The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth and Other Curiosities from the History of Medicine

The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth and Other Curiosities from the History of Medicine

"Delightfully horrifying."--Popular Science One of Mental Floss's Best Books of 2018 One of Science Friday's Best Science Books of 2018 A mysterious epidemic of dental explosions? A teenage boy who got his wick stuck in a candlestick... A remarkable woman who, like a human fountain, spurted urine from virtually every orifice... These are just a few of the anecdotal gems t "Delightfully horrifying."--Popular Science One of Mental Floss's Best Books of 2018 One of Scie...

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Title:The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth and Other Curiosities from the History of Medicine
Author:Thomas Morris
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:400 pages pages

The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth and Other Curiosities from the History of Medicine Reviews

  • Susie
    Jan 16, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

  • Whitney
    Dec 27, 2018

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

  • Rach
    Jan 04, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

    This book was entertaining enough, but felt more like a series of blog entries. This could be because at least some of the stories *were* posted online at the author's website. I think this would have been a more interesting book if there had been some overarching narrative outside of ...

  • Annie
    Nov 13, 2018

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

  • Paul
    Dec 29, 2018

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

  • Jessi
    Feb 09, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

  • Janette
    Feb 02, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

    This book was entertaining enough, but felt more like a series of blog entries. This could be because at least some of the stories *were* posted online at the author's website. I think this would have been a more interesting book if there had been some overarching narrative outside of ...

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    Makes you appreciate the heck out of modern medical science. Entertaining read by medical historian Thomas Morris. A collection of weird, bizarre and nasty stories found in historic medical journals and books. Putting things in places they don't belong, it turns out, is something...

    Delightfully bizarre and engrossingly weird. A great gift choice for someone hard to buy for - that is, as long as they don't have a weak stomach! My only wish is that the ending hadn't petered out. If it had stuck the landing, that would have rounded out the book very well. ...

    An entertaining read of dubious authenticity. The events recounted usually cited obscure medical journals from the 16th and 17th century. However, I enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone interested in medicine as it was practiced a couple of hundred years ago, ...

    Started out very interesting/entertaining and continued to have some worthwhile anecdotes here and there. I also enjoyed the author's dry, British wit, but have to admit that the cases got rather tedious from time to time. However, it's still worth a read for anyone interested in this ...

  • Chris
    Jan 25, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

  • Viriam
    Jan 13, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

  • Stephanie
    Dec 20, 2018

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

  • Bill Bennett
    Feb 06, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

    This book was entertaining enough, but felt more like a series of blog entries. This could be because at least some of the stories *were* posted online at the author's website. I think this would have been a more interesting book if there had been some overarching narrative outside of ...

    ??????? ????? ? ??????????????? ????????? ?? ???????? ????????. ?????? ??????? ??????, ? ?????? ? ?? ???? ?????? ????? ??? ??? ???? ???????, ?? ? ?????, ?????...

    Makes you appreciate the heck out of modern medical science. Entertaining read by medical historian Thomas Morris. A collection of weird, bizarre and nasty stories found in historic medical journals and books. Putting things in places they don't belong, it turns out, is something...

    Delightfully bizarre and engrossingly weird. A great gift choice for someone hard to buy for - that is, as long as they don't have a weak stomach! My only wish is that the ending hadn't petered out. If it had stuck the landing, that would have rounded out the book very well. ...

    An entertaining read of dubious authenticity. The events recounted usually cited obscure medical journals from the 16th and 17th century. However, I enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone interested in medicine as it was practiced a couple of hundred years ago, ...

  • jammaster_mom
    Jan 06, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

  • ♥ Sandi ❣
    Dec 22, 2018

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

  • Jaime Oakeson
    Feb 04, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

    This book was entertaining enough, but felt more like a series of blog entries. This could be because at least some of the stories *were* posted online at the author's website. I think this would have been a more interesting book if there had been some overarching narrative outside of ...

    ??????? ????? ? ??????????????? ????????? ?? ???????? ????????. ?????? ??????? ??????, ? ?????? ? ?? ???? ?????? ????? ??? ??? ???? ???????, ?? ? ?????, ?????...

