Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over

Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over

How are women, and artists, "seen" and judged by their age, race, and looks? And how does this seeing change, depending upon what is asked of the viewer? What does it mean when someone states (as one teacher does) that "you will never be an Artist"?who defines "an Artist," and all that goes with such an identity, and how are these ideas tied to our shared conceptions of be How are women, and artists, "seen" and judged by their age, race, and looks? And how does this seeing change, depending...

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Title:Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over
Author:Nell Irvin Painter
Rating:
Genres:Autobiography
ISBN:1640090614
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:331 pages pages

Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over Reviews

  • Lydia
    Aug 16, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

  • Mary
    Jun 30, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

  • Maya Rock
    Jul 04, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

  • Lauren
    Oct 24, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    I'm struggling a bit to decide what I thought of this book. I do love the idea that at 64, renowned historian Nell Painter decided to switch gears and go to art school. I made a career change in my 30s/40s--although I wasn't famous in my previous one and didn't tackle something quite a...

    I did not want this book to end. While it did not turn out to be the blazing tell-all about RISD that I had hoped, what I got by reading it was a total gift. Nell Painter's insight into what it means to be a woman, what it means to embrace your passions later in life, and what it means...

    I ate this up. It doesn't hurt that I'm trying to challenge myself with new endeavors as I get closer to my 70th decade. Painter is a notable, award winning, genius historian but she goes back to the beginning for BFA and MFA in Fine Arts at the same time that she is caring for elderly...

  • Amy
    Jul 22, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

  • Carol
    Aug 02, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

  • Lisa
    Jun 28, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

  • Dana
    Oct 22, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    I'm struggling a bit to decide what I thought of this book. I do love the idea that at 64, renowned historian Nell Painter decided to switch gears and go to art school. I made a career change in my 30s/40s--although I wasn't famous in my previous one and didn't tackle something quite a...

  • Jillian
    Aug 01, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

  • Julie Ehlers
    Jul 04, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

  • Mimi
    Oct 19, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    I'm struggling a bit to decide what I thought of this book. I do love the idea that at 64, renowned historian Nell Painter decided to switch gears and go to art school. I made a career change in my 30s/40s--although I wasn't famous in my previous one and didn't tackle something quite a...

    I did not want this book to end. While it did not turn out to be the blazing tell-all about RISD that I had hoped, what I got by reading it was a total gift. Nell Painter's insight into what it means to be a woman, what it means to embrace your passions later in life, and what it means...

    I ate this up. It doesn't hurt that I'm trying to challenge myself with new endeavors as I get closer to my 70th decade. Painter is a notable, award winning, genius historian but she goes back to the beginning for BFA and MFA in Fine Arts at the same time that she is caring for elderly...

    wonderful memoir, loved the dispiriting feelings after Crits at RISD, having gone to art school myself, I have empathy. It was extraordinary of her, a black woman of 64 and already an eminent historian to decide to change careers, highly admirable. a 3.8. My one criticism is the reprod...

  • Alyson Hagy
    Sep 19, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

  • Jim Leckband
    Aug 22, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

  • ND
    Jul 22, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    I'm struggling a bit to decide what I thought of this book. I do love the idea that at 64, renowned historian Nell Painter decided to switch gears and go to art school. I made a career change in my 30s/40s--although I wasn't famous in my previous one and didn't tackle something quite a...

    I did not want this book to end. While it did not turn out to be the blazing tell-all about RISD that I had hoped, what I got by reading it was a total gift. Nell Painter's insight into what it means to be a woman, what it means to embrace your passions later in life, and what it means...

    I ate this up. It doesn't hurt that I'm trying to challenge myself with new endeavors as I get closer to my 70th decade. Painter is a notable, award winning, genius historian but she goes back to the beginning for BFA and MFA in Fine Arts at the same time that she is caring for elderly...

    wonderful memoir, loved the dispiriting feelings after Crits at RISD, having gone to art school myself, I have empathy. It was extraordinary of her, a black woman of 64 and already an eminent historian to decide to change careers, highly admirable. a 3.8. My one criticism is the reprod...

    Notes of Interest: The instant I saw this book, I knew I had to read it. It?s relative to my own ?starting over? circumstances and desire to return to art education, alongside my writing education and career. I was curious to know the thoughts of someone else who did it. Did s...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

  • Kathleen
    Jul 03, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

  • Erin
    Jul 27, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    I'm struggling a bit to decide what I thought of this book. I do love the idea that at 64, renowned historian Nell Painter decided to switch gears and go to art school. I made a career change in my 30s/40s--although I wasn't famous in my previous one and didn't tackle something quite a...

    I did not want this book to end. While it did not turn out to be the blazing tell-all about RISD that I had hoped, what I got by reading it was a total gift. Nell Painter's insight into what it means to be a woman, what it means to embrace your passions later in life, and what it means...

