Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home

Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home

Nora Krug's story of her attempt to confront the hidden truths of her family?s wartime past in Nazi Germany and to comprehend the forces that have shaped her life, her generation, and history. Nora Krug was born decades after the fall of the Nazi regime, but the Second World War cast a long shadow throughout her childhood and youth in the city of Karlsruhe, Germany. For Nor Nora Krug's story of her attempt to confront the hidden truths of her family?s wartime past in Nazi Germany and t...

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Title:Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home
Author:Nora Krug
Rating:
Genres:Sequential Art
ISBN:Heimat: Ein deutsches Familienalbum
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:288 pages pages

Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home Reviews

  • vanessa
    Dec 30, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

    Need to read the actual book,not suitable for an ereader.....graphics take too long to load. It really is a work of art. She investigates her german family history and nazi involvement . Many questions are never really answered. I was fascinated by her juxtaposition of pictures, drawin...

    As a present day German-American woman, Nora Krug struggles with her birth country?s past and the guilt associated with WWII, the Holocaust, and Nazis. In this personal memoir, Krug seeks to find out her family?s involvement with the Nazis and to reconcile her sense of belonging an...

    It's not popular to rate this only a 3, but I have to do it. The illustrations throughout were truly interesting and the best part of the book. I really liked that each page was it's own little surprise of images. The writing though... it dragged. It dragged for so long with little to ...

    2.5. Belonging feels like an innovative and unconventional graphic memoir: Krug's pictures and mixed-media are worth looking through in my opinion. The first third of this book had me hooked - I was invested in learning about the author's family. As she attempted to gather stories and ...

  • Elizabeth
    Jul 11, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

  • Steven Peck
    May 26, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

    Need to read the actual book,not suitable for an ereader.....graphics take too long to load. It really is a work of art. She investigates her german family history and nazi involvement . Many questions are never really answered. I was fascinated by her juxtaposition of pictures, drawin...

    As a present day German-American woman, Nora Krug struggles with her birth country?s past and the guilt associated with WWII, the Holocaust, and Nazis. In this personal memoir, Krug seeks to find out her family?s involvement with the Nazis and to reconcile her sense of belonging an...

    It's not popular to rate this only a 3, but I have to do it. The illustrations throughout were truly interesting and the best part of the book. I really liked that each page was it's own little surprise of images. The writing though... it dragged. It dragged for so long with little to ...

    2.5. Belonging feels like an innovative and unconventional graphic memoir: Krug's pictures and mixed-media are worth looking through in my opinion. The first third of this book had me hooked - I was invested in learning about the author's family. As she attempted to gather stories and ...

    In Heimat, Krug begins by relating growing up in Karlsruhe, Germany, where there is a systematic education of the past, and a collective post-war guilt?even the word "heimat" (homeland) brings intense shame. I found this very educational, I didn't know the extent of the Allies invest...

    Nora Krug is a German American who has spent most of her life in the United States, but is haunted by her lack of knowledge about her family's role in WWII. This graphic novel is an extremely unique way to tell the story of her hunt for the truth about her ancestors. I had never read a...

    I wasn't sure what I expected, but definitely less walls of text and more illustrations/photographs. Plus it was quite annoying that images broke up the texts sometimes, but other times they didn't. I am reminded once again why I never read books about family histories, because they ar...

    Wow. My favourite book of the year . . . at least, so far. I read a library copy, but will need to purchase my own. Original is in German. Maybe I'll get that. Nora Krug doesn't shy away from the difficult questions or the equally difficult answers. The added graphics give this book vi...

    A powerful book. About family, guilt, how past events affects a family, the present and everything in between. The scrapbook style, combined illustrations with photographs and so many mixed materials, makes this an extraordinary read. Thoughtprovoking and a must-read! ...

    Belonging by Nora Krug is a fantastic graphic memoir. It?s a personal story, one about her family, about Germany?s ugly Nazi history, and what it means to be German today. I highly recommend it and it?s so well done inside. Perfect blend of art and text. Just great. ...

