The Big Picture: The Fight for the Future of Movies

The Big Picture: The Fight for the Future of Movies

The stunning metamorphosis of twenty-first-century Hollywood and what lies ahead for the art and commerce of film. In the past decade, Hollywood has endured a cataclysm on a par with the end of silent film and the demise of the studio system. Stars and directors have seen their power dwindle, while writers and producers lift their best techniques from TV, comic books, and The stunning metamorphosis of twenty-first-century Hollywood and what lies ahead for the art and commerce of film. ...

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Title:The Big Picture: The Fight for the Future of Movies
Author:Ben Fritz
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:B073XBSMVY
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:309 pages pages

The Big Picture: The Fight for the Future of Movies Reviews

  • John
    Jun 12, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

    An incisive -- and chilling -- look at Hollywood today. I worked in the industry when studios would release a diverse slate of 25-30 pictures a year: mid-budget dramas, comedies, rom-coms, thrillers, etc. Now the author tells us that studios are focused on a few "big tentpoles" a year...

    Very interesting examination of the current state Hollywood, very much a good news/bad news thing. The good news is that Hollywood is making product that, apparently, people want to see. The bad news is that the big studios have become franchise machines, only interested in making supe...

    Excellent read for those interested in the current climate in Hollywood, one that favors massive cinematic universes and movies with explosions, while giving short shrift to anything that doesn't include killer robots. The author explores the current players in Hollywood, including the...

    A timely look at what is happening in the Hollywood and the movie industry. Why are there so many superhero films, and what does this mean for the industry and for us as fans? As Ben Fritz explains, we?ve moved from star vehicles to franchises, and now to ?universes? - for exampl...

    This is largely, a Bell's End Shakes Fist at Cloud. This is basically preaching to the choir of anyone who has disliked and/or bored with all the franchising work that's been happening over the past decade or so. I'm a big fan of Peter Biskind, so this felt like a voice in the void...

  • Buzz Andersen
    Aug 17, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

  • Paul Fuhr
    Apr 08, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

    An incisive -- and chilling -- look at Hollywood today. I worked in the industry when studios would release a diverse slate of 25-30 pictures a year: mid-budget dramas, comedies, rom-coms, thrillers, etc. Now the author tells us that studios are focused on a few "big tentpoles" a year...

    Very interesting examination of the current state Hollywood, very much a good news/bad news thing. The good news is that Hollywood is making product that, apparently, people want to see. The bad news is that the big studios have become franchise machines, only interested in making supe...

    Excellent read for those interested in the current climate in Hollywood, one that favors massive cinematic universes and movies with explosions, while giving short shrift to anything that doesn't include killer robots. The author explores the current players in Hollywood, including the...

    A timely look at what is happening in the Hollywood and the movie industry. Why are there so many superhero films, and what does this mean for the industry and for us as fans? As Ben Fritz explains, we?ve moved from star vehicles to franchises, and now to ?universes? - for exampl...

    This is largely, a Bell's End Shakes Fist at Cloud. This is basically preaching to the choir of anyone who has disliked and/or bored with all the franchising work that's been happening over the past decade or so. I'm a big fan of Peter Biskind, so this felt like a voice in the void...

    Loved this from cover to cover. A page turner, even though it is non-fiction. Maybe it is because I am such a movie business nerd. STAY AWAY FROM THIS IF YOU LOVE MOVIES. It is a bleak, depressing outlook on what has happened to the movie industry. The themes and overall messages in he...

    It's economics stupid! If you have half a brain you know what happened to movies. If not, and you need it explained to you, Than this book is for you. Or if you just don't have time to invest in pop culture to be able to use your brain, but then you probably don't have time to read thi...

    Captures the evolution of the cinema business over the past couple of decades and does so without being bitter about perceived decline in the art of movie making (in favour for big budget franchises that are easily understandable across various cultures). In fact it is overall an optim...

    Nice update on how this part of the culture industry has been changing. Especially interesting is this shift within the public sphere from synchronous experience of movie events, enabling exchanges and dialogue about stories with a common, timely reference to the decline of the same, t...

