The Crossway

The Crossway

A BBC Radio 4 'Book of the Week' in 2018. In 2013 Guy Stagg made a pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. Though a non-believer, he began the journey after suffering several years of mental illness, hoping the ritual would heal him. For ten months he hiked alone on ancient paths, crossing ten countries and more than 5,500 kilometres. The Crossway is an account of this ext A BBC Radio 4 'Book of the Week' in 2018. In 2013 Guy Stagg made a pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. Though...

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Title:The Crossway
Author:Guy Stagg
Rating:
Genres:Travel
ISBN:1509844570
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:416 pages pages

The Crossway Reviews

  • Gaff
    Jan 25, 2019

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

  • Laura
    Jun 15, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

  • Fawe
    Oct 25, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Purple
    Aug 11, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

  • Jojo
    Jul 08, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

  • Micheal
    Jan 08, 2019

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Sherilyn
    Jan 06, 2019

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

  • Vod
    Sep 29, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

    ...

    ...

  • Paul
    Oct 13, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

  • Kathleen
    Oct 21, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Steve Streeter
    Jul 12, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

  • Damien Murphy
    Nov 03, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

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  • Treakie P.
    Jun 27, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

  • Radiantflux
    Jan 05, 2019

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

  • Adeptus Fringilla
    Oct 28, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

  • Ruth Dipple
    Sep 21, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

  • Lien
    Nov 02, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

    ...

    ...

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  • Nick Spencer
    Nov 06, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

  • Trevor Moseley
    Nov 14, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

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    ...

  • Alexander Van Leadam
    Oct 28, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

  • Alex
    Nov 12, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Tessa Hagity
    Dec 16, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

    ...

  • Mrs HA Finlayson
    Dec 22, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

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  • Mimi
    Aug 14, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

  • GBL
    Dec 14, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

  • Anna Kurgan
    Sep 14, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • WhiteNancy
    Sep 08, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

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  • sean exner baumann
    Jul 26, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

    Focused more on religious history rather than the pilgrimage itself. This made it quite boring. ...

    An amazing account of an amazing journey. Reflective, honest, thought provoking. ...

    Thought provoking and reflective .. Guy Stagg opened up his heart and soul to share his journey - a beautiful meditation on pilgrimage ...

    Excellent story. Well told. ...

    I always enjoy hearing about activities and events that I believe (or hope) I will never take part in myself. This pleasant account of a pilgrimage fulfilled this want. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Ellie Broughton
    Sep 20, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...

    3.5* ...

    engaging and honest ...

    Well written but better suited to someone more interested in the history of Christianity. ...

  • Lucy
    Oct 31, 2018

    2013 dawns and Guy Stagg has decided that he wants his life to take a different direction. Having suffered for years from mental illness culminating in a nervous breakdown, he is desperate for a way to get better. He had decided to walk the 3,400 miles from Canterbury to Jerusalem as ...

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week: An epic journey, but also an intimate one. After several years of mental illness, Guy Stagg set off one morning, from London, to walk to Canterbury. Ill-prepared and not entirely clear why he was doing this, he nevertheless got there. Exhausted, he...

    4th book for 2019. In 2013, Guy Stagg, an atheist suffering from a deep spiritual crisis, decided to walk the pilgrim trails from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The book has three intertwined stories: the story of the walk itself, the places Stagg visits, the people he meets; a histor...

    The Crossway is a big achievement, featuring an epic journey and some blistering honesty about the author's mental health, but the final section left a bad taste in my mouth, I'm sorry to say. The book tells the story of Guy Stagg's 10-month journey on foot from Canterbury to Jerusa...

    The book has charm as a journal of an admittedly impressive yet foolhardy journey. The author manages to convey the combination of actions and thoughts that describes his experiences in a direct, engaging manner. Unfortunately, the journey is also a search for some higher truths and wh...

    The Crossway by Guy Stagg chronicles his pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem in 2013. He went on pilgrimage to try to manage the demons in his life and to try to discover himself; he goes out to look within. This is a book about humanity; we learn about ourselves as we see Stagg d...

    This was recommended to me, and I'm glad it was because there was a lot to like in this account of Stagg?s (agnostic) pilgrimage from Canterbury to Jerusalem. The way he related his journey to dealing with the aftermath of crisis and depression reminded me slightly of Richard Mabey?...

    This book describes a sort of Dantean journey across Europe - destination Jerusalem - in which the author makes, or hopes to make, a journey of self-discovery. Consequently much of the interest hangs on whether the reader feels interested in the author and his problems. That could be a...

    From the outset, I really enjoyed the idea of this book. The story he was telling really drew me in. There were some very moving passages and descriptions of the places he visited and the people he met. I really valued his honesty, particularly the parts of the journey that didn't lead...