In My Father's House: A New View of How Crime Runs in the Family

In My Father's House: A New View of How Crime Runs in the Family

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist: a path-breaking examination of our huge crime and incarceration problem that looks at the influence of the family--specifically one Oregon family with a generations-long legacy of lawlessness. The United States currently holds the distinction of housing nearly one-quarter of the world's prison population. But our re From the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist: a path-breaking examination of our huge crime and incarcer...

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Title:In My Father's House: A New View of How Crime Runs in the Family
Author:Fox Butterfield
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:In My Father's House: A New View of How Crime Runs in the Family
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:288 pages pages

In My Father's House: A New View of How Crime Runs in the Family Reviews

  • Beth
    Sep 29, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

  • Rebecca Tolley
    Nov 06, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    A detailed book on the Bogle family and its descendants in the study of criminology. This is an informative account of one family, generation by generation, crimes committed and time served in prison. Thank you to First to Read, Penguin Books for the chance to read this book. ...

    Pretty interesting discussion of crime and families. ...

    ...

  • Colleen
    Nov 02, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

  • Eugenia
    Sep 30, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    A detailed book on the Bogle family and its descendants in the study of criminology. This is an informative account of one family, generation by generation, crimes committed and time served in prison. Thank you to First to Read, Penguin Books for the chance to read this book. ...

    Pretty interesting discussion of crime and families. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • (a)lyss(a)
    Aug 24, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

  • kelly
    Nov 11, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

  • Deb
    Sep 24, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

  • Terri
    Sep 18, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

  • Sarah
    Oct 25, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    A detailed book on the Bogle family and its descendants in the study of criminology. This is an informative account of one family, generation by generation, crimes committed and time served in prison. Thank you to First to Read, Penguin Books for the chance to read this book. ...

    Pretty interesting discussion of crime and families. ...

    ...

    ...

  • Kia
    Oct 01, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

  • Carol
    Dec 06, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    A detailed book on the Bogle family and its descendants in the study of criminology. This is an informative account of one family, generation by generation, crimes committed and time served in prison. Thank you to First to Read, Penguin Books for the chance to read this book. ...

    Pretty interesting discussion of crime and families. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Charlie
    Oct 07, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    A detailed book on the Bogle family and its descendants in the study of criminology. This is an informative account of one family, generation by generation, crimes committed and time served in prison. Thank you to First to Read, Penguin Books for the chance to read this book. ...

    Pretty interesting discussion of crime and families. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Mary
    Sep 29, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

  • Olga Zelenova
    Oct 03, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

  • Laura
    Sep 18, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

  • Anne
    Nov 24, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    A detailed book on the Bogle family and its descendants in the study of criminology. This is an informative account of one family, generation by generation, crimes committed and time served in prison. Thank you to First to Read, Penguin Books for the chance to read this book. ...

    Pretty interesting discussion of crime and families. ...

  • Cathy
    Sep 13, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    A detailed book on the Bogle family and its descendants in the study of criminology. This is an informative account of one family, generation by generation, crimes committed and time served in prison. Thank you to First to Read, Penguin Books for the chance to read this book. ...

    Pretty interesting discussion of crime and families. ...

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  • Patrick Macke
    Oct 31, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

  • Angela
    Nov 20, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

  • Yesenia
    Sep 23, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    A detailed book on the Bogle family and its descendants in the study of criminology. This is an informative account of one family, generation by generation, crimes committed and time served in prison. Thank you to First to Read, Penguin Books for the chance to read this book. ...

    Pretty interesting discussion of crime and families. ...

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  • Mike
    Sep 18, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    A detailed book on the Bogle family and its descendants in the study of criminology. This is an informative account of one family, generation by generation, crimes committed and time served in prison. Thank you to First to Read, Penguin Books for the chance to read this book. ...

    Pretty interesting discussion of crime and families. ...

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    ...

    ...

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  • Holly Barker
    Sep 30, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

  • Susan Elizabetha
    Sep 25, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    A detailed book on the Bogle family and its descendants in the study of criminology. This is an informative account of one family, generation by generation, crimes committed and time served in prison. Thank you to First to Read, Penguin Books for the chance to read this book. ...

  • Amy Knox
    Nov 09, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

  • Chris Waraksa
    Nov 03, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

  • Lauren Maclachlan
    Nov 30, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

    Using that data of 10% of families account for 2/3 of all crime as a jumping off point, Butterfield follows the (white) Bogle family from their origins in Texas to their move to Oregon. Overall, 60 members of this family have been incarcerated. Drawing on the ideas of learned behavior,...