    A fascinating look at the effects of the impact of globalisation and technological change on one of America?s prestige industries/institutions. Valuable not just for the way the story is told?breezily, but also in the wider lessons to be drawn: the growing impact of tech firms and ...

    Fascinating read about the changed landscape of filmed entertainment, its societal implications and reflections, the death of ?the movie star,? and why movie theaters feature so many superhero movies. It also charges the American public with largely abandoning the communal experien...

  • Kate
    Aug 14, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

  • Paul Grech
    Mar 18, 2019

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

    An incisive -- and chilling -- look at Hollywood today. I worked in the industry when studios would release a diverse slate of 25-30 pictures a year: mid-budget dramas, comedies, rom-coms, thrillers, etc. Now the author tells us that studios are focused on a few "big tentpoles" a year...

    Very interesting examination of the current state Hollywood, very much a good news/bad news thing. The good news is that Hollywood is making product that, apparently, people want to see. The bad news is that the big studios have become franchise machines, only interested in making supe...

    Excellent read for those interested in the current climate in Hollywood, one that favors massive cinematic universes and movies with explosions, while giving short shrift to anything that doesn't include killer robots. The author explores the current players in Hollywood, including the...

    A timely look at what is happening in the Hollywood and the movie industry. Why are there so many superhero films, and what does this mean for the industry and for us as fans? As Ben Fritz explains, we?ve moved from star vehicles to franchises, and now to ?universes? - for exampl...

    This is largely, a Bell's End Shakes Fist at Cloud. This is basically preaching to the choir of anyone who has disliked and/or bored with all the franchising work that's been happening over the past decade or so. I'm a big fan of Peter Biskind, so this felt like a voice in the void...

    Loved this from cover to cover. A page turner, even though it is non-fiction. Maybe it is because I am such a movie business nerd. STAY AWAY FROM THIS IF YOU LOVE MOVIES. It is a bleak, depressing outlook on what has happened to the movie industry. The themes and overall messages in he...

    It's economics stupid! If you have half a brain you know what happened to movies. If not, and you need it explained to you, Than this book is for you. Or if you just don't have time to invest in pop culture to be able to use your brain, but then you probably don't have time to read thi...

    Captures the evolution of the cinema business over the past couple of decades and does so without being bitter about perceived decline in the art of movie making (in favour for big budget franchises that are easily understandable across various cultures). In fact it is overall an optim...

  • Michael Ritchie
    Apr 22, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

    An incisive -- and chilling -- look at Hollywood today. I worked in the industry when studios would release a diverse slate of 25-30 pictures a year: mid-budget dramas, comedies, rom-coms, thrillers, etc. Now the author tells us that studios are focused on a few "big tentpoles" a year...

    Very interesting examination of the current state Hollywood, very much a good news/bad news thing. The good news is that Hollywood is making product that, apparently, people want to see. The bad news is that the big studios have become franchise machines, only interested in making supe...

  • Matt Arena
    Mar 12, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

  • Kim Pallister
    Jan 27, 2019

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

  • Daniel
    May 28, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

  • Jake
    May 04, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

    An incisive -- and chilling -- look at Hollywood today. I worked in the industry when studios would release a diverse slate of 25-30 pictures a year: mid-budget dramas, comedies, rom-coms, thrillers, etc. Now the author tells us that studios are focused on a few "big tentpoles" a year...

    Very interesting examination of the current state Hollywood, very much a good news/bad news thing. The good news is that Hollywood is making product that, apparently, people want to see. The bad news is that the big studios have become franchise machines, only interested in making supe...

    Excellent read for those interested in the current climate in Hollywood, one that favors massive cinematic universes and movies with explosions, while giving short shrift to anything that doesn't include killer robots. The author explores the current players in Hollywood, including the...

    A timely look at what is happening in the Hollywood and the movie industry. Why are there so many superhero films, and what does this mean for the industry and for us as fans? As Ben Fritz explains, we?ve moved from star vehicles to franchises, and now to ?universes? - for exampl...

