The Fox

The Fox

'Forsyth deserves his place among the thriller greats.' The Times 'The master of the modern espionage novel returns . . . this is Forsyth at his spellbinding best.' Daily Mail Most weapons do what you tell them. Most weapons you can control. But what if the most dangerous weapon in the world isn?t a smart missile or a stealth submarine or even an AI computer programme?What if 'Forsyth deserves his place among the thriller greats.' The Times 'The master of the modern espionage ...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Fox
Author:Frederick Forsyth
Rating:
Genres:Thriller
ISBN:The Fox
ISBN
Format Type:ebook

The Fox Reviews

  • Sambasivan
    Oct 07, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

    One would expect better from the author of "The Day of the Jackal." ...

    Book Review: The Fox by Frederick Forsyth Quite a disappointment to say the least, considering readers' excitement due mainly to the writer's name. This book is a globalist's pipe dream disguised as a thriller, a bit too clever by far. Very little of the story is centered on the ...

    Frederick Forsyth has done it again! Next to The Day of The Jackal, The Fox is the next best he has written! It is written in Frederick Forsyth style with exact detail to historical events which reminds me of things he pulled from The Dog of War, The Fist of God, The Afghan and T...

    Very disappointing I have really enjoyed some of his earlier books. This one was a huge let down. No character development to the point that you couldn?t care less if the main characters were all murdered half way through the novel. ...

    Does the job, disappointingly so... Highly up to date with the latest geopolitical events woven skillfully into the plot. Those who believe the official (US/UK) versions of things will enjoy themselves thoroughly. Those sceptical of postcolonialist and hegemonic politics, will frown...

    A select few authors are able to write a novel filled with cliches without making me cringe. Forsyth tend to be one of those. The book is certainly a cheap thriller where convenient coincidences turn the plot in every chapter. Still, it manages to create its own charm. The character...

    Worst Forsyth book ever written. The book was a horrible disappointment. The overarching plot can be at best described as genius boy waving his magic fingers to defeat all the enemies of the West using a computer. And I use the "magic" deliberately because though the book is about h...

    Brain dead wish fulfilment fantasy. The British flicking everyone's noses. The hacking is dumber than in the dumbest Hollywood film. And everyone lived happily ever after. ...

    The best thing about this book is that it didn't take long to read. I remember being hugely impressed by "The Day of the Jackal" but that was long, long ago and I wonder if Forsyth himself actually wrote this at all. Wooden characters, a pathetic plot - I only kept reading to see how t...

    Terribly far-fetched and biased. Poorly researched and carelessly strung story. A sad comedown from an author, admired for the meticulous research that went into great thrillers like The Day of the Jackal ...

    The master storyteller never disappoints. He writes with such an incredible authority backed by deep research, that one finds it extremely difficult to distinguish fact from fiction. The story rings so true and eminently credible. Vintage Forsyth. ...

  • Skip
    Nov 05, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

  • Jo
    Nov 28, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

  • Jerry B
    Oct 29, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

  • Paula Lyle
    Nov 11, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

  • Jim
    Nov 15, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

  • Aruna Kumar Gadepalli
    Sep 24, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

    One would expect better from the author of "The Day of the Jackal." ...

    Book Review: The Fox by Frederick Forsyth Quite a disappointment to say the least, considering readers' excitement due mainly to the writer's name. This book is a globalist's pipe dream disguised as a thriller, a bit too clever by far. Very little of the story is centered on the ...

    Frederick Forsyth has done it again! Next to The Day of The Jackal, The Fox is the next best he has written! It is written in Frederick Forsyth style with exact detail to historical events which reminds me of things he pulled from The Dog of War, The Fist of God, The Afghan and T...

    Very disappointing I have really enjoyed some of his earlier books. This one was a huge let down. No character development to the point that you couldn?t care less if the main characters were all murdered half way through the novel. ...

    Does the job, disappointingly so... Highly up to date with the latest geopolitical events woven skillfully into the plot. Those who believe the official (US/UK) versions of things will enjoy themselves thoroughly. Those sceptical of postcolonialist and hegemonic politics, will frown...

    A select few authors are able to write a novel filled with cliches without making me cringe. Forsyth tend to be one of those. The book is certainly a cheap thriller where convenient coincidences turn the plot in every chapter. Still, it manages to create its own charm. The character...

