On the Future: Prospects for Humanity

On the Future: Prospects for Humanity

A provocative and inspiring look at the future of humanity and science from world-renowned scientist and bestselling author Martin Rees Humanity has reached a critical moment. Our world is unsettled and rapidly changing, and we face existential risks over the next century. Various outcomes--good and bad--are possible. Yet our approach to the future is characterized by short A provocative and inspiring look at the future of humanity and science from world-renowned scientist and bestselling ...

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Title:On the Future: Prospects for Humanity
Author:Martin J. Rees
Rating:
Genres:Science
ISBN:On the Future: Prospects for Humanity
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:272 pages pages

On the Future: Prospects for Humanity Reviews

  • Chris
    Dec 27, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

  • Jim Witkins
    Dec 09, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

    The book basically reflects the author's view of how upcoming humanity may be affected by the various advancements in science, technology and engineering, based on his perceptions of subsequent human actions and directions. Readers, depending on their knowledge and awareness of current...

    Excellent read. Concise and to the point. Rees doesn't beat around the bush about the hurdles humanity faces in regards to planet Earth. However, his ideas and thoughts about the future end on a positive note, which says that our solutions to the problems we face will be through twenty...

    This should be required reading to any student at middle and high school level. I loved that the autor took a stand on such critical issues (such as Global Warming). We need to return to rationality. Great read, awe inspiring, wonderful. I only wish it was longer. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of February, 2019, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1.... Search for me on Google for many more reviews and recommendations ...

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    A disappointedly superficial attempt from an acclaimed astronomer to evaluate the prospects for humanity. I could not find a uniquely novel idea in this book. Good for a casual read on a rainy afternoon. ...

    Reminds me of Harari and his book "Sapiens", in the way that synthesizes and relates the information well, but nothing new is added and existing ideas are not developed in any more depth than in many other books. ...

    A techno realist makes his case for a more global, long term, ethical way of thinking (science) to solve humanities? mounting challenges. We should listen, and rethink our priorities as we focus on our future. ...

  • Lindsey
    Jan 20, 2019

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

    The book basically reflects the author's view of how upcoming humanity may be affected by the various advancements in science, technology and engineering, based on his perceptions of subsequent human actions and directions. Readers, depending on their knowledge and awareness of current...

    Excellent read. Concise and to the point. Rees doesn't beat around the bush about the hurdles humanity faces in regards to planet Earth. However, his ideas and thoughts about the future end on a positive note, which says that our solutions to the problems we face will be through twenty...

  • Chuck
    Oct 28, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

  • D.L. Morrese
    Jan 15, 2019

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

  • Brian Clegg
    Oct 23, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

  • Fernando Escobar
    Jan 07, 2019

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

    The book basically reflects the author's view of how upcoming humanity may be affected by the various advancements in science, technology and engineering, based on his perceptions of subsequent human actions and directions. Readers, depending on their knowledge and awareness of current...

    Excellent read. Concise and to the point. Rees doesn't beat around the bush about the hurdles humanity faces in regards to planet Earth. However, his ideas and thoughts about the future end on a positive note, which says that our solutions to the problems we face will be through twenty...

    This should be required reading to any student at middle and high school level. I loved that the autor took a stand on such critical issues (such as Global Warming). We need to return to rationality. Great read, awe inspiring, wonderful. I only wish it was longer. ...

  • Dan Graser
    Dec 02, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

  • Peter Tillman
    Dec 23, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

  • Jimmy
    Feb 15, 2019

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

    The book basically reflects the author's view of how upcoming humanity may be affected by the various advancements in science, technology and engineering, based on his perceptions of subsequent human actions and directions. Readers, depending on their knowledge and awareness of current...

  • Simon Hohenadl
    Dec 11, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

    The book basically reflects the author's view of how upcoming humanity may be affected by the various advancements in science, technology and engineering, based on his perceptions of subsequent human actions and directions. Readers, depending on their knowledge and awareness of current...