    This is largely, a Bell's End Shakes Fist at Cloud. This is basically preaching to the choir of anyone who has disliked and/or bored with all the franchising work that's been happening over the past decade or so. I'm a big fan of Peter Biskind, so this felt like a voice in the void...

    Loved this from cover to cover. A page turner, even though it is non-fiction. Maybe it is because I am such a movie business nerd. STAY AWAY FROM THIS IF YOU LOVE MOVIES. It is a bleak, depressing outlook on what has happened to the movie industry. The themes and overall messages in he...

    It's economics stupid! If you have half a brain you know what happened to movies. If not, and you need it explained to you, Than this book is for you. Or if you just don't have time to invest in pop culture to be able to use your brain, but then you probably don't have time to read thi...

    Captures the evolution of the cinema business over the past couple of decades and does so without being bitter about perceived decline in the art of movie making (in favour for big budget franchises that are easily understandable across various cultures). In fact it is overall an optim...

    Nice update on how this part of the culture industry has been changing. Especially interesting is this shift within the public sphere from synchronous experience of movie events, enabling exchanges and dialogue about stories with a common, timely reference to the decline of the same, t...

    A fascinating look at the effects of the impact of globalisation and technological change on one of America?s prestige industries/institutions. Valuable not just for the way the story is told?breezily, but also in the wider lessons to be drawn: the growing impact of tech firms and ...

    Fascinating read about the changed landscape of filmed entertainment, its societal implications and reflections, the death of ?the movie star,? and why movie theaters feature so many superhero movies. It also charges the American public with largely abandoning the communal experien...

    Book is very thin in material. Parts of it are interesting but author has a habit of repeating points over and over again in the same paragraph. Most the info comes from the stolen e-mails from the Sony hack, which means most of the book is about Sony, because that's most of where the ...

  • Louise
    Aug 04, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

  • Greg Enslen
    May 22, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

    An incisive -- and chilling -- look at Hollywood today. I worked in the industry when studios would release a diverse slate of 25-30 pictures a year: mid-budget dramas, comedies, rom-coms, thrillers, etc. Now the author tells us that studios are focused on a few "big tentpoles" a year...

    Very interesting examination of the current state Hollywood, very much a good news/bad news thing. The good news is that Hollywood is making product that, apparently, people want to see. The bad news is that the big studios have become franchise machines, only interested in making supe...

    Excellent read for those interested in the current climate in Hollywood, one that favors massive cinematic universes and movies with explosions, while giving short shrift to anything that doesn't include killer robots. The author explores the current players in Hollywood, including the...

  • Niamh
    Jan 18, 2019

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

  • Sara Goldenberg
    Apr 05, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

  • Amy Wolf
    Apr 22, 2019

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

    An incisive -- and chilling -- look at Hollywood today. I worked in the industry when studios would release a diverse slate of 25-30 pictures a year: mid-budget dramas, comedies, rom-coms, thrillers, etc. Now the author tells us that studios are focused on a few "big tentpoles" a year...

  • Jbussen
    Aug 21, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

    An incisive -- and chilling -- look at Hollywood today. I worked in the industry when studios would release a diverse slate of 25-30 pictures a year: mid-budget dramas, comedies, rom-coms, thrillers, etc. Now the author tells us that studios are focused on a few "big tentpoles" a year...

    Very interesting examination of the current state Hollywood, very much a good news/bad news thing. The good news is that Hollywood is making product that, apparently, people want to see. The bad news is that the big studios have become franchise machines, only interested in making supe...

    Excellent read for those interested in the current climate in Hollywood, one that favors massive cinematic universes and movies with explosions, while giving short shrift to anything that doesn't include killer robots. The author explores the current players in Hollywood, including the...

    A timely look at what is happening in the Hollywood and the movie industry. Why are there so many superhero films, and what does this mean for the industry and for us as fans? As Ben Fritz explains, we?ve moved from star vehicles to franchises, and now to ?universes? - for exampl...