    I ate this up. It doesn't hurt that I'm trying to challenge myself with new endeavors as I get closer to my 70th decade. Painter is a notable, award winning, genius historian but she goes back to the beginning for BFA and MFA in Fine Arts at the same time that she is caring for elderly...

    wonderful memoir, loved the dispiriting feelings after Crits at RISD, having gone to art school myself, I have empathy. It was extraordinary of her, a black woman of 64 and already an eminent historian to decide to change careers, highly admirable. a 3.8. My one criticism is the reprod...

    Notes of Interest: The instant I saw this book, I knew I had to read it. It?s relative to my own ?starting over? circumstances and desire to return to art education, alongside my writing education and career. I was curious to know the thoughts of someone else who did it. Did s...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Inspirational at any age (New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, California, 2005 to present): When a leading historian in the United States writes she was ?born to paint,? we understand her need for creativity. That still doesn?t explain why at 64 an endowed professor at Princeton ...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    (3.5 stars) I read this at work for professional development. It was enjoyable but the heavy emphasis on art history and making was tough for me to follow without my eyes glazing over. I truly enjoyed her exploration of relationships with other artists and art students. As a current em...

  • Jane
    Jul 25, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

  • Zack Rearick
    Jul 07, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    I'm struggling a bit to decide what I thought of this book. I do love the idea that at 64, renowned historian Nell Painter decided to switch gears and go to art school. I made a career change in my 30s/40s--although I wasn't famous in my previous one and didn't tackle something quite a...

    I did not want this book to end. While it did not turn out to be the blazing tell-all about RISD that I had hoped, what I got by reading it was a total gift. Nell Painter's insight into what it means to be a woman, what it means to embrace your passions later in life, and what it means...

    I ate this up. It doesn't hurt that I'm trying to challenge myself with new endeavors as I get closer to my 70th decade. Painter is a notable, award winning, genius historian but she goes back to the beginning for BFA and MFA in Fine Arts at the same time that she is caring for elderly...

    wonderful memoir, loved the dispiriting feelings after Crits at RISD, having gone to art school myself, I have empathy. It was extraordinary of her, a black woman of 64 and already an eminent historian to decide to change careers, highly admirable. a 3.8. My one criticism is the reprod...

    Notes of Interest: The instant I saw this book, I knew I had to read it. It?s relative to my own ?starting over? circumstances and desire to return to art education, alongside my writing education and career. I was curious to know the thoughts of someone else who did it. Did s...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Inspirational at any age (New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, California, 2005 to present): When a leading historian in the United States writes she was ?born to paint,? we understand her need for creativity. That still doesn?t explain why at 64 an endowed professor at Princeton ...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

  • Melody Daggerhart
    Oct 01, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    I'm struggling a bit to decide what I thought of this book. I do love the idea that at 64, renowned historian Nell Painter decided to switch gears and go to art school. I made a career change in my 30s/40s--although I wasn't famous in my previous one and didn't tackle something quite a...

    I did not want this book to end. While it did not turn out to be the blazing tell-all about RISD that I had hoped, what I got by reading it was a total gift. Nell Painter's insight into what it means to be a woman, what it means to embrace your passions later in life, and what it means...

    I ate this up. It doesn't hurt that I'm trying to challenge myself with new endeavors as I get closer to my 70th decade. Painter is a notable, award winning, genius historian but she goes back to the beginning for BFA and MFA in Fine Arts at the same time that she is caring for elderly...

    wonderful memoir, loved the dispiriting feelings after Crits at RISD, having gone to art school myself, I have empathy. It was extraordinary of her, a black woman of 64 and already an eminent historian to decide to change careers, highly admirable. a 3.8. My one criticism is the reprod...

    Notes of Interest: The instant I saw this book, I knew I had to read it. It?s relative to my own ?starting over? circumstances and desire to return to art education, alongside my writing education and career. I was curious to know the thoughts of someone else who did it. Did s...

  • gnarlyhiker
    Jul 03, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

  • Xtine
    Sep 01, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

  • Naomi
    Jul 19, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

  • Samantha
    Aug 10, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    I'm struggling a bit to decide what I thought of this book. I do love the idea that at 64, renowned historian Nell Painter decided to switch gears and go to art school. I made a career change in my 30s/40s--although I wasn't famous in my previous one and didn't tackle something quite a...

    I did not want this book to end. While it did not turn out to be the blazing tell-all about RISD that I had hoped, what I got by reading it was a total gift. Nell Painter's insight into what it means to be a woman, what it means to embrace your passions later in life, and what it means...

