Here to Stay

Here to Stay

For most of high school, Bijan Majidi has flown under the radar. He gets good grades, reads comics, hangs out with his best friend, Sean, and secretly crushes on Elle, one of the most popular girls in his school. When he?s called off the basketball team?s varsity bench and makes the winning basket in a playoff game, everything changes in an instant. But not everyone is happ For most of high school, Bijan Majidi has flown under the radar. He gets good grades, reads comics, hangs out wit...

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Title:Here to Stay
Author:Sara Farizan
Rating:
Genres:Young Adult
ISBN:1616207000
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:304 pages pages

Here to Stay Reviews

  • Renata
    Sep 24, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

    What a sweet story. My community has done a lot of horrible, Islamophobic things to our Middle Eastern and Asian populations in the past couple years, so this book hit me really hard. I loved Bijan, and I absolutely loved his mother. A necessary book. ...

    A heart warming, heart wrenching and funny young adult novel. Bijan is a prep school student in 11th grade who has flown under the radar of the cool kids until he is pulled up from jv basketball to varsity and scores the winning basket. Suddenly Bijan is thrown into the spotlight and n...

    I liked Bijan so much, but I loved the commentators in his head and his wingman, Sean, the best. There?s a lot of hilarious sass in here, which helps balance the serious parts. It kind of reminded me of An Absolutely True Diary, but with tamer language. ...

    Even after reading other reviews that alluded to this, I was still surprised at how entertaining this book was. This is a book full of diversity that tackles important topics, and the best part is you will really enjoy reading it. ...

    Read my full review on Forever Young Adult. ...

    My 14 and 12 year old read this book extremely quickly and both said they really liked it. After finally picking it up myself I can see why. Even though I'm not as big a basketball fan as my boys , I found myself reading this quickly , not wanting to put it down, and wondering what was...

    Thank you Sara Farizan for this beautiful and important book! Bijan goes from unnoticed to center spotlight when he subs for a star player on his private school?s basketball team. Unfortunately the attention he receives isn?t all positive and he is soon struggling to figure out who...

    This is a really refreshing, nuanced story! I loove Bijan as a character/narrator, he's such a funny and self-aware kid. I liked seeing him excel at basketball and yet navigate the difficult terrain of "popularity" combined with an array of race/religion/class-based micro- (and macro-)...

  • Laura Gardner
    Mar 30, 2019

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

    What a sweet story. My community has done a lot of horrible, Islamophobic things to our Middle Eastern and Asian populations in the past couple years, so this book hit me really hard. I loved Bijan, and I absolutely loved his mother. A necessary book. ...

    A heart warming, heart wrenching and funny young adult novel. Bijan is a prep school student in 11th grade who has flown under the radar of the cool kids until he is pulled up from jv basketball to varsity and scores the winning basket. Suddenly Bijan is thrown into the spotlight and n...

    I liked Bijan so much, but I loved the commentators in his head and his wingman, Sean, the best. There?s a lot of hilarious sass in here, which helps balance the serious parts. It kind of reminded me of An Absolutely True Diary, but with tamer language. ...

    Even after reading other reviews that alluded to this, I was still surprised at how entertaining this book was. This is a book full of diversity that tackles important topics, and the best part is you will really enjoy reading it. ...

    Read my full review on Forever Young Adult. ...

    My 14 and 12 year old read this book extremely quickly and both said they really liked it. After finally picking it up myself I can see why. Even though I'm not as big a basketball fan as my boys , I found myself reading this quickly , not wanting to put it down, and wondering what was...

    Thank you Sara Farizan for this beautiful and important book! Bijan goes from unnoticed to center spotlight when he subs for a star player on his private school?s basketball team. Unfortunately the attention he receives isn?t all positive and he is soon struggling to figure out who...

    This is a really refreshing, nuanced story! I loove Bijan as a character/narrator, he's such a funny and self-aware kid. I liked seeing him excel at basketball and yet navigate the difficult terrain of "popularity" combined with an array of race/religion/class-based micro- (and macro-)...

    This book was so predictable. I was able to tell who did what and who liked whom immediately. I feel like there were so many relationships going on in this book to the point where I couldn't keep up with all of them. I like the message the book is conveying (humans are humans and don't...

    Really enjoyed Bijan and his friends. And even though I don't usually like sports books, that's obviously not the main theme in this one. I liked the announcers in Bijan's head even if it didn't really add much to the story. I'm not in review mode right now, but I did like this one! Th...