    This is largely, a Bell's End Shakes Fist at Cloud. This is basically preaching to the choir of anyone who has disliked and/or bored with all the franchising work that's been happening over the past decade or so. I'm a big fan of Peter Biskind, so this felt like a voice in the void...

    Loved this from cover to cover. A page turner, even though it is non-fiction. Maybe it is because I am such a movie business nerd. STAY AWAY FROM THIS IF YOU LOVE MOVIES. It is a bleak, depressing outlook on what has happened to the movie industry. The themes and overall messages in he...

    It's economics stupid! If you have half a brain you know what happened to movies. If not, and you need it explained to you, Than this book is for you. Or if you just don't have time to invest in pop culture to be able to use your brain, but then you probably don't have time to read thi...

  • Ursula Johnson
    Apr 26, 2019

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

  • Dancall
    Mar 18, 2019

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

    An incisive -- and chilling -- look at Hollywood today. I worked in the industry when studios would release a diverse slate of 25-30 pictures a year: mid-budget dramas, comedies, rom-coms, thrillers, etc. Now the author tells us that studios are focused on a few "big tentpoles" a year...

    Very interesting examination of the current state Hollywood, very much a good news/bad news thing. The good news is that Hollywood is making product that, apparently, people want to see. The bad news is that the big studios have become franchise machines, only interested in making supe...

    Excellent read for those interested in the current climate in Hollywood, one that favors massive cinematic universes and movies with explosions, while giving short shrift to anything that doesn't include killer robots. The author explores the current players in Hollywood, including the...

    A timely look at what is happening in the Hollywood and the movie industry. Why are there so many superhero films, and what does this mean for the industry and for us as fans? As Ben Fritz explains, we?ve moved from star vehicles to franchises, and now to ?universes? - for exampl...

  • Thomas Myers
    Oct 09, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

  • Emmanuel-francis
    Apr 16, 2019

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

    An incisive -- and chilling -- look at Hollywood today. I worked in the industry when studios would release a diverse slate of 25-30 pictures a year: mid-budget dramas, comedies, rom-coms, thrillers, etc. Now the author tells us that studios are focused on a few "big tentpoles" a year...

    Very interesting examination of the current state Hollywood, very much a good news/bad news thing. The good news is that Hollywood is making product that, apparently, people want to see. The bad news is that the big studios have become franchise machines, only interested in making supe...

    Excellent read for those interested in the current climate in Hollywood, one that favors massive cinematic universes and movies with explosions, while giving short shrift to anything that doesn't include killer robots. The author explores the current players in Hollywood, including the...

    A timely look at what is happening in the Hollywood and the movie industry. Why are there so many superhero films, and what does this mean for the industry and for us as fans? As Ben Fritz explains, we?ve moved from star vehicles to franchises, and now to ?universes? - for exampl...

    This is largely, a Bell's End Shakes Fist at Cloud. This is basically preaching to the choir of anyone who has disliked and/or bored with all the franchising work that's been happening over the past decade or so. I'm a big fan of Peter Biskind, so this felt like a voice in the void...

    Loved this from cover to cover. A page turner, even though it is non-fiction. Maybe it is because I am such a movie business nerd. STAY AWAY FROM THIS IF YOU LOVE MOVIES. It is a bleak, depressing outlook on what has happened to the movie industry. The themes and overall messages in he...

    It's economics stupid! If you have half a brain you know what happened to movies. If not, and you need it explained to you, Than this book is for you. Or if you just don't have time to invest in pop culture to be able to use your brain, but then you probably don't have time to read thi...

    Captures the evolution of the cinema business over the past couple of decades and does so without being bitter about perceived decline in the art of movie making (in favour for big budget franchises that are easily understandable across various cultures). In fact it is overall an optim...

    Nice update on how this part of the culture industry has been changing. Especially interesting is this shift within the public sphere from synchronous experience of movie events, enabling exchanges and dialogue about stories with a common, timely reference to the decline of the same, t...