    This review was originally posted on my review blog Deanna Reads Books This graphic memoir is a really deep and poignant look at one's self. It's a really heavy topic, but I found it awesome to experience Nora's journey of self-discovery cool to be done in the graphic medium. I also l...

    This book is timely and essential. Krug reflects on the deep guilt she confronted growing up German, knowing that her previous generations participated in one of the most horrific moments in history. In this graphic novel, she explores specifically questions about how her parents, gran...

  • Manny
    Dec 28, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

  • BHodges
    Jun 12, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

  • Krisette Spangler
    Jun 07, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

    Need to read the actual book,not suitable for an ereader.....graphics take too long to load. It really is a work of art. She investigates her german family history and nazi involvement . Many questions are never really answered. I was fascinated by her juxtaposition of pictures, drawin...

    As a present day German-American woman, Nora Krug struggles with her birth country?s past and the guilt associated with WWII, the Holocaust, and Nazis. In this personal memoir, Krug seeks to find out her family?s involvement with the Nazis and to reconcile her sense of belonging an...

    It's not popular to rate this only a 3, but I have to do it. The illustrations throughout were truly interesting and the best part of the book. I really liked that each page was it's own little surprise of images. The writing though... it dragged. It dragged for so long with little to ...

    2.5. Belonging feels like an innovative and unconventional graphic memoir: Krug's pictures and mixed-media are worth looking through in my opinion. The first third of this book had me hooked - I was invested in learning about the author's family. As she attempted to gather stories and ...

    In Heimat, Krug begins by relating growing up in Karlsruhe, Germany, where there is a systematic education of the past, and a collective post-war guilt?even the word "heimat" (homeland) brings intense shame. I found this very educational, I didn't know the extent of the Allies invest...

    Nora Krug is a German American who has spent most of her life in the United States, but is haunted by her lack of knowledge about her family's role in WWII. This graphic novel is an extremely unique way to tell the story of her hunt for the truth about her ancestors. I had never read a...

  • Tatiana
    Dec 28, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

  • Bean
    Dec 23, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

  • notgettingenough
    Dec 31, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

  • Gabriele Goldstone
    Jun 21, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

    Need to read the actual book,not suitable for an ereader.....graphics take too long to load. It really is a work of art. She investigates her german family history and nazi involvement . Many questions are never really answered. I was fascinated by her juxtaposition of pictures, drawin...

    As a present day German-American woman, Nora Krug struggles with her birth country?s past and the guilt associated with WWII, the Holocaust, and Nazis. In this personal memoir, Krug seeks to find out her family?s involvement with the Nazis and to reconcile her sense of belonging an...

    It's not popular to rate this only a 3, but I have to do it. The illustrations throughout were truly interesting and the best part of the book. I really liked that each page was it's own little surprise of images. The writing though... it dragged. It dragged for so long with little to ...

    2.5. Belonging feels like an innovative and unconventional graphic memoir: Krug's pictures and mixed-media are worth looking through in my opinion. The first third of this book had me hooked - I was invested in learning about the author's family. As she attempted to gather stories and ...

    In Heimat, Krug begins by relating growing up in Karlsruhe, Germany, where there is a systematic education of the past, and a collective post-war guilt?even the word "heimat" (homeland) brings intense shame. I found this very educational, I didn't know the extent of the Allies invest...

    Nora Krug is a German American who has spent most of her life in the United States, but is haunted by her lack of knowledge about her family's role in WWII. This graphic novel is an extremely unique way to tell the story of her hunt for the truth about her ancestors. I had never read a...

    I wasn't sure what I expected, but definitely less walls of text and more illustrations/photographs. Plus it was quite annoying that images broke up the texts sometimes, but other times they didn't. I am reminded once again why I never read books about family histories, because they ar...

    Wow. My favourite book of the year . . . at least, so far. I read a library copy, but will need to purchase my own. Original is in German. Maybe I'll get that. Nora Krug doesn't shy away from the difficult questions or the equally difficult answers. The added graphics give this book vi...