    Excellent read. Concise and to the point. Rees doesn't beat around the bush about the hurdles humanity faces in regards to planet Earth. However, his ideas and thoughts about the future end on a positive note, which says that our solutions to the problems we face will be through twenty...

    This should be required reading to any student at middle and high school level. I loved that the autor took a stand on such critical issues (such as Global Warming). We need to return to rationality. Great read, awe inspiring, wonderful. I only wish it was longer. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of February, 2019, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1.... Search for me on Google for many more reviews and recommendations ...

    ?????????? ???????? ? ?????????? ?????? ??? ????????? ????????? ??? ?? ???????? ???? ????????? ???????? ????? ? ?????? ?????????? ????????/????????? ?? ??...

    A disappointedly superficial attempt from an acclaimed astronomer to evaluate the prospects for humanity. I could not find a uniquely novel idea in this book. Good for a casual read on a rainy afternoon. ...

    Reminds me of Harari and his book "Sapiens", in the way that synthesizes and relates the information well, but nothing new is added and existing ideas are not developed in any more depth than in many other books. ...

    A techno realist makes his case for a more global, long term, ethical way of thinking (science) to solve humanities? mounting challenges. We should listen, and rethink our priorities as we focus on our future. ...

    I found this book fairly inspiring and enjoyed the far future predictions he made towards the end, but I really didn't enjoy the first half of the book too much. I understand it was a short book, but I felt the first half, the closer future to now, really lacked evidence to support his...

    Like having a long chat in the pub with a wickedly smart chap about "what's it all about and what's next". Sobering and fairly hopeful I think. ...

    Ho hum. I felt I was reading an overly long New Yorker article. Lots of opinion about the future a few bits seeminy like science fiction. Was this book really necessary? ...

    Entertaining, nothing new here. ...

  • Tasha
    Nov 08, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

  • Eugene LeCouteur
    Dec 29, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

    The book basically reflects the author's view of how upcoming humanity may be affected by the various advancements in science, technology and engineering, based on his perceptions of subsequent human actions and directions. Readers, depending on their knowledge and awareness of current...

    Excellent read. Concise and to the point. Rees doesn't beat around the bush about the hurdles humanity faces in regards to planet Earth. However, his ideas and thoughts about the future end on a positive note, which says that our solutions to the problems we face will be through twenty...

    This should be required reading to any student at middle and high school level. I loved that the autor took a stand on such critical issues (such as Global Warming). We need to return to rationality. Great read, awe inspiring, wonderful. I only wish it was longer. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of February, 2019, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1.... Search for me on Google for many more reviews and recommendations ...

    ?????????? ???????? ? ?????????? ?????? ??? ????????? ????????? ??? ?? ???????? ???? ????????? ???????? ????? ? ?????? ?????????? ????????/????????? ?? ??...

    A disappointedly superficial attempt from an acclaimed astronomer to evaluate the prospects for humanity. I could not find a uniquely novel idea in this book. Good for a casual read on a rainy afternoon. ...

    Reminds me of Harari and his book "Sapiens", in the way that synthesizes and relates the information well, but nothing new is added and existing ideas are not developed in any more depth than in many other books. ...

    A techno realist makes his case for a more global, long term, ethical way of thinking (science) to solve humanities? mounting challenges. We should listen, and rethink our priorities as we focus on our future. ...

    I found this book fairly inspiring and enjoyed the far future predictions he made towards the end, but I really didn't enjoy the first half of the book too much. I understand it was a short book, but I felt the first half, the closer future to now, really lacked evidence to support his...

    Like having a long chat in the pub with a wickedly smart chap about "what's it all about and what's next". Sobering and fairly hopeful I think. ...

    Ho hum. I felt I was reading an overly long New Yorker article. Lots of opinion about the future a few bits seeminy like science fiction. Was this book really necessary? ...