    Worst Forsyth book ever written. The book was a horrible disappointment. The overarching plot can be at best described as genius boy waving his magic fingers to defeat all the enemies of the West using a computer. And I use the "magic" deliberately because though the book is about h...

    Brain dead wish fulfilment fantasy. The British flicking everyone's noses. The hacking is dumber than in the dumbest Hollywood film. And everyone lived happily ever after. ...

    The best thing about this book is that it didn't take long to read. I remember being hugely impressed by "The Day of the Jackal" but that was long, long ago and I wonder if Forsyth himself actually wrote this at all. Wooden characters, a pathetic plot - I only kept reading to see how t...

    Terribly far-fetched and biased. Poorly researched and carelessly strung story. A sad comedown from an author, admired for the meticulous research that went into great thrillers like The Day of the Jackal ...

    The master storyteller never disappoints. He writes with such an incredible authority backed by deep research, that one finds it extremely difficult to distinguish fact from fiction. The story rings so true and eminently credible. Vintage Forsyth. ...

    Long waiting for the book made me hook to the book book. Strategies in the power politics, the technology that vulnerable to the human mind's upper hand. Wonderful reading. Easy and quick. ...

  • Chinmay
    Oct 06, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

    One would expect better from the author of "The Day of the Jackal." ...

    Book Review: The Fox by Frederick Forsyth Quite a disappointment to say the least, considering readers' excitement due mainly to the writer's name. This book is a globalist's pipe dream disguised as a thriller, a bit too clever by far. Very little of the story is centered on the ...

    Frederick Forsyth has done it again! Next to The Day of The Jackal, The Fox is the next best he has written! It is written in Frederick Forsyth style with exact detail to historical events which reminds me of things he pulled from The Dog of War, The Fist of God, The Afghan and T...

    Very disappointing I have really enjoyed some of his earlier books. This one was a huge let down. No character development to the point that you couldn?t care less if the main characters were all murdered half way through the novel. ...

    Does the job, disappointingly so... Highly up to date with the latest geopolitical events woven skillfully into the plot. Those who believe the official (US/UK) versions of things will enjoy themselves thoroughly. Those sceptical of postcolonialist and hegemonic politics, will frown...

    A select few authors are able to write a novel filled with cliches without making me cringe. Forsyth tend to be one of those. The book is certainly a cheap thriller where convenient coincidences turn the plot in every chapter. Still, it manages to create its own charm. The character...

    Worst Forsyth book ever written. The book was a horrible disappointment. The overarching plot can be at best described as genius boy waving his magic fingers to defeat all the enemies of the West using a computer. And I use the "magic" deliberately because though the book is about h...

  • Paul
    Nov 22, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

    One would expect better from the author of "The Day of the Jackal." ...

    Book Review: The Fox by Frederick Forsyth Quite a disappointment to say the least, considering readers' excitement due mainly to the writer's name. This book is a globalist's pipe dream disguised as a thriller, a bit too clever by far. Very little of the story is centered on the ...

    Frederick Forsyth has done it again! Next to The Day of The Jackal, The Fox is the next best he has written! It is written in Frederick Forsyth style with exact detail to historical events which reminds me of things he pulled from The Dog of War, The Fist of God, The Afghan and T...

    Very disappointing I have really enjoyed some of his earlier books. This one was a huge let down. No character development to the point that you couldn?t care less if the main characters were all murdered half way through the novel. ...

    Does the job, disappointingly so... Highly up to date with the latest geopolitical events woven skillfully into the plot. Those who believe the official (US/UK) versions of things will enjoy themselves thoroughly. Those sceptical of postcolonialist and hegemonic politics, will frown...

    A select few authors are able to write a novel filled with cliches without making me cringe. Forsyth tend to be one of those. The book is certainly a cheap thriller where convenient coincidences turn the plot in every chapter. Still, it manages to create its own charm. The character...

    Worst Forsyth book ever written. The book was a horrible disappointment. The overarching plot can be at best described as genius boy waving his magic fingers to defeat all the enemies of the West using a computer. And I use the "magic" deliberately because though the book is about h...