  • Laura
    Jul 16, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

  • Elizabeth A
    Mar 08, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

  • Heather
    Jul 30, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

    Need to read the actual book,not suitable for an ereader.....graphics take too long to load. It really is a work of art. She investigates her german family history and nazi involvement . Many questions are never really answered. I was fascinated by her juxtaposition of pictures, drawin...

    As a present day German-American woman, Nora Krug struggles with her birth country?s past and the guilt associated with WWII, the Holocaust, and Nazis. In this personal memoir, Krug seeks to find out her family?s involvement with the Nazis and to reconcile her sense of belonging an...

    It's not popular to rate this only a 3, but I have to do it. The illustrations throughout were truly interesting and the best part of the book. I really liked that each page was it's own little surprise of images. The writing though... it dragged. It dragged for so long with little to ...

  • Jessica Woodbury
    Apr 12, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

  • Emily May
    Jan 16, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

  • Melanie (Mel's Bookland Adventures)
    Oct 17, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

  • Hannah
    Nov 09, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

    Need to read the actual book,not suitable for an ereader.....graphics take too long to load. It really is a work of art. She investigates her german family history and nazi involvement . Many questions are never really answered. I was fascinated by her juxtaposition of pictures, drawin...

    As a present day German-American woman, Nora Krug struggles with her birth country?s past and the guilt associated with WWII, the Holocaust, and Nazis. In this personal memoir, Krug seeks to find out her family?s involvement with the Nazis and to reconcile her sense of belonging an...

  • Deanna (Deanna Reads Books)
    Aug 20, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

    Need to read the actual book,not suitable for an ereader.....graphics take too long to load. It really is a work of art. She investigates her german family history and nazi involvement . Many questions are never really answered. I was fascinated by her juxtaposition of pictures, drawin...

    As a present day German-American woman, Nora Krug struggles with her birth country?s past and the guilt associated with WWII, the Holocaust, and Nazis. In this personal memoir, Krug seeks to find out her family?s involvement with the Nazis and to reconcile her sense of belonging an...

    It's not popular to rate this only a 3, but I have to do it. The illustrations throughout were truly interesting and the best part of the book. I really liked that each page was it's own little surprise of images. The writing though... it dragged. It dragged for so long with little to ...

    2.5. Belonging feels like an innovative and unconventional graphic memoir: Krug's pictures and mixed-media are worth looking through in my opinion. The first third of this book had me hooked - I was invested in learning about the author's family. As she attempted to gather stories and ...

    In Heimat, Krug begins by relating growing up in Karlsruhe, Germany, where there is a systematic education of the past, and a collective post-war guilt?even the word "heimat" (homeland) brings intense shame. I found this very educational, I didn't know the extent of the Allies invest...

    Nora Krug is a German American who has spent most of her life in the United States, but is haunted by her lack of knowledge about her family's role in WWII. This graphic novel is an extremely unique way to tell the story of her hunt for the truth about her ancestors. I had never read a...

    I wasn't sure what I expected, but definitely less walls of text and more illustrations/photographs. Plus it was quite annoying that images broke up the texts sometimes, but other times they didn't. I am reminded once again why I never read books about family histories, because they ar...

    Wow. My favourite book of the year . . . at least, so far. I read a library copy, but will need to purchase my own. Original is in German. Maybe I'll get that. Nora Krug doesn't shy away from the difficult questions or the equally difficult answers. The added graphics give this book vi...

    A powerful book. About family, guilt, how past events affects a family, the present and everything in between. The scrapbook style, combined illustrations with photographs and so many mixed materials, makes this an extraordinary read. Thoughtprovoking and a must-read! ...

    Belonging by Nora Krug is a fantastic graphic memoir. It?s a personal story, one about her family, about Germany?s ugly Nazi history, and what it means to be German today. I highly recommend it and it?s so well done inside. Perfect blend of art and text. Just great. ...