    4.75 Another excellent novel by Farizan. She's become one of the authors I look forward to reading. I hope she has many more books in her! ...

    It?s a 2 book day! Loved this one, too. Also HS. Also intense. Highly recommend! ...

  • Claudia Silk
    Jun 18, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

    What a sweet story. My community has done a lot of horrible, Islamophobic things to our Middle Eastern and Asian populations in the past couple years, so this book hit me really hard. I loved Bijan, and I absolutely loved his mother. A necessary book. ...

    A heart warming, heart wrenching and funny young adult novel. Bijan is a prep school student in 11th grade who has flown under the radar of the cool kids until he is pulled up from jv basketball to varsity and scores the winning basket. Suddenly Bijan is thrown into the spotlight and n...

  • Kelly
    Jun 08, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

  • Nina
    Oct 09, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

    What a sweet story. My community has done a lot of horrible, Islamophobic things to our Middle Eastern and Asian populations in the past couple years, so this book hit me really hard. I loved Bijan, and I absolutely loved his mother. A necessary book. ...

    A heart warming, heart wrenching and funny young adult novel. Bijan is a prep school student in 11th grade who has flown under the radar of the cool kids until he is pulled up from jv basketball to varsity and scores the winning basket. Suddenly Bijan is thrown into the spotlight and n...

    I liked Bijan so much, but I loved the commentators in his head and his wingman, Sean, the best. There?s a lot of hilarious sass in here, which helps balance the serious parts. It kind of reminded me of An Absolutely True Diary, but with tamer language. ...

    Even after reading other reviews that alluded to this, I was still surprised at how entertaining this book was. This is a book full of diversity that tackles important topics, and the best part is you will really enjoy reading it. ...

    Read my full review on Forever Young Adult. ...

    My 14 and 12 year old read this book extremely quickly and both said they really liked it. After finally picking it up myself I can see why. Even though I'm not as big a basketball fan as my boys , I found myself reading this quickly , not wanting to put it down, and wondering what was...

    Thank you Sara Farizan for this beautiful and important book! Bijan goes from unnoticed to center spotlight when he subs for a star player on his private school?s basketball team. Unfortunately the attention he receives isn?t all positive and he is soon struggling to figure out who...

    This is a really refreshing, nuanced story! I loove Bijan as a character/narrator, he's such a funny and self-aware kid. I liked seeing him excel at basketball and yet navigate the difficult terrain of "popularity" combined with an array of race/religion/class-based micro- (and macro-)...

    This book was so predictable. I was able to tell who did what and who liked whom immediately. I feel like there were so many relationships going on in this book to the point where I couldn't keep up with all of them. I like the message the book is conveying (humans are humans and don't...

    Really enjoyed Bijan and his friends. And even though I don't usually like sports books, that's obviously not the main theme in this one. I liked the announcers in Bijan's head even if it didn't really add much to the story. I'm not in review mode right now, but I did like this one! Th...

  • Reba
    Jan 29, 2019

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

  • Catie
    Jul 01, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

  • Becca
    Jan 25, 2019

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

  • McKinlay Dennis
    Sep 14, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

  • Jennifer Mangler
    Dec 26, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

    What a sweet story. My community has done a lot of horrible, Islamophobic things to our Middle Eastern and Asian populations in the past couple years, so this book hit me really hard. I loved Bijan, and I absolutely loved his mother. A necessary book. ...

    A heart warming, heart wrenching and funny young adult novel. Bijan is a prep school student in 11th grade who has flown under the radar of the cool kids until he is pulled up from jv basketball to varsity and scores the winning basket. Suddenly Bijan is thrown into the spotlight and n...

    I liked Bijan so much, but I loved the commentators in his head and his wingman, Sean, the best. There?s a lot of hilarious sass in here, which helps balance the serious parts. It kind of reminded me of An Absolutely True Diary, but with tamer language. ...

    Even after reading other reviews that alluded to this, I was still surprised at how entertaining this book was. This is a book full of diversity that tackles important topics, and the best part is you will really enjoy reading it. ...

  • Llyr Heller-Humphreys
    Apr 08, 2019

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

    What a sweet story. My community has done a lot of horrible, Islamophobic things to our Middle Eastern and Asian populations in the past couple years, so this book hit me really hard. I loved Bijan, and I absolutely loved his mother. A necessary book. ...

