserted. ...

    I could really relate to this book. The story of a brave struggle to reinvent oneself. ...

  • Krista Park
    Jul 07, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

  • LeAnn Locher
    Jul 29, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

  • Paula Pergament
    Jul 21, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

  • Cheryl Campbell
    Jul 10, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    Nell Painter?s Old in Art School, A Memoir of Starting Over is a paean to lost dreams. At 64, Painter, a respected historian and author of the New York Times bestselling The History of White People, retired from teaching at Princeton to pursue an art degree. A scholar at heart, she...

    Nell Irwin Painter?s book is a good read and it is one that checks off a number of boxes: art, aging, African Americans, academics and children dealing with aging parents. I checked several boxes; I moved on from a successful career to working as an artist later in life. I did not ha...

    I give a book three chances before I add it to my DNF pile (barring something especially egregious). Admittedly, one of these is a personal irk, but OIAS did, in fact, use up its three chances: 1. Painter spends a great deal of time talking about how accomplished she is, how success...

    This is a great memoir for toughing it out, and going after a goal that is what you really want, even if it is not what you do BEST. And, that's hard; it messes with your head. This book captures the conflict between her knowledge of what being an expert truly feels like (as an esteeme...