    This review was originally posted on my review blog Deanna Reads Books This graphic memoir is a really deep and poignant look at one's self. It's a really heavy topic, but I found it awesome to experience Nora's journey of self-discovery cool to be done in the graphic medium. I also l...

  • Mehsi
    May 29, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

    Need to read the actual book,not suitable for an ereader.....graphics take too long to load. It really is a work of art. She investigates her german family history and nazi involvement . Many questions are never really answered. I was fascinated by her juxtaposition of pictures, drawin...

    As a present day German-American woman, Nora Krug struggles with her birth country?s past and the guilt associated with WWII, the Holocaust, and Nazis. In this personal memoir, Krug seeks to find out her family?s involvement with the Nazis and to reconcile her sense of belonging an...

    It's not popular to rate this only a 3, but I have to do it. The illustrations throughout were truly interesting and the best part of the book. I really liked that each page was it's own little surprise of images. The writing though... it dragged. It dragged for so long with little to ...

    2.5. Belonging feels like an innovative and unconventional graphic memoir: Krug's pictures and mixed-media are worth looking through in my opinion. The first third of this book had me hooked - I was invested in learning about the author's family. As she attempted to gather stories and ...

    In Heimat, Krug begins by relating growing up in Karlsruhe, Germany, where there is a systematic education of the past, and a collective post-war guilt?even the word "heimat" (homeland) brings intense shame. I found this very educational, I didn't know the extent of the Allies invest...

    Nora Krug is a German American who has spent most of her life in the United States, but is haunted by her lack of knowledge about her family's role in WWII. This graphic novel is an extremely unique way to tell the story of her hunt for the truth about her ancestors. I had never read a...

    I wasn't sure what I expected, but definitely less walls of text and more illustrations/photographs. Plus it was quite annoying that images broke up the texts sometimes, but other times they didn't. I am reminded once again why I never read books about family histories, because they ar...

  • Paltia
    Mar 02, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

  • Charles Finch
    Feb 23, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

  • Geoffrey
    Jun 22, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

  • Jessica Rosner
    Mar 06, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

  • Rod Brown
    Feb 10, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

  • Shelly
    Dec 21, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

    Need to read the actual book,not suitable for an ereader.....graphics take too long to load. It really is a work of art. She investigates her german family history and nazi involvement . Many questions are never really answered. I was fascinated by her juxtaposition of pictures, drawin...

    As a present day German-American woman, Nora Krug struggles with her birth country?s past and the guilt associated with WWII, the Holocaust, and Nazis. In this personal memoir, Krug seeks to find out her family?s involvement with the Nazis and to reconcile her sense of belonging an...

    It's not popular to rate this only a 3, but I have to do it. The illustrations throughout were truly interesting and the best part of the book. I really liked that each page was it's own little surprise of images. The writing though... it dragged. It dragged for so long with little to ...

    2.5. Belonging feels like an innovative and unconventional graphic memoir: Krug's pictures and mixed-media are worth looking through in my opinion. The first third of this book had me hooked - I was invested in learning about the author's family. As she attempted to gather stories and ...

    In Heimat, Krug begins by relating growing up in Karlsruhe, Germany, where there is a systematic education of the past, and a collective post-war guilt?even the word "heimat" (homeland) brings intense shame. I found this very educational, I didn't know the extent of the Allies invest...

    Nora Krug is a German American who has spent most of her life in the United States, but is haunted by her lack of knowledge about her family's role in WWII. This graphic novel is an extremely unique way to tell the story of her hunt for the truth about her ancestors. I had never read a...

    I wasn't sure what I expected, but definitely less walls of text and more illustrations/photographs. Plus it was quite annoying that images broke up the texts sometimes, but other times they didn't. I am reminded once again why I never read books about family histories, because they ar...

    Wow. My favourite book of the year . . . at least, so far. I read a library copy, but will need to purchase my own. Original is in German. Maybe I'll get that. Nora Krug doesn't shy away from the difficult questions or the equally difficult answers. The added graphics give this book vi...