    This is a fascinating look at how crime "travels" through families, providing a close look at one family throughout several generations, over 60 members of which ended up in jail/prison at one time or another. It is clear that Butterfield was passionate about his topic and meticulously...

    My Father?s House by Fox Butterfield follows the criminal history of the Bogle Family who have had 60 of their family members incarcerated. Is there a ?Crime? gene? Are they criminals because of a mental illness thread running throughout their family? Or is it solely their enviro...

    "One time he made Tony get drunk and then ordered him to box his much larger father." I received a copy of this ebook from firsttoread.com in exchange for an honest review. This is a brutal and fascinating book. Following the Bogle family (including extended family) the autho...

    This was a shocking and sad chronology of a family with more than 60 members (over 4 generations) who've been sent to jail, sent to prison, and/or put on probation or parole. While the book touches somewhat on the nature vs. nurture debate and poses a lot of thought-provoking questions...

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is an interesting view of how crime follows generation after generation in a family. This is interesting because in this theory, it is white families, not blacks. In this theory, people are not give...

    Thank you to Penguin Random House and First to Read for the Advance Galley un exchange for an honest and unbiased review. My Father's House by Fox Butterfield is the non-fiction story of the Bogle family. The family has had 60 members incarcerated. Butterfield uses interviews with ...

    This book left me with an internal conflict - I can't decide if I'm hopeful or discouraged by what I've learned about the Bogle family. Probably a little bit of both. Book received via First To Read. ...

    A detailed book on the Bogle family and its descendants in the study of criminology. This is an informative account of one family, generation by generation, crimes committed and time served in prison. Thank you to First to Read, Penguin Books for the chance to read this book. ...

    Pretty interesting discussion of crime and families. ...

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  • Angela Gibson
    Sep 04, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

  • Chaz
    Nov 26, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

  • Victoria Johnson
    Oct 06, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...

    Holy crap. All I can say is I am glad I am not in THAT family. Reading this book is akin to watching a slow motion train wreck. The completely misaligned family honor code is hard to comprehend, but this was a fascinating look at family ties influence crime, and how our criminal justic...

    A fascinating look at how crime runs in families by looking at one family and the generations of incarceration, poverty, poor education and poor role modeling and how every family member ends up incarcerated. This was an incredible read! ...

    In My Father's House confronts nature and nurture, racism, family history as it chronicles a family with multiple generations and multiple family members who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from theft to murder. It was disconcerting to read of the pride when fathers would realize t...

    This well-written nonfiction book begins with a very interesting statistic: that "5 percent of American families account for half of all crime, 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This point is driven throughout the entire book with Mr. Butterfield's multi-generational docu...

    Fascinating topic, though some of the "according to studies" portions slowed it down. It's the often-wrenching Bogle family stories that kept me reading. And maybe a shred of hope that someone would have a good outcome. Even the few who didn't end up on the criminal path led bitterswee...

    This book is built around a rather startling statistic: "5 percent of families in America account for half of all crime and 10 percent of families account for two thirds." This book then goes on to illustrate how crime can run in families by focusing on one particular rather impoverish...

    New York Times reporter spent years investigating this family and interviewing them. Generations of criminals, impulsive, charming, terrifying, drunks, drug addicts, truants. The US prison system gave up tracking families of criminals when the Eugenics Movement was discredited along wi...

    This book is interesting in the same way down-and-out reality TV shows and gnarly car wrecks are interesting ... It is sad and depressing and, in a certain way, disgusting that some are willfully breeding criminals ... The conclusion - that if you are raised by and around criminals tha...

    Rating: 4 Stars Days it Took to Read: 7 Review: This was a powerful read. It truly shows how the environment you grow up in can affect your entire life for better or worse. In this nonfiction piece, Butterfield follows the Bogle family and shares their "curse." One couple's cho...

  • Paige Jeanty
    Sep 30, 2018

    Fox Butterfield has written an expose of sorts. With all the books written in the past decade about rampant crime and police brutality, specifically regarding the black community, Butterfield takes a different tack and suggests a large part of the prison population, regardless of color...

    "Our reliance on mass incarceration, Fox Butterfield argues, misses the intractable reality: As few as 5 percent of families account for half of all crime, and only 10 percent account for two-thirds." Butterfield introduces the reader to the Bogle family, and chronicles the four gener...