    I ate this up. It doesn't hurt that I'm trying to challenge myself with new endeavors as I get closer to my 70th decade. Painter is a notable, award winning, genius historian but she goes back to the beginning for BFA and MFA in Fine Arts at the same time that she is caring for elderly...

    wonderful memoir, loved the dispiriting feelings after Crits at RISD, having gone to art school myself, I have empathy. It was extraordinary of her, a black woman of 64 and already an eminent historian to decide to change careers, highly admirable. a 3.8. My one criticism is the reprod...

    Notes of Interest: The instant I saw this book, I knew I had to read it. It?s relative to my own ?starting over? circumstances and desire to return to art education, alongside my writing education and career. I was curious to know the thoughts of someone else who did it. Did s...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Inspirational at any age (New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, California, 2005 to present): When a leading historian in the United States writes she was ?born to paint,? we understand her need for creativity. That still doesn?t explain why at 64 an endowed professor at Princeton ...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

    (3.5 stars) I read this at work for professional development. It was enjoyable but the heavy emphasis on art history and making was tough for me to follow without my eyes glazing over. I truly enjoyed her exploration of relationships with other artists and art students. As a current em...

    I give a book three chances before I add it to my DNF pile (barring something especially egregious). Admittedly, one of these is a personal irk, but OIAS did, in fact, use up its three chances: 1. Painter spends a great deal of time talking about how accomplished she is, how success...

  • Enchanted Prose
    Sep 29, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    I'm struggling a bit to decide what I thought of this book. I do love the idea that at 64, renowned historian Nell Painter decided to switch gears and go to art school. I made a career change in my 30s/40s--although I wasn't famous in my previous one and didn't tackle something quite a...

    I did not want this book to end. While it did not turn out to be the blazing tell-all about RISD that I had hoped, what I got by reading it was a total gift. Nell Painter's insight into what it means to be a woman, what it means to embrace your passions later in life, and what it means...

    I ate this up. It doesn't hurt that I'm trying to challenge myself with new endeavors as I get closer to my 70th decade. Painter is a notable, award winning, genius historian but she goes back to the beginning for BFA and MFA in Fine Arts at the same time that she is caring for elderly...

    wonderful memoir, loved the dispiriting feelings after Crits at RISD, having gone to art school myself, I have empathy. It was extraordinary of her, a black woman of 64 and already an eminent historian to decide to change careers, highly admirable. a 3.8. My one criticism is the reprod...

    Notes of Interest: The instant I saw this book, I knew I had to read it. It?s relative to my own ?starting over? circumstances and desire to return to art education, alongside my writing education and career. I was curious to know the thoughts of someone else who did it. Did s...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Inspirational at any age (New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, California, 2005 to present): When a leading historian in the United States writes she was ?born to paint,? we understand her need for creativity. That still doesn?t explain why at 64 an endowed professor at Princeton ...

  • Joan
    Jun 27, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

  • Abbi
    Aug 18, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

  • Krista Park
    Jul 07, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    I'm struggling a bit to decide what I thought of this book. I do love the idea that at 64, renowned historian Nell Painter decided to switch gears and go to art school. I made a career change in my 30s/40s--although I wasn't famous in my previous one and didn't tackle something quite a...

    I did not want this book to end. While it did not turn out to be the blazing tell-all about RISD that I had hoped, what I got by reading it was a total gift. Nell Painter's insight into what it means to be a woman, what it means to embrace your passions later in life, and what it means...

    I ate this up. It doesn't hurt that I'm trying to challenge myself with new endeavors as I get closer to my 70th decade. Painter is a notable, award winning, genius historian but she goes back to the beginning for BFA and MFA in Fine Arts at the same time that she is caring for elderly...

    wonderful memoir, loved the dispiriting feelings after Crits at RISD, having gone to art school myself, I have empathy. It was extraordinary of her, a black woman of 64 and already an eminent historian to decide to change careers, highly admirable. a 3.8. My one criticism is the reprod...

    Notes of Interest: The instant I saw this book, I knew I had to read it. It?s relative to my own ?starting over? circumstances and desire to return to art education, alongside my writing education and career. I was curious to know the thoughts of someone else who did it. Did s...

    Entertained me but I got a bit tired of her...especially when she was bragging about her resume. I also didn't entirely understand why she stopped being an historian. But moving in places. ...

    Inspirational at any age (New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, California, 2005 to present): When a leading historian in the United States writes she was ?born to paint,? we understand her need for creativity. That still doesn?t explain why at 64 an endowed professor at Princeton ...

    Good audiobook, read by the author. Painter is eminently interesting, a prominent historian turned "old" student and artist. She focuses mostly on her experience in art school and the challenge of juggling a successful career while striving toward another. I also appreciated her though...

    Spectacular read. I will search out more of her books. ...