    Makes you appreciate the heck out of modern medical science. Entertaining read by medical historian Thomas Morris. A collection of weird, bizarre and nasty stories found in historic medical journals and books. Putting things in places they don't belong, it turns out, is something...

    Delightfully bizarre and engrossingly weird. A great gift choice for someone hard to buy for - that is, as long as they don't have a weak stomach! My only wish is that the ending hadn't petered out. If it had stuck the landing, that would have rounded out the book very well. ...

    An entertaining read of dubious authenticity. The events recounted usually cited obscure medical journals from the 16th and 17th century. However, I enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone interested in medicine as it was practiced a couple of hundred years ago, ...

    Started out very interesting/entertaining and continued to have some worthwhile anecdotes here and there. I also enjoyed the author's dry, British wit, but have to admit that the cases got rather tedious from time to time. However, it's still worth a read for anyone interested in this ...

    I am extremely grateful that I was not born before the dawn of the use of anesthetics during surgery. Yikes! Some of these "curiosities" are more curious than others, but all-in-all it was quite an interesting read. Again, yikes! ...

    Totally grawesome (grossly awesome)!! For about half of the stories I had to find someone to recount the bizarre details (willingly or otherwise), and the other half had a hard time holding my attention. ...

  • Filippe
    Dec 31, 2018

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

  • Karen
    Feb 14, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

  • Arun Croll
    Jan 12, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

    This book was entertaining enough, but felt more like a series of blog entries. This could be because at least some of the stories *were* posted online at the author's website. I think this would have been a more interesting book if there had been some overarching narrative outside of ...

    ??????? ????? ? ??????????????? ????????? ?? ???????? ????????. ?????? ??????? ??????, ? ?????? ? ?? ???? ?????? ????? ??? ??? ???? ???????, ?? ? ?????, ?????...

    Makes you appreciate the heck out of modern medical science. Entertaining read by medical historian Thomas Morris. A collection of weird, bizarre and nasty stories found in historic medical journals and books. Putting things in places they don't belong, it turns out, is something...

    Delightfully bizarre and engrossingly weird. A great gift choice for someone hard to buy for - that is, as long as they don't have a weak stomach! My only wish is that the ending hadn't petered out. If it had stuck the landing, that would have rounded out the book very well. ...

    An entertaining read of dubious authenticity. The events recounted usually cited obscure medical journals from the 16th and 17th century. However, I enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone interested in medicine as it was practiced a couple of hundred years ago, ...

    Started out very interesting/entertaining and continued to have some worthwhile anecdotes here and there. I also enjoyed the author's dry, British wit, but have to admit that the cases got rather tedious from time to time. However, it's still worth a read for anyone interested in this ...

    I am extremely grateful that I was not born before the dawn of the use of anesthetics during surgery. Yikes! Some of these "curiosities" are more curious than others, but all-in-all it was quite an interesting read. Again, yikes! ...

    Totally grawesome (grossly awesome)!! For about half of the stories I had to find someone to recount the bizarre details (willingly or otherwise), and the other half had a hard time holding my attention. ...

    Bizarre and amusing. Delivers on its premise. Not always great listening while eating a meal. ...

  • Koen
    Jan 29, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

    This book was entertaining enough, but felt more like a series of blog entries. This could be because at least some of the stories *were* posted online at the author's website. I think this would have been a more interesting book if there had been some overarching narrative outside of ...

    ??????? ????? ? ??????????????? ????????? ?? ???????? ????????. ?????? ??????? ??????, ? ?????? ? ?? ???? ?????? ????? ??? ??? ???? ???????, ?? ? ?????, ?????...

    Makes you appreciate the heck out of modern medical science. Entertaining read by medical historian Thomas Morris. A collection of weird, bizarre and nasty stories found in historic medical journals and books. Putting things in places they don't belong, it turns out, is something...

  • Karen
    Jan 14, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

    This book was entertaining enough, but felt more like a series of blog entries. This could be because at least some of the stories *were* posted online at the author's website. I think this would have been a more interesting book if there had been some overarching narrative outside of ...