  • Mike Stolfi
    Nov 15, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

  • Carlos Vasconcelos
    Jan 10, 2019

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

    The book basically reflects the author's view of how upcoming humanity may be affected by the various advancements in science, technology and engineering, based on his perceptions of subsequent human actions and directions. Readers, depending on their knowledge and awareness of current...

    Excellent read. Concise and to the point. Rees doesn't beat around the bush about the hurdles humanity faces in regards to planet Earth. However, his ideas and thoughts about the future end on a positive note, which says that our solutions to the problems we face will be through twenty...

    This should be required reading to any student at middle and high school level. I loved that the autor took a stand on such critical issues (such as Global Warming). We need to return to rationality. Great read, awe inspiring, wonderful. I only wish it was longer. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of February, 2019, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1.... Search for me on Google for many more reviews and recommendations ...

    ?????????? ???????? ? ?????????? ?????? ??? ????????? ????????? ??? ?? ???????? ???? ????????? ???????? ????? ? ?????? ?????????? ????????/????????? ?? ??...

    A disappointedly superficial attempt from an acclaimed astronomer to evaluate the prospects for humanity. I could not find a uniquely novel idea in this book. Good for a casual read on a rainy afternoon. ...

    Reminds me of Harari and his book "Sapiens", in the way that synthesizes and relates the information well, but nothing new is added and existing ideas are not developed in any more depth than in many other books. ...

  • Brian Mikołajczyk
    Nov 01, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

  • Peter Mcloughlin
    Dec 26, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

  • BlackOxford
    Nov 29, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

  • Stephen Douglas Rowland
    Nov 08, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

  • Max
    Jan 19, 2019

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

    The book basically reflects the author's view of how upcoming humanity may be affected by the various advancements in science, technology and engineering, based on his perceptions of subsequent human actions and directions. Readers, depending on their knowledge and awareness of current...

    Excellent read. Concise and to the point. Rees doesn't beat around the bush about the hurdles humanity faces in regards to planet Earth. However, his ideas and thoughts about the future end on a positive note, which says that our solutions to the problems we face will be through twenty...

    This should be required reading to any student at middle and high school level. I loved that the autor took a stand on such critical issues (such as Global Warming). We need to return to rationality. Great read, awe inspiring, wonderful. I only wish it was longer. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of February, 2019, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1.... Search for me on Google for many more reviews and recommendations ...

    ?????????? ???????? ? ?????????? ?????? ??? ????????? ????????? ??? ?? ???????? ???? ????????? ???????? ????? ? ?????? ?????????? ????????/????????? ?? ??...

    A disappointedly superficial attempt from an acclaimed astronomer to evaluate the prospects for humanity. I could not find a uniquely novel idea in this book. Good for a casual read on a rainy afternoon. ...

    Reminds me of Harari and his book "Sapiens", in the way that synthesizes and relates the information well, but nothing new is added and existing ideas are not developed in any more depth than in many other books. ...

    A techno realist makes his case for a more global, long term, ethical way of thinking (science) to solve humanities? mounting challenges. We should listen, and rethink our priorities as we focus on our future. ...

    I found this book fairly inspiring and enjoyed the far future predictions he made towards the end, but I really didn't enjoy the first half of the book too much. I understand it was a short book, but I felt the first half, the closer future to now, really lacked evidence to support his...

    Like having a long chat in the pub with a wickedly smart chap about "what's it all about and what's next". Sobering and fairly hopeful I think. ...

  • Faust Mephisto
    Dec 22, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

    The book basically reflects the author's view of how upcoming humanity may be affected by the various advancements in science, technology and engineering, based on his perceptions of subsequent human actions and directions. Readers, depending on their knowledge and awareness of current...

    Excellent read. Concise and to the point. Rees doesn't beat around the bush about the hurdles humanity faces in regards to planet Earth. However, his ideas and thoughts about the future end on a positive note, which says that our solutions to the problems we face will be through twenty...

