In My Father's House: A New View of How Crime Runs in the Family

In My Father's House: A New View of How Crime Runs in the Family

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist: a path-breaking examination of our huge crime and incarceration problem that looks at the influence of the family--specifically one Oregon family with a generations-long legacy of lawlessness. The United States currently holds the distinction of housing nearly one-quarter of the world's prison population. But our re From the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist: a path-breaking examination of our huge crime and incarcer...

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Title:In My Father's House: A New View of How Crime Runs in the Family
Author:Fox Butterfield
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:In My Father's House: A New View of How Crime Runs in the Family
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:288 pages pages

In My Father's House: A New View of How Crime Runs in the Family Reviews

  • Beth
    Sep 29, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

  • Ray
    Apr 26, 2019

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    Butterfield's book, "In My Father's House" gives new meaning to the term "crime family". The author has made a study of how criminal behavior can extend throughout entire families and over generations. Possibly, this book may change your mind about believing that criminal behavior is m...

  • Colleen
    Nov 02, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

  • (a)lyss(a)
    Aug 24, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

  • kelly
    Nov 11, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

  • Ariel
    Jan 07, 2019

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

  • Deb
    Sep 24, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

  • Terri
    Sep 18, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

  • LeeAnne
    Dec 22, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

  • Amanda
    Jan 16, 2019

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

  • Kia
    Oct 01, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

  • Mary
    Sep 29, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

  • Leigh
    Dec 30, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    Butterfield's book, "In My Father's House" gives new meaning to the term "crime family". The author has made a study of how criminal behavior can extend throughout entire families and over generations. Possibly, this book may change your mind about believing that criminal behavior is m...

    This is an amazing book that I hope many in the criminal justice will take the time to read. As the author, Fox Butterfield, states, "As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crimes and 10 percent account for two thirds." As I read I wondered if it was nature vs. nurture...

    Absolutely captivating book. Butterfield details the family history of the Bogles in a very easy-to-read fashion. Butterfield did a phenominal job of presenting the whole of this families experiences dating back as far as the mid 1800's while insightfully using them as teaching points ...

    3.5 stars. The story is compelling, but it's not as well-written as "All God's Children" and the framing devices (theories of crime like social learning theory) and paragraphs on various studies that might help to explain this family's criminality feel misplaced and distract from the s...

  • Olga Zelenova
    Oct 03, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

  • Rana
    Apr 09, 2019

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

  • Kim
    Feb 20, 2019

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    Butterfield's book, "In My Father's House" gives new meaning to the term "crime family". The author has made a study of how criminal behavior can extend throughout entire families and over generations. Possibly, this book may change your mind about believing that criminal behavior is m...

    This is an amazing book that I hope many in the criminal justice will take the time to read. As the author, Fox Butterfield, states, "As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crimes and 10 percent account for two thirds." As I read I wondered if it was nature vs. nurture...

    Absolutely captivating book. Butterfield details the family history of the Bogles in a very easy-to-read fashion. Butterfield did a phenominal job of presenting the whole of this families experiences dating back as far as the mid 1800's while insightfully using them as teaching points ...

    3.5 stars. The story is compelling, but it's not as well-written as "All God's Children" and the framing devices (theories of crime like social learning theory) and paragraphs on various studies that might help to explain this family's criminality feel misplaced and distract from the s...

    This was an interesting read, however, after the initial few chapters there wasn't anything more added except to further reinforce the initial premise by giving more and more examples of the same. Its definitely a book that needs to be read though, specially for those of us who mistake...

    Excellent book! I sometimes skipped over Butterfield's discussion of crime statistics, as I was more interested in the family. If we agree that good moral values are passed down through families, it shouldn't surprise us that bad moral values would also be passed down through famil...

    Good book but I personally didn't feel that it lived up to the hype. It's interesting to read about one family's history and life of crime but nothing in the book had the kind of depth I was hoping for. I completely understand why other people would really like this book, but I thought...

  • Laura
    Sep 18, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

  • Peg
    Jan 10, 2019

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    Butterfield's book, "In My Father's House" gives new meaning to the term "crime family". The author has made a study of how criminal behavior can extend throughout entire families and over generations. Possibly, this book may change your mind about believing that criminal behavior is m...

    This is an amazing book that I hope many in the criminal justice will take the time to read. As the author, Fox Butterfield, states, "As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crimes and 10 percent account for two thirds." As I read I wondered if it was nature vs. nurture...