    Brain dead wish fulfilment fantasy. The British flicking everyone's noses. The hacking is dumber than in the dumbest Hollywood film. And everyone lived happily ever after. ...

  • Aniruddha Sengupta
    Nov 06, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

    One would expect better from the author of "The Day of the Jackal." ...

    Book Review: The Fox by Frederick Forsyth Quite a disappointment to say the least, considering readers' excitement due mainly to the writer's name. This book is a globalist's pipe dream disguised as a thriller, a bit too clever by far. Very little of the story is centered on the ...

    Frederick Forsyth has done it again! Next to The Day of The Jackal, The Fox is the next best he has written! It is written in Frederick Forsyth style with exact detail to historical events which reminds me of things he pulled from The Dog of War, The Fist of God, The Afghan and T...

    Very disappointing I have really enjoyed some of his earlier books. This one was a huge let down. No character development to the point that you couldn?t care less if the main characters were all murdered half way through the novel. ...

    Does the job, disappointingly so... Highly up to date with the latest geopolitical events woven skillfully into the plot. Those who believe the official (US/UK) versions of things will enjoy themselves thoroughly. Those sceptical of postcolonialist and hegemonic politics, will frown...

    A select few authors are able to write a novel filled with cliches without making me cringe. Forsyth tend to be one of those. The book is certainly a cheap thriller where convenient coincidences turn the plot in every chapter. Still, it manages to create its own charm. The character...

    Worst Forsyth book ever written. The book was a horrible disappointment. The overarching plot can be at best described as genius boy waving his magic fingers to defeat all the enemies of the West using a computer. And I use the "magic" deliberately because though the book is about h...

    Brain dead wish fulfilment fantasy. The British flicking everyone's noses. The hacking is dumber than in the dumbest Hollywood film. And everyone lived happily ever after. ...

    The best thing about this book is that it didn't take long to read. I remember being hugely impressed by "The Day of the Jackal" but that was long, long ago and I wonder if Forsyth himself actually wrote this at all. Wooden characters, a pathetic plot - I only kept reading to see how t...

    Terribly far-fetched and biased. Poorly researched and carelessly strung story. A sad comedown from an author, admired for the meticulous research that went into great thrillers like The Day of the Jackal ...

  • Stuart Ashenbrenner
    Oct 24, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

  • Linda Wells
    Dec 01, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

  • Ruth Jones
    Oct 01, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

  • Barry
    Dec 10, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

  • Clare O'Beara
    Nov 11, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

  • Adah Udechukwu
    Nov 28, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

  • Jawahar Surti
    Oct 04, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

  • J. F.
    Oct 30, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

    One would expect better from the author of "The Day of the Jackal." ...

    Book Review: The Fox by Frederick Forsyth Quite a disappointment to say the least, considering readers' excitement due mainly to the writer's name. This book is a globalist's pipe dream disguised as a thriller, a bit too clever by far. Very little of the story is centered on the ...

  • Doug
    Nov 25, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

  • Natalie Mullan
    Sep 30, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

  • Laura Spira
    Oct 17, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

    One would expect better from the author of "The Day of the Jackal." ...

    Book Review: The Fox by Frederick Forsyth Quite a disappointment to say the least, considering readers' excitement due mainly to the writer's name. This book is a globalist's pipe dream disguised as a thriller, a bit too clever by far. Very little of the story is centered on the ...

    Frederick Forsyth has done it again! Next to The Day of The Jackal, The Fox is the next best he has written! It is written in Frederick Forsyth style with exact detail to historical events which reminds me of things he pulled from The Dog of War, The Fist of God, The Afghan and T...

    Very disappointing I have really enjoyed some of his earlier books. This one was a huge let down. No character development to the point that you couldn?t care less if the main characters were all murdered half way through the novel. ...

    Does the job, disappointingly so... Highly up to date with the latest geopolitical events woven skillfully into the plot. Those who believe the official (US/UK) versions of things will enjoy themselves thoroughly. Those sceptical of postcolonialist and hegemonic politics, will frown...

    A select few authors are able to write a novel filled with cliches without making me cringe. Forsyth tend to be one of those. The book is certainly a cheap thriller where convenient coincidences turn the plot in every chapter. Still, it manages to create its own charm. The character...