    This should be required reading to any student at middle and high school level. I loved that the autor took a stand on such critical issues (such as Global Warming). We need to return to rationality. Great read, awe inspiring, wonderful. I only wish it was longer. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of February, 2019, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1.... Search for me on Google for many more reviews and recommendations ...

    ?????????? ???????? ? ?????????? ?????? ??? ????????? ????????? ??? ?? ???????? ???? ????????? ???????? ????? ? ?????? ?????????? ????????/????????? ?? ??...

    A disappointedly superficial attempt from an acclaimed astronomer to evaluate the prospects for humanity. I could not find a uniquely novel idea in this book. Good for a casual read on a rainy afternoon. ...

  • Lisa
    Oct 13, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

  • Mathilde Kallekleiv Vedøy
    Nov 07, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

  • Andy
    Nov 04, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

  • Stevo Brock
    Feb 02, 2019

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

    The book basically reflects the author's view of how upcoming humanity may be affected by the various advancements in science, technology and engineering, based on his perceptions of subsequent human actions and directions. Readers, depending on their knowledge and awareness of current...

    Excellent read. Concise and to the point. Rees doesn't beat around the bush about the hurdles humanity faces in regards to planet Earth. However, his ideas and thoughts about the future end on a positive note, which says that our solutions to the problems we face will be through twenty...

    This should be required reading to any student at middle and high school level. I loved that the autor took a stand on such critical issues (such as Global Warming). We need to return to rationality. Great read, awe inspiring, wonderful. I only wish it was longer. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of February, 2019, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1.... Search for me on Google for many more reviews and recommendations ...

  • Koohyar
    Nov 22, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

  • Jerry Wall
    Oct 20, 2018

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

  • Kirill Blokker
    Feb 10, 2019

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

  • Scott Jann
    Jan 29, 2019

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

    The book basically reflects the author's view of how upcoming humanity may be affected by the various advancements in science, technology and engineering, based on his perceptions of subsequent human actions and directions. Readers, depending on their knowledge and awareness of current...

    Excellent read. Concise and to the point. Rees doesn't beat around the bush about the hurdles humanity faces in regards to planet Earth. However, his ideas and thoughts about the future end on a positive note, which says that our solutions to the problems we face will be through twenty...

    This should be required reading to any student at middle and high school level. I loved that the autor took a stand on such critical issues (such as Global Warming). We need to return to rationality. Great read, awe inspiring, wonderful. I only wish it was longer. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of February, 2019, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1.... Search for me on Google for many more reviews and recommendations ...

    ?????????? ???????? ? ?????????? ?????? ??? ????????? ????????? ??? ?? ???????? ???? ????????? ???????? ????? ? ?????? ?????????? ????????/????????? ?? ??...

    A disappointedly superficial attempt from an acclaimed astronomer to evaluate the prospects for humanity. I could not find a uniquely novel idea in this book. Good for a casual read on a rainy afternoon. ...

    Reminds me of Harari and his book "Sapiens", in the way that synthesizes and relates the information well, but nothing new is added and existing ideas are not developed in any more depth than in many other books. ...

    A techno realist makes his case for a more global, long term, ethical way of thinking (science) to solve humanities? mounting challenges. We should listen, and rethink our priorities as we focus on our future. ...

    I found this book fairly inspiring and enjoyed the far future predictions he made towards the end, but I really didn't enjoy the first half of the book too much. I understand it was a short book, but I felt the first half, the closer future to now, really lacked evidence to support his...

  • Oleksandr
    Feb 05, 2019

    The Bleakest of Expectations The substance of this book is scientific, namely the most important threats to human life on Earth and their elimination or mitigation. But Rees?s intention, of course, is political. He understandably wants to contribute to the generation of a consensu...

    "A feature of science is that as the frontiers of our knowledge are extended, new mysteries, just beyond the frontiers, come into sharper focus." To be able to look into the future, one must see the present in its complex, chaotic, simultaneous varieties. With charm and clarity, Ma...