    ??????? ????? ? ??????????????? ????????? ?? ???????? ????????. ?????? ??????? ??????, ? ?????? ? ?? ???? ?????? ????? ??? ??? ???? ???????, ?? ? ?????, ?????...

    Makes you appreciate the heck out of modern medical science. Entertaining read by medical historian Thomas Morris. A collection of weird, bizarre and nasty stories found in historic medical journals and books. Putting things in places they don't belong, it turns out, is something...

    Delightfully bizarre and engrossingly weird. A great gift choice for someone hard to buy for - that is, as long as they don't have a weak stomach! My only wish is that the ending hadn't petered out. If it had stuck the landing, that would have rounded out the book very well. ...

    An entertaining read of dubious authenticity. The events recounted usually cited obscure medical journals from the 16th and 17th century. However, I enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone interested in medicine as it was practiced a couple of hundred years ago, ...

    Started out very interesting/entertaining and continued to have some worthwhile anecdotes here and there. I also enjoyed the author's dry, British wit, but have to admit that the cases got rather tedious from time to time. However, it's still worth a read for anyone interested in this ...

    I am extremely grateful that I was not born before the dawn of the use of anesthetics during surgery. Yikes! Some of these "curiosities" are more curious than others, but all-in-all it was quite an interesting read. Again, yikes! ...

  • Diane Hernandez
    Dec 20, 2018

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

  • Linda Edmonds cerullo
    Jan 28, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

  • Gregory
    Jan 30, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

    This book was entertaining enough, but felt more like a series of blog entries. This could be because at least some of the stories *were* posted online at the author's website. I think this would have been a more interesting book if there had been some overarching narrative outside of ...

    ??????? ????? ? ??????????????? ????????? ?? ???????? ????????. ?????? ??????? ??????, ? ?????? ? ?? ???? ?????? ????? ??? ??? ???? ???????, ?? ? ?????, ?????...

    Makes you appreciate the heck out of modern medical science. Entertaining read by medical historian Thomas Morris. A collection of weird, bizarre and nasty stories found in historic medical journals and books. Putting things in places they don't belong, it turns out, is something...

    Delightfully bizarre and engrossingly weird. A great gift choice for someone hard to buy for - that is, as long as they don't have a weak stomach! My only wish is that the ending hadn't petered out. If it had stuck the landing, that would have rounded out the book very well. ...

    An entertaining read of dubious authenticity. The events recounted usually cited obscure medical journals from the 16th and 17th century. However, I enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone interested in medicine as it was practiced a couple of hundred years ago, ...

    Started out very interesting/entertaining and continued to have some worthwhile anecdotes here and there. I also enjoyed the author's dry, British wit, but have to admit that the cases got rather tedious from time to time. However, it's still worth a read for anyone interested in this ...

    I am extremely grateful that I was not born before the dawn of the use of anesthetics during surgery. Yikes! Some of these "curiosities" are more curious than others, but all-in-all it was quite an interesting read. Again, yikes! ...

    Totally grawesome (grossly awesome)!! For about half of the stories I had to find someone to recount the bizarre details (willingly or otherwise), and the other half had a hard time holding my attention. ...

    Bizarre and amusing. Delivers on its premise. Not always great listening while eating a meal. ...

    A fun book with amusing stories and although written well, it can get a bit repetitive. ...

    Kind of boring. ...

  • Katie Bee
    Dec 28, 2018

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

    This book was entertaining enough, but felt more like a series of blog entries. This could be because at least some of the stories *were* posted online at the author's website. I think this would have been a more interesting book if there had been some overarching narrative outside of ...

    ??????? ????? ? ??????????????? ????????? ?? ???????? ????????. ?????? ??????? ??????, ? ?????? ? ?? ???? ?????? ????? ??? ??? ???? ???????, ?? ? ?????, ?????...

    Makes you appreciate the heck out of modern medical science. Entertaining read by medical historian Thomas Morris. A collection of weird, bizarre and nasty stories found in historic medical journals and books. Putting things in places they don't belong, it turns out, is something...

    Delightfully bizarre and engrossingly weird. A great gift choice for someone hard to buy for - that is, as long as they don't have a weak stomach! My only wish is that the ending hadn't petered out. If it had stuck the landing, that would have rounded out the book very well. ...