    Worst Forsyth book ever written. The book was a horrible disappointment. The overarching plot can be at best described as genius boy waving his magic fingers to defeat all the enemies of the West using a computer. And I use the "magic" deliberately because though the book is about h...

    Brain dead wish fulfilment fantasy. The British flicking everyone's noses. The hacking is dumber than in the dumbest Hollywood film. And everyone lived happily ever after. ...

    The best thing about this book is that it didn't take long to read. I remember being hugely impressed by "The Day of the Jackal" but that was long, long ago and I wonder if Forsyth himself actually wrote this at all. Wooden characters, a pathetic plot - I only kept reading to see how t...

  • Brett
    Sep 20, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

  • Floyd Truskot
    Oct 29, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

    One would expect better from the author of "The Day of the Jackal." ...

    Book Review: The Fox by Frederick Forsyth Quite a disappointment to say the least, considering readers' excitement due mainly to the writer's name. This book is a globalist's pipe dream disguised as a thriller, a bit too clever by far. Very little of the story is centered on the ...

    Frederick Forsyth has done it again! Next to The Day of The Jackal, The Fox is the next best he has written! It is written in Frederick Forsyth style with exact detail to historical events which reminds me of things he pulled from The Dog of War, The Fist of God, The Afghan and T...

  • Ross Sidor
    Oct 24, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

  • monk
    Oct 31, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

    One would expect better from the author of "The Day of the Jackal." ...

    Book Review: The Fox by Frederick Forsyth Quite a disappointment to say the least, considering readers' excitement due mainly to the writer's name. This book is a globalist's pipe dream disguised as a thriller, a bit too clever by far. Very little of the story is centered on the ...

    Frederick Forsyth has done it again! Next to The Day of The Jackal, The Fox is the next best he has written! It is written in Frederick Forsyth style with exact detail to historical events which reminds me of things he pulled from The Dog of War, The Fist of God, The Afghan and T...

    Very disappointing I have really enjoyed some of his earlier books. This one was a huge let down. No character development to the point that you couldn?t care less if the main characters were all murdered half way through the novel. ...

    Does the job, disappointingly so... Highly up to date with the latest geopolitical events woven skillfully into the plot. Those who believe the official (US/UK) versions of things will enjoy themselves thoroughly. Those sceptical of postcolonialist and hegemonic politics, will frown...

    A select few authors are able to write a novel filled with cliches without making me cringe. Forsyth tend to be one of those. The book is certainly a cheap thriller where convenient coincidences turn the plot in every chapter. Still, it manages to create its own charm. The character...

  • Simon
    Sep 21, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

  • Alex Balkin
    Oct 29, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

    One would expect better from the author of "The Day of the Jackal." ...

    Book Review: The Fox by Frederick Forsyth Quite a disappointment to say the least, considering readers' excitement due mainly to the writer's name. This book is a globalist's pipe dream disguised as a thriller, a bit too clever by far. Very little of the story is centered on the ...

    Frederick Forsyth has done it again! Next to The Day of The Jackal, The Fox is the next best he has written! It is written in Frederick Forsyth style with exact detail to historical events which reminds me of things he pulled from The Dog of War, The Fist of God, The Afghan and T...

    Very disappointing I have really enjoyed some of his earlier books. This one was a huge let down. No character development to the point that you couldn?t care less if the main characters were all murdered half way through the novel. ...

    Does the job, disappointingly so... Highly up to date with the latest geopolitical events woven skillfully into the plot. Those who believe the official (US/UK) versions of things will enjoy themselves thoroughly. Those sceptical of postcolonialist and hegemonic politics, will frown...

  • BookGypsy
    Nov 06, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

  • Michael C. Baker
    Nov 30, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

    One would expect better from the author of "The Day of the Jackal." ...

    Book Review: The Fox by Frederick Forsyth Quite a disappointment to say the least, considering readers' excitement due mainly to the writer's name. This book is a globalist's pipe dream disguised as a thriller, a bit too clever by far. Very little of the story is centered on the ...

    Frederick Forsyth has done it again! Next to The Day of The Jackal, The Fox is the next best he has written! It is written in Frederick Forsyth style with exact detail to historical events which reminds me of things he pulled from The Dog of War, The Fist of God, The Afghan and T...