    A fascinating look at the effects of the impact of globalisation and technological change on one of America?s prestige industries/institutions. Valuable not just for the way the story is told?breezily, but also in the wider lessons to be drawn: the growing impact of tech firms and ...

  • Joe Kucharski
    Apr 27, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

  • Jeffrey H
    Apr 06, 2019

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

    An incisive -- and chilling -- look at Hollywood today. I worked in the industry when studios would release a diverse slate of 25-30 pictures a year: mid-budget dramas, comedies, rom-coms, thrillers, etc. Now the author tells us that studios are focused on a few "big tentpoles" a year...

    Very interesting examination of the current state Hollywood, very much a good news/bad news thing. The good news is that Hollywood is making product that, apparently, people want to see. The bad news is that the big studios have become franchise machines, only interested in making supe...

    Excellent read for those interested in the current climate in Hollywood, one that favors massive cinematic universes and movies with explosions, while giving short shrift to anything that doesn't include killer robots. The author explores the current players in Hollywood, including the...

    A timely look at what is happening in the Hollywood and the movie industry. Why are there so many superhero films, and what does this mean for the industry and for us as fans? As Ben Fritz explains, we?ve moved from star vehicles to franchises, and now to ?universes? - for exampl...

    This is largely, a Bell's End Shakes Fist at Cloud. This is basically preaching to the choir of anyone who has disliked and/or bored with all the franchising work that's been happening over the past decade or so. I'm a big fan of Peter Biskind, so this felt like a voice in the void...

    Loved this from cover to cover. A page turner, even though it is non-fiction. Maybe it is because I am such a movie business nerd. STAY AWAY FROM THIS IF YOU LOVE MOVIES. It is a bleak, depressing outlook on what has happened to the movie industry. The themes and overall messages in he...

    It's economics stupid! If you have half a brain you know what happened to movies. If not, and you need it explained to you, Than this book is for you. Or if you just don't have time to invest in pop culture to be able to use your brain, but then you probably don't have time to read thi...

    Captures the evolution of the cinema business over the past couple of decades and does so without being bitter about perceived decline in the art of movie making (in favour for big budget franchises that are easily understandable across various cultures). In fact it is overall an optim...

    Nice update on how this part of the culture industry has been changing. Especially interesting is this shift within the public sphere from synchronous experience of movie events, enabling exchanges and dialogue about stories with a common, timely reference to the decline of the same, t...

  • Casey Ryan
    Aug 21, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

    I like the first half of the book better than the second. Not sure if it was me, or if the first half just flowed better. Felt more interesting, more complete stories. By the time I got to the last 1/4 of the book, I was skimming just to get done. Don't feel that Fritz said anything ne...

    An incisive -- and chilling -- look at Hollywood today. I worked in the industry when studios would release a diverse slate of 25-30 pictures a year: mid-budget dramas, comedies, rom-coms, thrillers, etc. Now the author tells us that studios are focused on a few "big tentpoles" a year...

    Very interesting examination of the current state Hollywood, very much a good news/bad news thing. The good news is that Hollywood is making product that, apparently, people want to see. The bad news is that the big studios have become franchise machines, only interested in making supe...

    Excellent read for those interested in the current climate in Hollywood, one that favors massive cinematic universes and movies with explosions, while giving short shrift to anything that doesn't include killer robots. The author explores the current players in Hollywood, including the...

    A timely look at what is happening in the Hollywood and the movie industry. Why are there so many superhero films, and what does this mean for the industry and for us as fans? As Ben Fritz explains, we?ve moved from star vehicles to franchises, and now to ?universes? - for exampl...

    This is largely, a Bell's End Shakes Fist at Cloud. This is basically preaching to the choir of anyone who has disliked and/or bored with all the franchising work that's been happening over the past decade or so. I'm a big fan of Peter Biskind, so this felt like a voice in the void...

    Loved this from cover to cover. A page turner, even though it is non-fiction. Maybe it is because I am such a movie business nerd. STAY AWAY FROM THIS IF YOU LOVE MOVIES. It is a bleak, depressing outlook on what has happened to the movie industry. The themes and overall messages in he...