    It is okay. Not much material that I haven't seen in other places even in other books by Rees. Still, it is good to meditate on the meaning of the next one hundred years which could be critical for the human project. My gut feeling is if, and it is a big if, we can make it out of the 2...

    "The trouble with predicting the future is that it is very hard." -- Yogi Berra Martin Rees gets off to a weak start in this slender book, in which (so far) he has little of interest to say. Or so is my impression, halfway in. I'm surprised, as I read the book because of Sabine Hos...

    There have been a number of books written in the past decade by eminent scientists about their hopes, predictions, and worries for the 21st century and beyond. This latest entry from Martin Rees is a fine survey of several of these ideas written with his customary elegance and eruditio...

    When I was at school we had a great young history teacher who got everyone in the class to go out and buy a copy of Mao's Little Red Book. Some parents were decidedly unhappy, but it was a fascinating exercise, and though I found most of the contents impenetrable drivel, it was somethi...

    Unoriginal -- all this information can be found in similar, better books, and Rees's nonstop use of unnecessary quotation marks nearly gave me a heart attack. Fire your editor, dude. ...

    Although there were some really good parts in the book, but nothing is discussed in depth. Only superficial ideas. If you want a casual read, go for it ...

    I didn't feel that the way this book was marketed at all reflects its contents. It has no real unifying argument or point to make, but is just a collection of the author's brief thoughts on various subjects. Sadly he never really spends long enough on any one topic to say anything inte...

    This book covered so many things: AI, space travel, climate change, biotech, and more. I loved how this book gave such a wide-ranging overview that I (a non-scientist) could easily grasp. ...

    Astrophysicist and former President of the Royal Society, Martin Rees discusses his concerns and predictions for the future of humanity. He is concerned with a nuclear apocalypse, climate change, and an extinction-level asteroid impact. He also predicts our future in the cosmos if we d...

    I recently saw Martin Rees speak in Chicago and bought this book. It reads very much in the same way Rees speaks - bright, sparkly, optimistic, but also direct and opinionated about the dire challenges our world faces. An astronomer by trade and training, he is adept at addressing a wi...

    This is a brief and superficial overview of what and where we are (in cosmic terms) and of the challenges we face as a species. It's a well-written summary, but there are no startling revelations or insights. Rees's reasonable recommendation for humanity is, well, to be reasonable. I d...

    Compelling and instructive. ...

    A lot of very practical ideas that have little likelihood of ever happening because we evolved from scavenging pack oriented hominids, & our primitive social order still trumps all else. It's too bad, really. ...

    One of the rare books where the impression is that of sitting at the knees of a wise elder thinker and learning form them resolutely, gently, and satisfactorily. Future: what it can bring, what are the constituents that will influence it, how to react to it, and how to interact with i...

    This was a 'wonderful' read. ...

    A good book for starters on these subjects. For more well-read readers on futuristic topics, this might feel like a lot of open doors. But I rate it 4 out of 5, because I think there's a lot of people who can learn alot from this book - and any book like this with it. As is with th...

    The book basically reflects the author's view of how upcoming humanity may be affected by the various advancements in science, technology and engineering, based on his perceptions of subsequent human actions and directions. Readers, depending on their knowledge and awareness of current...

    Excellent read. Concise and to the point. Rees doesn't beat around the bush about the hurdles humanity faces in regards to planet Earth. However, his ideas and thoughts about the future end on a positive note, which says that our solutions to the problems we face will be through twenty...

    This should be required reading to any student at middle and high school level. I loved that the autor took a stand on such critical issues (such as Global Warming). We need to return to rationality. Great read, awe inspiring, wonderful. I only wish it was longer. ...

    This book was a Best of the Best for the month of February, 2019, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet. http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1.... Search for me on Google for many more reviews and recommendations ...

    ?????????? ???????? ? ?????????? ?????? ??? ????????? ????????? ??? ?? ???????? ???? ????????? ???????? ????? ? ?????? ?????????? ????????/????????? ?? ??...