    Very disappointing I have really enjoyed some of his earlier books. This one was a huge let down. No character development to the point that you couldn?t care less if the main characters were all murdered half way through the novel. ...

  • Tony Le
    Nov 26, 2018

    Forsyth continues to master the international spy thriller in his latest book. "The Fox" has hacked into the NSA, and US and British agents join forces to find the hacker. The story is modern without relying on excessive technical detail. The scenario is both plausible and frightening....

    3.5 stars, rounded up (for all of his past accomplishments in this genre.) Someone has hacked into the impenetrable computer systems of the U.S. intelligence community. Turns out, it's a 18-year Brit, working in his attic with standard equipment, who awakens to find a team of black-cla...

    2.5 Stars at best! The epitome of average. I love Forsyth, some of my favourite works are his but this will not be one of them. It feels like a political rant in places, in others a review of world events. Through all this is an unrealistic, unbelievable, even ridiculous plot which has...

    The Fox is an average novel. The novel does not flow properly and it keeps referencing past events which was kinda annoying. ...

    I found this to be very realistic. It has a modern day international espionage. Very though provoking considering the state of our world affairs right now. When you thin an eight-teen -year old hacker could tap in a become a weapon and a target. A great read. I won a copy of this fr...

    Good, but thought the ending a bit lame. ...

    Not Such a Cunning Fox! For once, with this author, when a publisher puts extravagant claims in their blurb it's hard to argue. Frederick Forsyth has written some of the all-time thriller greats so deserves the ultimate respect. They suggest he defined the thriller genre so is he st...

    We?ve been enjoying Frederick Forsyth since his debut with ?The Day of the Jackal? in 1971. Unlike other popular authors, he doesn?t pump out a full-length novel every year, but rather has published a new international thriller at roughly three-to-five year intervals ? a span...

    Terrible book. Much like Wilbur Smith and Tom Clancy, Forsyth has entered the realm of successful thriller writers that allow publishers to ghost write books for them. This book has none of the style, or pace of of a Forsyth novel. There?s no depth to any of the characters and the pl...

    As a longtime fan of Forsyth, I was very interested in how he approached this tale of contemporary technological espionage without falling off the edge into tech speak and so forth. I respect his story telling skill ...The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Forth Protocol etc ... ...

    Once upon a time there was an autistic English boy that could hack Anything. He causes havoc in all the Bad places in the world and survives several attempts at assassination. He does all this within 7 months so he never gets any older. Then, because this is a fairy tale, he becomes a ...

    Actually 2.5/5 Picked this up with great expectations, having been a fan of Forsyth's novels. But was disappointed. The writing style is good enough, the flow, the language. But where is the story? (view spoiler)[You suddenly come across a hacker of all hackers and get impossible thin...

    Frederick Forsyth has been one of my favorite authors for many years although he seemed to have peaked with what may have been his first book, The Day of the Jackal. The result was that I hadn't read one of his novels in years but I decided to give The Fox a shot because I knew that, m...

    "This is what I've been missing, I've read two Tom Clancy books recently and have been really disappointed in how the writers who have continued his franchise have handled the series. Thank goodness for Frederick Forsyth, a writer that truly understands how espionage should be writte...

    This adventure centres on a teen lad with Asperger's who lives in his computer attic and hacks. Ah - no it doesn't. If it did he'd have lines, right? This adventure centres on a retired agent who is called back by a Theresa May lookalike to control the young hacker Luke and point him...

    Interesting premise, solid research, and informative detail, but lacking a cohesive story to weave it together. Basically an analysis of current global politics and how the UK might cyber-attacks against geopolitical foes, but it just jumps from one incident to another without an actua...

    Forsyth is 80-years-old, and he writes a book that is one of the most relevant and current pieces of mystery and thrill that there is available. I will skip over the synopsis of the book, but long story short, there is a young hacker, Luke Jennings, who assists in finding "The Fox". ...

    Thank you FREDERICK FORSYTH for writing THE FOX. Thank you G.P. Putnam's for publishing it. The 21st century has seen the birth of a new type warfare - cyberwarfare. Mr. Forsyth has produced a book whose plot seems to be ripped from major news headlines (not "fake news!"). Among th...

    One would expect better from the author of "The Day of the Jackal." ...