    Absolutely captivating book. Butterfield details the family history of the Bogles in a very easy-to-read fashion. Butterfield did a phenominal job of presenting the whole of this families experiences dating back as far as the mid 1800's while insightfully using them as teaching points ...

    3.5 stars. The story is compelling, but it's not as well-written as "All God's Children" and the framing devices (theories of crime like social learning theory) and paragraphs on various studies that might help to explain this family's criminality feel misplaced and distract from the s...

    This was an interesting read, however, after the initial few chapters there wasn't anything more added except to further reinforce the initial premise by giving more and more examples of the same. Its definitely a book that needs to be read though, specially for those of us who mistake...

    Excellent book! I sometimes skipped over Butterfield's discussion of crime statistics, as I was more interested in the family. If we agree that good moral values are passed down through families, it shouldn't surprise us that bad moral values would also be passed down through famil...

  • Patrick Macke
    Oct 31, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

  • Mansi
    Apr 14, 2019

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    Butterfield's book, "In My Father's House" gives new meaning to the term "crime family". The author has made a study of how criminal behavior can extend throughout entire families and over generations. Possibly, this book may change your mind about believing that criminal behavior is m...

    This is an amazing book that I hope many in the criminal justice will take the time to read. As the author, Fox Butterfield, states, "As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crimes and 10 percent account for two thirds." As I read I wondered if it was nature vs. nurture...

    Absolutely captivating book. Butterfield details the family history of the Bogles in a very easy-to-read fashion. Butterfield did a phenominal job of presenting the whole of this families experiences dating back as far as the mid 1800's while insightfully using them as teaching points ...

    3.5 stars. The story is compelling, but it's not as well-written as "All God's Children" and the framing devices (theories of crime like social learning theory) and paragraphs on various studies that might help to explain this family's criminality feel misplaced and distract from the s...

    This was an interesting read, however, after the initial few chapters there wasn't anything more added except to further reinforce the initial premise by giving more and more examples of the same. Its definitely a book that needs to be read though, specially for those of us who mistake...

  • Angela
    Nov 20, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

  • Holly Barker
    Sep 30, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

  • Amy Knox
    Nov 09, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

  • Chris Waraksa
    Nov 03, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

  • Wanda Keith
    Feb 07, 2019

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    Butterfield's book, "In My Father's House" gives new meaning to the term "crime family". The author has made a study of how criminal behavior can extend throughout entire families and over generations. Possibly, this book may change your mind about believing that criminal behavior is m...

    This is an amazing book that I hope many in the criminal justice will take the time to read. As the author, Fox Butterfield, states, "As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crimes and 10 percent account for two thirds." As I read I wondered if it was nature vs. nurture...

  • Angela Gibson
    Sep 04, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

  • Chaz
    Nov 26, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

  • Tim Rearer
    Jan 21, 2019

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    The title and description of this book are very misleading. This is not a book about how crime runs in families. (<-plural) This is just a biography of anecdotal evidence from one family of criminals. The best part of this book is the shocking statistics in the introduction:...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    Butterfield's book, "In My Father's House" gives new meaning to the term "crime family". The author has made a study of how criminal behavior can extend throughout entire families and over generations. Possibly, this book may change your mind about believing that criminal behavior is m...

    This is an amazing book that I hope many in the criminal justice will take the time to read. As the author, Fox Butterfield, states, "As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crimes and 10 percent account for two thirds." As I read I wondered if it was nature vs. nurture...

    Absolutely captivating book. Butterfield details the family history of the Bogles in a very easy-to-read fashion. Butterfield did a phenominal job of presenting the whole of this families experiences dating back as far as the mid 1800's while insightfully using them as teaching points ...

  • Victoria Johnson
    Oct 06, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    Guys. This was a book club pick and I didn't finish it. And I am refusing to finish it. Just ain't got time to hear more veiled racism from some white guy who doesn't know the difference between Portland State University and the University of Oregon. If he and his researchers screw up ...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    Fox Butterfield put in ten years of interviews with at least 30 members of the Bogle family, a colorful criminal clan well known to law enforcement and correctional institutions in several Western states. Their testimony and the details of their personal stories make the book absorbing...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    I think the subtitle for this book is misleading -- because this book is mostly storytelling with a tiny bit of research. Overall, that wasn't a bad thing, because it's pretty fascinating storytelling. Reading about this particular family's inability to resist criminal behavior was bot...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

  • Paige Jeanty
    Sep 30, 2018

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...