  • LeAnn Locher
    Jul 29, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

  • Paula Pergament
    Jul 21, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

  • SukiG
    Oct 10, 2018

    There are many things to love about Old in Art School. The whole idea of someone going art school at the age of 64 is amazing, and Painter definitely provides a detailed sense of the experience for those of us who've never been (nor, in fact, even know someone who's been). Sadly, I bel...

    This one took a while?in addition to her storyline, Painter offers up a lot of interesting digressions about the art world and art world politics, so the narrative isn't always straightforwardly propulsive. I found myself?and this is a good thing?stopping to look up artists she m...

    Nell Painter didn't give me what I was looking for. I expected a smoother ride -- gentle acceptance, a coherent story. But instead Painter shows her brain raw -- from elation to anger to irritation, to contentment ... and finally to an MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. This is a ...

    Nell Painter and I have lived parallel lives. The events and feeling she describes regarding her retirement, return to school, change of careers, and managing elderly parents are things I have experienced. Especially poignant are her descriptions of being treated as an older woman and ...

    Didn?t finish after reading this passage. Page 74: (about a fellow student) ?Soft little Kerry painted pretty horses. I shouldn?t call her ?fat.? My good feminist friends have slapped my hands over my use of that word, but my disdain for her painting sees her in just so judgm...

    I don?t know why I thought I?d like this book. I?m not really an art person. I don?t really ?get? ?art.? I think the second act aspect is really what interested me and then I actually started reading it and realized it was actually about art. As soon as I started it I d...

    I'm at 50% read and I'm abandoning reading this book. So disappointed. What began as a cheerleader to yeah! a voice for women! yeah! a voice for women of color! yeah! a voice for artists at all ages! became a whimper of sadness that it does not include a voice for women of size. Sigh. ...

    Although I could empathize with the author's plight, her unrealistic expectations became tedious and her entitled attitude annoying. She somehow assumed that her brilliant career as an academic should have translated into automatic respect in a totally different field - as if a prize w...

    At first I wasn?t taken with Painter?s memoir, it felt like she was taking too much time establishing her credentials in the world of history and academia. I am chagrined that I felt that way. As a historian, Painter is a fully realized top dog. Quiting that world at 64 to go to ar...

    Thoroughly enjoyed I really enjoyed this book. It encompasses so much, it?s hard to describe. I learned so much about art and RISD and appreciated the author?s analyses of her own artistic weaknesses and strengths; her relationships with her peers; her handling of her elderly pa...

    I learned more from than this book than I actually enjoyed reading it. I learned about some amazing artists I was ashamed I hadn't heard more of. Sometimes I thought this book was written for a certain audience - mainly people who are familiar with art school and academia. Sometimes I ...

    Fascinating woman who has accomplished quite a lot. Dr. Painter is a noted historian. Then in her 60s returned to school to obtain yet another advanced degree, this time an MFA. Look carefully at the cover. At a book signing she indicated its a collage of cut up pages from her book,...

    This was the very right book for me at the very right time. I'm not changing my career or field, but I am of the age where I have (always) far more questions about art and the practice of art than I do answers. Painter's fascinating narrative of how she went back to painting (and the v...

    I think the value of this book, is Irwin Painter?s ability to lash out eloquently at those schools, art schools or not, who don?t treat the serious older student as ?worthy.? In this case, Irwin Painter is a Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton. She is black. She is 70 ye...

    I can't recall where I came across this memoir but the synopsis of it compelled me to read it. Honestly, before I had even reached the 100-page mark, I would've given this book 3 stars. At that point, I felt that the author was getting caught up in the thick of telling us about Art His...

    For those who are looking for a second career, and are thinking about going back school ?especially art school, or other undergraduate program that is unrelated to your current field of expertise ? I highly recommend this book. I shared many of Painter's thoughts & experiences,...

    After many years of a very successful career in one discipline, it is perhaps understandable to have some pride in your accomplishments. But damn, I got tired of "how great I am". That being said, Painter does have the proper humility of learning a new discipline. A beginning artist...

    a most excellent collage of a memoir with a spattering of art history. a great summer read, too. recommend interview: www.historyworkshop.org.uk/tag/nell-p... good luck ...

    This was one of the most enjoyable books I've read in years. I learned about artists I've never heard of, I got an insider's look at art school, and I learned a bit about how racism and the art world intersect. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in art, creating ar...

    I'm struggling a bit to decide what I thought of this book. I do love the idea that at 64, renowned historian Nell Painter decided to switch gears and go to art school. I made a career change in my 30s/40s--although I wasn't famous in my previous one and didn't tackle something quite a...

    I did not want this book to end. While it did not turn out to be the blazing tell-all about RISD that I had hoped, what I got by reading it was a total gift. Nell Painter's insight into what it means to be a woman, what it means to embrace your passions later in life, and what it means...