  • Jingwei Shi
    Aug 13, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

  • Tnpruett
    Mar 22, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

  • JQ Salazar
    Nov 12, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

  • Zachary Houle
    Mar 03, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

  • Samuel James
    Jun 12, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

  • E. Nicholas
    Feb 11, 2019

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...

    Whoa. This book offers a clear and wide-ranging analysis of Modern Hollywood. If you want to know how the modern movie-making process works, and why big tentpole films reign supreme, Ben Fritz has the answer. He looks through the lenses of a major studio (Sony Pictures), and tracks the...

    This book provides a very good overview of the movie industry from its past to its present. The author clearly points out the disruption and root causes while diving in depth about each significant player in the industry (ie. Netflix, Amazon, Sony, Disney etc). ...

    Great inside look at both the factors upending the movie biz as well as the corp culture at Sony pictures ...

    Panoramic overview of the many ways the movie business is changing Cleverly uses the hacked Sony emails as a window into the struggles of an old school studio boss, Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal, to adjust to the new realities of a franchise dominated, digitally disrupted Hollywood...

    A must for any lover of film who's a bit bummed by the takeover of franchises. Fascinating analysis of every facet of the business. ...

    The New Reality is Already Here The title of this book is somewhat interesting, since the fight is pretty much over. A number of studios are facing the reality that consumers have choices for entertainment. Art-house films the Academy loves, the public does not. Viewership has falle...

    The author, using Sony-hacked emails for much of his source material (which presents in and of itself a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall account of a film studio in the mid 2010s struggling to create mid-budget ?adult? movies) convincingly argues: 1. Franchise films( especially those d...

    A fascinating and often times eye-opening account of how, in the past few decades, Hollywood has come to be dominated by tentpoles, franchise movies, and the birth of "cinematic universes." Aided in part by a treasure trove of insider information made public after the Sony leak, Ben Fr...

  • Helen Shen
    Sep 29, 2018

    Ben Fritz answers the question of people like me who bemoan the decline in films of interest: What happened? As a Wall Street Journal reporter he is well qualified to answer this question since the answer lies in the economics of the movie industry. While Fritz covers all the major...

    I don?t go to the movies anymore. That might surprise you if you know me, as I minored in Film Studies while pursuing a Journalism degree some 20 years ago. (Though that was more of a time management move on my part???it was easy to cut film class if they were showing a popular...

    Long story short, people are stupid. That's what the book says. People don't want new, creative things, they want the same old-same old; things they already know. Feh. ...

    Ben Fritz of the Wall Street Journal loves movies. He is passionate about the experience of communally watching a film, the unique ability for artists to tell their stories, and the Hollywood business machine behind it all. But man, he hates franchise features. From Marvel and DC to St...

    A fascinating look into the massive shifts in the movie industry from the rise of The Brand? and the death of the mid-budget star vehicle. Plus great insights into Amy Pascal's career and specifically, the last few years of her tenure at Sony. The stuff provided by the Sony hack is i...

    This is an interesting journalistic foray into the economics of Hollywood?s sequel/franchise/reboot obsession. Fritz does a good job assembling a coherent narrative from the decline of Sony Pictures, filled with data, boardroom drama and perspective on the industry as a cultural inst...

    My test for any book about Hollywood?particularly modern Hollywood?is whether or not the book teaches me anything new. As somebody whose main hobby is the box office and whose favorite intellectual pastimes include "thinking about movies" and "thinking about Hollywood as a global b...

    If you ever needed an insight into the film industry at large and what its insides are really doing, this is the book you need to read. Brilliantly written by someone with a great and intimate knowledge of the patterns and trends that the film industry is exhibiting, Fritz's book not o...

    I hate to say this, Ben Fritz about media are way too biast against the new media persective. Ironically he is also one of the journalist responsible for the fake news about Pewdiepie and take it out off context just to slander all the new media all together. I highly recommend to a...