    A powerful book. About family, guilt, how past events affects a family, the present and everything in between. The scrapbook style, combined illustrations with photographs and so many mixed materials, makes this an extraordinary read. Thoughtprovoking and a must-read! ...

    Belonging by Nora Krug is a fantastic graphic memoir. It?s a personal story, one about her family, about Germany?s ugly Nazi history, and what it means to be German today. I highly recommend it and it?s so well done inside. Perfect blend of art and text. Just great. ...

  • leynes
    Jun 14, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

  • Nina
    Mar 24, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

    Need to read the actual book,not suitable for an ereader.....graphics take too long to load. It really is a work of art. She investigates her german family history and nazi involvement . Many questions are never really answered. I was fascinated by her juxtaposition of pictures, drawin...

    As a present day German-American woman, Nora Krug struggles with her birth country?s past and the guilt associated with WWII, the Holocaust, and Nazis. In this personal memoir, Krug seeks to find out her family?s involvement with the Nazis and to reconcile her sense of belonging an...

    It's not popular to rate this only a 3, but I have to do it. The illustrations throughout were truly interesting and the best part of the book. I really liked that each page was it's own little surprise of images. The writing though... it dragged. It dragged for so long with little to ...

    2.5. Belonging feels like an innovative and unconventional graphic memoir: Krug's pictures and mixed-media are worth looking through in my opinion. The first third of this book had me hooked - I was invested in learning about the author's family. As she attempted to gather stories and ...

    In Heimat, Krug begins by relating growing up in Karlsruhe, Germany, where there is a systematic education of the past, and a collective post-war guilt?even the word "heimat" (homeland) brings intense shame. I found this very educational, I didn't know the extent of the Allies invest...

  • Anne Elisabeth
    Jul 02, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

    Need to read the actual book,not suitable for an ereader.....graphics take too long to load. It really is a work of art. She investigates her german family history and nazi involvement . Many questions are never really answered. I was fascinated by her juxtaposition of pictures, drawin...

    As a present day German-American woman, Nora Krug struggles with her birth country?s past and the guilt associated with WWII, the Holocaust, and Nazis. In this personal memoir, Krug seeks to find out her family?s involvement with the Nazis and to reconcile her sense of belonging an...

    It's not popular to rate this only a 3, but I have to do it. The illustrations throughout were truly interesting and the best part of the book. I really liked that each page was it's own little surprise of images. The writing though... it dragged. It dragged for so long with little to ...

    2.5. Belonging feels like an innovative and unconventional graphic memoir: Krug's pictures and mixed-media are worth looking through in my opinion. The first third of this book had me hooked - I was invested in learning about the author's family. As she attempted to gather stories and ...

    In Heimat, Krug begins by relating growing up in Karlsruhe, Germany, where there is a systematic education of the past, and a collective post-war guilt?even the word "heimat" (homeland) brings intense shame. I found this very educational, I didn't know the extent of the Allies invest...

    Nora Krug is a German American who has spent most of her life in the United States, but is haunted by her lack of knowledge about her family's role in WWII. This graphic novel is an extremely unique way to tell the story of her hunt for the truth about her ancestors. I had never read a...

    I wasn't sure what I expected, but definitely less walls of text and more illustrations/photographs. Plus it was quite annoying that images broke up the texts sometimes, but other times they didn't. I am reminded once again why I never read books about family histories, because they ar...

    Wow. My favourite book of the year . . . at least, so far. I read a library copy, but will need to purchase my own. Original is in German. Maybe I'll get that. Nora Krug doesn't shy away from the difficult questions or the equally difficult answers. The added graphics give this book vi...

    A powerful book. About family, guilt, how past events affects a family, the present and everything in between. The scrapbook style, combined illustrations with photographs and so many mixed materials, makes this an extraordinary read. Thoughtprovoking and a must-read! ...