  • Kathryn
    Feb 04, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

    This book was entertaining enough, but felt more like a series of blog entries. This could be because at least some of the stories *were* posted online at the author's website. I think this would have been a more interesting book if there had been some overarching narrative outside of ...

    ??????? ????? ? ??????????????? ????????? ?? ???????? ????????. ?????? ??????? ??????, ? ?????? ? ?? ???? ?????? ????? ??? ??? ???? ???????, ?? ? ?????, ?????...

    Makes you appreciate the heck out of modern medical science. Entertaining read by medical historian Thomas Morris. A collection of weird, bizarre and nasty stories found in historic medical journals and books. Putting things in places they don't belong, it turns out, is something...

    Delightfully bizarre and engrossingly weird. A great gift choice for someone hard to buy for - that is, as long as they don't have a weak stomach! My only wish is that the ending hadn't petered out. If it had stuck the landing, that would have rounded out the book very well. ...

    An entertaining read of dubious authenticity. The events recounted usually cited obscure medical journals from the 16th and 17th century. However, I enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone interested in medicine as it was practiced a couple of hundred years ago, ...

    Started out very interesting/entertaining and continued to have some worthwhile anecdotes here and there. I also enjoyed the author's dry, British wit, but have to admit that the cases got rather tedious from time to time. However, it's still worth a read for anyone interested in this ...

    I am extremely grateful that I was not born before the dawn of the use of anesthetics during surgery. Yikes! Some of these "curiosities" are more curious than others, but all-in-all it was quite an interesting read. Again, yikes! ...

    Totally grawesome (grossly awesome)!! For about half of the stories I had to find someone to recount the bizarre details (willingly or otherwise), and the other half had a hard time holding my attention. ...

    Bizarre and amusing. Delivers on its premise. Not always great listening while eating a meal. ...

    A fun book with amusing stories and although written well, it can get a bit repetitive. ...

    Kind of boring. ...

    3.5 ...

  • Mikhael
    Feb 11, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

    This book was entertaining enough, but felt more like a series of blog entries. This could be because at least some of the stories *were* posted online at the author's website. I think this would have been a more interesting book if there had been some overarching narrative outside of ...

    ??????? ????? ? ??????????????? ????????? ?? ???????? ????????. ?????? ??????? ??????, ? ?????? ? ?? ???? ?????? ????? ??? ??? ???? ???????, ?? ? ?????, ?????...

  • Casey Darnell
    Jan 31, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

  • Stephanie Lorentzen
    Jan 06, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

  • Yulia
    Feb 06, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

  • Megan Soulakham
    Dec 21, 2018

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

  • Claudia Murray
    Jan 05, 2019

    3.5 stars Wild and wacky! Just plain bizarre! Many cures for many illnesses that would turn your hair pure white if even suggested today. Written by a medical historian, this book delves back to the 19th century, assembled mostly through old medical journals and newspaper clippi...

    Medicine is an ever-evolving profession, and its history can be downright weird. Medical historian Thomas Morris has combed through countless vintage medical journals and historical documents showcasing the progress medicine has made in a relatively short time. His work goes beyond biz...

    There are many reasons that I am thankful that I was born when I was. My sex can vote. The FDA and the EPA exist. (For now.) Mostly, I am thankful for all the medical advances of the last century. I am thankful for antibiotics, antisepsis, and anesthetic. After reading Thomas Morris?...

    "Trying to impress your friends while under the influence of industrial quantities of alcohol is more often than not a really terrible idea. And more importantly, the correct answer to the question 'Can you swallow more knives?' is never 'All the knives aboard the ship.'" I love rea...

    I. Loved. This. Book. The subject matter couldn't be any more in my wheelhouse. The author writes with a great sense of humor and his translation/commentary of the historical documentation is almost always just as entertaining as the subject of the case. I gasped and groaned to my...

    Hugely entertaining. You?ll wince, cringe, groan, feel sorry for (most of) these poor souls and often find yourself appalled at the incompetence and recklessness of their physicians. Regular readers of Morris?s blog will be familiar with most of the cases and tales, but the book is...