    A heart warming, heart wrenching and funny young adult novel. Bijan is a prep school student in 11th grade who has flown under the radar of the cool kids until he is pulled up from jv basketball to varsity and scores the winning basket. Suddenly Bijan is thrown into the spotlight and n...

    I liked Bijan so much, but I loved the commentators in his head and his wingman, Sean, the best. There?s a lot of hilarious sass in here, which helps balance the serious parts. It kind of reminded me of An Absolutely True Diary, but with tamer language. ...

    Even after reading other reviews that alluded to this, I was still surprised at how entertaining this book was. This is a book full of diversity that tackles important topics, and the best part is you will really enjoy reading it. ...

    Read my full review on Forever Young Adult. ...

    My 14 and 12 year old read this book extremely quickly and both said they really liked it. After finally picking it up myself I can see why. Even though I'm not as big a basketball fan as my boys , I found myself reading this quickly , not wanting to put it down, and wondering what was...

    Thank you Sara Farizan for this beautiful and important book! Bijan goes from unnoticed to center spotlight when he subs for a star player on his private school?s basketball team. Unfortunately the attention he receives isn?t all positive and he is soon struggling to figure out who...

    This is a really refreshing, nuanced story! I loove Bijan as a character/narrator, he's such a funny and self-aware kid. I liked seeing him excel at basketball and yet navigate the difficult terrain of "popularity" combined with an array of race/religion/class-based micro- (and macro-)...

    This book was so predictable. I was able to tell who did what and who liked whom immediately. I feel like there were so many relationships going on in this book to the point where I couldn't keep up with all of them. I like the message the book is conveying (humans are humans and don't...

    Really enjoyed Bijan and his friends. And even though I don't usually like sports books, that's obviously not the main theme in this one. I liked the announcers in Bijan's head even if it didn't really add much to the story. I'm not in review mode right now, but I did like this one! Th...

    4.75 Another excellent novel by Farizan. She's become one of the authors I look forward to reading. I hope she has many more books in her! ...

  • Mandy
    Sep 17, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

    What a sweet story. My community has done a lot of horrible, Islamophobic things to our Middle Eastern and Asian populations in the past couple years, so this book hit me really hard. I loved Bijan, and I absolutely loved his mother. A necessary book. ...

    A heart warming, heart wrenching and funny young adult novel. Bijan is a prep school student in 11th grade who has flown under the radar of the cool kids until he is pulled up from jv basketball to varsity and scores the winning basket. Suddenly Bijan is thrown into the spotlight and n...

    I liked Bijan so much, but I loved the commentators in his head and his wingman, Sean, the best. There?s a lot of hilarious sass in here, which helps balance the serious parts. It kind of reminded me of An Absolutely True Diary, but with tamer language. ...

    Even after reading other reviews that alluded to this, I was still surprised at how entertaining this book was. This is a book full of diversity that tackles important topics, and the best part is you will really enjoy reading it. ...

    Read my full review on Forever Young Adult. ...

  • USOM
    Aug 22, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

  • Kate Welsh
    Mar 15, 2019

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

  • Lola
    Mar 31, 2019

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

  • Natalie
    Nov 11, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

  • Kristel
    Sep 11, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

  • Karen Reed
    Aug 01, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

    What a sweet story. My community has done a lot of horrible, Islamophobic things to our Middle Eastern and Asian populations in the past couple years, so this book hit me really hard. I loved Bijan, and I absolutely loved his mother. A necessary book. ...

    A heart warming, heart wrenching and funny young adult novel. Bijan is a prep school student in 11th grade who has flown under the radar of the cool kids until he is pulled up from jv basketball to varsity and scores the winning basket. Suddenly Bijan is thrown into the spotlight and n...

    I liked Bijan so much, but I loved the commentators in his head and his wingman, Sean, the best. There?s a lot of hilarious sass in here, which helps balance the serious parts. It kind of reminded me of An Absolutely True Diary, but with tamer language. ...

    Even after reading other reviews that alluded to this, I was still surprised at how entertaining this book was. This is a book full of diversity that tackles important topics, and the best part is you will really enjoy reading it. ...

    Read my full review on Forever Young Adult. ...