  • Carrie Templeton
    Aug 22, 2018

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

  • Anita Lynch-Cooper
    Feb 24, 2019

    I slowly began to accept that my knowledge will have limits, that I?ll never know exactly what Willi thought, what he saw or heard, what he decided to do or not to do, what he could have done and failed to do, and why. This is not an easy book to read. It's a graphic memoir of wha...

    This is an unusual book, which somehow manages to be both lyrical and extremely matter-of-fact. Nora is German, and although she has lived most of her life in the US and was anyway born long after the events in question, she feels horrible guilt about what her country has done. Over si...

    Can I give it an extra star? ...

    This would be a great companion read to Svetlana Alexievich's The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II. Both authors try to unearth and record the unspoken, suppressed truths of the WWII. The difference is that Russians were mandated to forget the ugly pa...

    Just uploaded a video talking about my favorite comics of all time. You bet Heimat showed up in there. /// Wow. What a feat. I still can't wrap my head around the fact that one single woman accomplished this. Nora Krug says that it took her six years to finalise this project, two ye...

    Started yesterday, finished this morning: this is the first adult picture book I've wanted to read, and as anticipated, I couldn't put it down. I suppose you could shelve this in some rather specific way. The 'my grandparents were Nazis' memoir shelf. Or the 'ordinary people in the ...

    I am almost overwhelmed at the depth and intensity of this graphic memoir. My husband is a second generation German American, his father was born in Germany shortly before the end of WWII and his mother is of Jewish heritage. As a child, my husband wasn?t taught German and learned ve...

    In "The Germans" episode of Fawlty Towers, Basil is told not to mention the war, but he does, frequently, until the guest break out in tears. At the time, I thought it odd that the germans would be upset about it. As Basil said, they started it. I bring this up, because the author o...

    This graphic memoir is a mix of text, illustrations, photographs, and art. It's not an easy read, but is well worth the time it takes to do so. How many of us really think about the history of our cultures, or country, or of how much we benefited or lost due to events that occured ...

    Must write a detailed review later but I have many, many thoughts. - It seems the author's central motivator is ascertaining what amount of guilt and shame she feels (personally, ancestrally, culturally) is actually 'reasonable', based on what her relatives 'did' or 'did not' do. Al...

    Belonging is an absolutely beautiful memoir full of questions about identity, family and homeland. Nora Krug was born and raised in Germany, in the shadow of World War II. Belonging is a deeply personal memoir about her struggles with German identity, coming to terms with her family hi...

    A German American immigrant feels guilty about her home country's perpetration of the Holocaust and starts to investigate family stories to find the truth of how involved her ancestors were in the Nazi party and the German military during World War II. First, I hate when I open a gr...

    An interesting and excellent use of graphic form in the growing graphic nonfiction genre. Krug goes back through her family's history to learn what they did and who they were during WWII. She is ready to both condemn and embrace, she goes in as a fully empathetic person and her clear-e...

    Found this book fascinating and its use of the medium really interesting (admittedly as someone who doesn't read many graphic novels, to be fair). ...

    A book for our time. In this scrapbook of beautiful illustrations Nora Krug shares her personal search for "heimat," a German term describing a place that offers the immediate sense of familiarity. It often refers to the actual landscape where one was born. It shapes a person's identit...

    While traveling near Paris and speaking barely passable French I, by chance, met a young German man, also moving across the world. Back then, we were both about 19 years old. We did what people did in those times,we paused for coffee and conversation. Before too long he began to speak ...

    (Note: I received an advanced reader's copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Between the real life photos and documents that are mixed with absolutely gorgeous art, and Nora Krug's meticulous documentation of her quest to unravel and understand her family's history, it's impossib...

    This is a graphic book (not a novel, a memoir) that has the goods. It is a beautiful object. The artwork is a mix of painting, collage, and photograph montages on colorful pages with thoughtful designs. The story is compelling. The search by the author to learn whether or not her gra...

    Need to read the actual book,not suitable for an ereader.....graphics take too long to load. It really is a work of art. She investigates her german family history and nazi involvement . Many questions are never really answered. I was fascinated by her juxtaposition of pictures, drawin...