    This book is not appropriate as bedtime reading... ...

    What People Will Do to the Human Body Inspires Mind-Boggling Medical History http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... Bizarre doesn?t begin to describe the history of medicine. I voluntarily reviewed an advance readers copy of this book. No remuneration was exchanged and all op...

    If there is a strange medical tale, it is recorded in the Mystery of the Exploding Teeth. With section titles like Unfortunate Predicaments, Mysterious Illnesses, and Horrifying Operations, how could this book be anything but a rollicking ride through the pages of bad choices. In Un...

    Another recently finished book on quack medication and medical care during Victorian times. This book wasn't near as hilarious as "Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything."I unfortunately read everything I can about this particular topic as I teach physiology and...

    The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth grabs you with it's intriguing title, locks you in with its horrifying first paragraph and without skipping a beat, sucks you down into a black hole of unimaginable medical horror, keeping a fast clip of story after story of relentless suffering until...

    Very entertaining and, at times, unbelievable account of medicine through the years. The author has a marvelous way of finding humor in sometimes gut-wrenching and appalling treatments and conditions. Difficult to believe that doctors once thought it was wise to nearly bleed people to ...

    This is an exceptionally well written book about the oddities of the human condition and medicine as a discipline over the centuries. There are many stories that the author has tried to verify, or at least to verify the reporting person, broken up into several different categories. The...

    I thought this book was an enjoyable read. Thomas Morris tells the tales of medical history's weirdest and wildest cases. These stories are compiled in a similar fashion to a Guiness Book which makes them very interesting read. I'm a slow reader and ended up reading over half of the bo...

    The title of this book will draw almost anyone in. Exploding teeth? Cool. And this author does put together a very nice collection of medical mysteries from the early days of human history. He includes scans of newspaper and journal articles and provides interpretations for words and p...

    This book is a ton of fun for those who like medical stories of old...if only to realize how far medicine has actually come. I picked it up in the UK, and the author focuses primarily on very very bizarre cases from old medical journals, from the 1600s onward. These short stories are w...

    I thought the stories were interesting - so props to the author for gathering such ludicrous medical cases. However, I didn?t care at ALL for the author?s writing style. The stories themselves are pulled from medical journals, and his main contribution to the book was chiming in co...

    A fun quick page turner. That these oddities came to light while the author was doing medical research is facinating. Some of the stories are over long but the fact thet they are from medical journals gives them a depth that goes beyond the Ripley's approach. Makes me glad for the prog...

    This book was entertaining enough, but felt more like a series of blog entries. This could be because at least some of the stories *were* posted online at the author's website. I think this would have been a more interesting book if there had been some overarching narrative outside of ...

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    Makes you appreciate the heck out of modern medical science. Entertaining read by medical historian Thomas Morris. A collection of weird, bizarre and nasty stories found in historic medical journals and books. Putting things in places they don't belong, it turns out, is something...

    Delightfully bizarre and engrossingly weird. A great gift choice for someone hard to buy for - that is, as long as they don't have a weak stomach! My only wish is that the ending hadn't petered out. If it had stuck the landing, that would have rounded out the book very well. ...

    An entertaining read of dubious authenticity. The events recounted usually cited obscure medical journals from the 16th and 17th century. However, I enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone interested in medicine as it was practiced a couple of hundred years ago, ...

    Started out very interesting/entertaining and continued to have some worthwhile anecdotes here and there. I also enjoyed the author's dry, British wit, but have to admit that the cases got rather tedious from time to time. However, it's still worth a read for anyone interested in this ...

    I am extremely grateful that I was not born before the dawn of the use of anesthetics during surgery. Yikes! Some of these "curiosities" are more curious than others, but all-in-all it was quite an interesting read. Again, yikes! ...

    Totally grawesome (grossly awesome)!! For about half of the stories I had to find someone to recount the bizarre details (willingly or otherwise), and the other half had a hard time holding my attention. ...

    Bizarre and amusing. Delivers on its premise. Not always great listening while eating a meal. ...

    A fun book with amusing stories and although written well, it can get a bit repetitive. ...