    My 14 and 12 year old read this book extremely quickly and both said they really liked it. After finally picking it up myself I can see why. Even though I'm not as big a basketball fan as my boys , I found myself reading this quickly , not wanting to put it down, and wondering what was...

  • Kim Clifton
    Jan 04, 2019

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

    What a sweet story. My community has done a lot of horrible, Islamophobic things to our Middle Eastern and Asian populations in the past couple years, so this book hit me really hard. I loved Bijan, and I absolutely loved his mother. A necessary book. ...

    A heart warming, heart wrenching and funny young adult novel. Bijan is a prep school student in 11th grade who has flown under the radar of the cool kids until he is pulled up from jv basketball to varsity and scores the winning basket. Suddenly Bijan is thrown into the spotlight and n...

    I liked Bijan so much, but I loved the commentators in his head and his wingman, Sean, the best. There?s a lot of hilarious sass in here, which helps balance the serious parts. It kind of reminded me of An Absolutely True Diary, but with tamer language. ...

  • A.R. Hellbender
    Jun 07, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

  • Mary Thomas
    Jan 02, 2019

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

    What a sweet story. My community has done a lot of horrible, Islamophobic things to our Middle Eastern and Asian populations in the past couple years, so this book hit me really hard. I loved Bijan, and I absolutely loved his mother. A necessary book. ...

    A heart warming, heart wrenching and funny young adult novel. Bijan is a prep school student in 11th grade who has flown under the radar of the cool kids until he is pulled up from jv basketball to varsity and scores the winning basket. Suddenly Bijan is thrown into the spotlight and n...

    I liked Bijan so much, but I loved the commentators in his head and his wingman, Sean, the best. There?s a lot of hilarious sass in here, which helps balance the serious parts. It kind of reminded me of An Absolutely True Diary, but with tamer language. ...

    Even after reading other reviews that alluded to this, I was still surprised at how entertaining this book was. This is a book full of diversity that tackles important topics, and the best part is you will really enjoy reading it. ...

    Read my full review on Forever Young Adult. ...

    My 14 and 12 year old read this book extremely quickly and both said they really liked it. After finally picking it up myself I can see why. Even though I'm not as big a basketball fan as my boys , I found myself reading this quickly , not wanting to put it down, and wondering what was...

    Thank you Sara Farizan for this beautiful and important book! Bijan goes from unnoticed to center spotlight when he subs for a star player on his private school?s basketball team. Unfortunately the attention he receives isn?t all positive and he is soon struggling to figure out who...

  • Ian
    Oct 20, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

  • Michelle Arredondo
    Sep 23, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

  • Marjo
    Oct 22, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

  • Abigail George
    Jan 12, 2019

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

    What a sweet story. My community has done a lot of horrible, Islamophobic things to our Middle Eastern and Asian populations in the past couple years, so this book hit me really hard. I loved Bijan, and I absolutely loved his mother. A necessary book. ...

    A heart warming, heart wrenching and funny young adult novel. Bijan is a prep school student in 11th grade who has flown under the radar of the cool kids until he is pulled up from jv basketball to varsity and scores the winning basket. Suddenly Bijan is thrown into the spotlight and n...

    I liked Bijan so much, but I loved the commentators in his head and his wingman, Sean, the best. There?s a lot of hilarious sass in here, which helps balance the serious parts. It kind of reminded me of An Absolutely True Diary, but with tamer language. ...

    Even after reading other reviews that alluded to this, I was still surprised at how entertaining this book was. This is a book full of diversity that tackles important topics, and the best part is you will really enjoy reading it. ...

    Read my full review on Forever Young Adult. ...

    My 14 and 12 year old read this book extremely quickly and both said they really liked it. After finally picking it up myself I can see why. Even though I'm not as big a basketball fan as my boys , I found myself reading this quickly , not wanting to put it down, and wondering what was...

    Thank you Sara Farizan for this beautiful and important book! Bijan goes from unnoticed to center spotlight when he subs for a star player on his private school?s basketball team. Unfortunately the attention he receives isn?t all positive and he is soon struggling to figure out who...

    This is a really refreshing, nuanced story! I loove Bijan as a character/narrator, he's such a funny and self-aware kid. I liked seeing him excel at basketball and yet navigate the difficult terrain of "popularity" combined with an array of race/religion/class-based micro- (and macro-)...

    This book was so predictable. I was able to tell who did what and who liked whom immediately. I feel like there were so many relationships going on in this book to the point where I couldn't keep up with all of them. I like the message the book is conveying (humans are humans and don't...

  • Ryan Robidoux
    Feb 23, 2019

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

  • Lane Joslin
    Dec 21, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

  • Ivy
    Sep 08, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

  • Joey Rambles
    Sep 18, 2018

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

  • Wes
    Jan 30, 2019

    99 percent of people who read this book enjoyed it. Isn?t that crazy and awesome? I shouldn?t be surprised, because this was a wonderfully-written and deeply-moving story, but the only other book I?m aware of that has the same percentage of enjoyment is Michelle Obama?s memoir....

    How could a book about racism, homophobia, and ?The Age of Assholes? make me laugh SO MUCH? I still can?t fully articulate why, but this book was such a bright spot in my life last week. Amidst ever more depressing news stories, this book felt like spending time with a good frien...

    You're going to read a lot of reviews soon about how incredibly relevant and timely this book is, which it is. But that's not the only thing that makes this book successful. I mean, it's certainly an important factor. We need more diverse books. The books we read, especially as ...

    Bijan is, to put it loosely, kind of a dork. And he's really confident in being that. He loves basketball and is a JV on his private school's team. But when he's subbed in during a big game and makes the game-clinching shot, he finds himself suddenly elbow to elbow with a crew of cool ...

    Short, sweet, and very needed. Full Review: https://bookpeopleteens.wordpress.com... ...

    i finished it and i have concluded that i want to marry bijan. hes such a kind, soft boy and he deserves better than all the racist crap he deals with in this book. but in all seriousness, i really liked this a lot. i enjoyed the characters and their relationships felt so real. i ad...

    I was going to live my life. I was going to spend time with people who cared about me and whom I cared about. I was going to be comfortable in my own skin even when some people wanted to make that impossible for me. Important, frustrating, emotional, and funny! I didn't get much of ...

    Seems I'm in the minority on this one. First of all: we need more YA books featuring diverse protagonists. For a really strong read, see I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez or Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco Stork or The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristi...

    This is such a good story with the hard hitting relevance of The Hate U Give and Dear Martin (no one gets shot, but it still revolves around getting justice for a hate crime, and there are so many great quotes about what life can be like for people of color). There is so much divers...

    *i received an ARC of this book from edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book basically solidified Farizan as an autobuy author for me. Bijan is a sweet, brave, loving, loyal protagonist. The romances were adorable. I was invested in so many of th...

    Leaving off a rating because this wasn't exactly my thing but it's really thoughtful and smart and if I was a school/teen librarian, I would be shoving this into teenagers' hands as fast as I could. ...

    Is it differences or insecurity that make people hate? In Here to Stay, experienced novel writer Sara Farizan writes a book that connects to the prominent issues and addresses common stereotypes. Bijan Majidi is Iranian and attends Granger School. He gets involved in a quarrel with a v...

    An unfortunately timely read right now. This deals with heavy topics in a way that feels real but not depressing, with humor and heart, and the characters are lovable and flawed. ...

    Wow. This book was such an enjoyable and smart read, I read it in less than 24 hours. It handles issues like bullying, xenophobia, Islamophobia, and white privilege gracefully and authentically. Bijan is a lovable main character; he isn't perfect, but he's real, has real hopes and desi...

    A book hasn?t made me laugh like this in a long time. Maybe it?s because I just finished a book about death. But Here to Stay was so good. Here?s some of my favorite choices Farizan made: She showed a disconnect between individual interactions and ingrained prejudice. When Bij...

    Such serious topics...and yet I was laughing throughout the pages. Here to Stay...aaaah, it pulls at your heart strings. You will fall in love with Bijan. You will fall in love and in frustration and back in love with the entire story. So much emotion. You can't be invisible to adv...

    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Here to Stay hits you from the first paragraphs about how people of color don't get happy endings in stories like everyone else. I mean, come on. Why do you have...

    This was a good read on so many levels. It addressed many current, controversial issues including (but not limited to) bullying, cyberbullying, racism, classism, and immigration. The author is local, and I heard her speak at an event in the fall. This may have swayed me a bit when read...

    What a sweet story. My community has done a lot of horrible, Islamophobic things to our Middle Eastern and Asian populations in the past couple years, so this book hit me really hard. I loved Bijan, and I absolutely loved his mother. A necessary book. ...