My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2

My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2

The sequel series to the award-winning My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness! Living on her own is harder than Nagata Kabi expected. Building relationships is difficult too, but with a new friendship to cultivate and a new perspective on her family, she's doing her best to open up and become a warm, compassionate person!...

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Title:My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2
Author:Kabi Nagata
Rating:
Genres:Sequential Art
ISBN:1626929998
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:176 pages pages

My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2 Reviews

  • David Schaafsma
    Apr 16, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

  • Esteli
    Jan 16, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

  • tatterpunk
    Feb 17, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

  • Michelle
    May 27, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to h...

    The second volume for Nagata Kabi's manga begins with a bit of a downer news: it didn't work out between her and the new friend that we saw in the ending of Vol.1. And despite not explicitly saying why, she shows us in the rest of the manga: for her to get into a romantic relationship,...

    (4.5/5) I?ve rec?d Nagata Kabi?s two previous works ? My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness and My Solo Exchange Diary ? and I?m reccing this one, too. My Solo Exchange Diary 2 (which I believe concludes the series) chronicles the artist?s ongoing battle with depression a...

    I'm terribly sad to see this series to go. Peering into Nagata's life, her struggles with self-acceptance and worth, managing her relationships with her mother, father, friends, and possible girlfriends - it was all so much to take in and left me crying several times. This particular e...

    My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2 covers the author's life post-book deal of her first released manga My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness as she grapples with the residual aftermath of her parent's opinions of her first manga as well as battling crippling depression and loneliness that a...

    It was sometimes difficult to read this story because the harsh reality of a person living through anxiety, depression and self-abuse does not make for a pleasant experience. But this is exactly the reason why this book is so precious: it's honest, even brutally so. The author takes an...

    I've genuinely never read anything like Kabi Nagata's memoirs about what it's like to be young and hopeless and mentally ill, even if in the two My Solo Exchange Diary volumes the hopelessness is more an internal feeling rather than an external reality. She's incredibly honest and vuln...

    "I wanted my mother to love me. I wanted to be her good little girl. I wanted her to forgive me. None of that was the book's fault. But it was such a perfect symbol that I couldn't stop myself from hating it." "Don't bully yourself anymore. You've bullied yourself plenty already." ...

    I think this may be the final one in this series, but it was a good ending. I enjoyed watching Kabi grow as a person and learn more about herself as well as reach out to family and friends. It was hard watching her struggle with depression, especially as someone has had it twice in the...

    It came with them mail today and I just had to devour it immediately! I have been waiting for the release for months and haven't been disappointed. I love the honesty in Nagata Kabis work, reflecting about her life experiences in relatable way that makes you feel for and like the chara...

    This is an epistolary manga as she writes letters to herself. I realized after reading a self-harming episode that the naked figure on the cover she is talking to is herself. This volume is not about her sexuality, but her depression. She realizes how much it has skewed her relationshi...

  • Jon Ureña
    May 23, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

  • Clare
    Jun 20, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to h...

    The second volume for Nagata Kabi's manga begins with a bit of a downer news: it didn't work out between her and the new friend that we saw in the ending of Vol.1. And despite not explicitly saying why, she shows us in the rest of the manga: for her to get into a romantic relationship,...

    (4.5/5) I?ve rec?d Nagata Kabi?s two previous works ? My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness and My Solo Exchange Diary ? and I?m reccing this one, too. My Solo Exchange Diary 2 (which I believe concludes the series) chronicles the artist?s ongoing battle with depression a...

    I'm terribly sad to see this series to go. Peering into Nagata's life, her struggles with self-acceptance and worth, managing her relationships with her mother, father, friends, and possible girlfriends - it was all so much to take in and left me crying several times. This particular e...

    My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2 covers the author's life post-book deal of her first released manga My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness as she grapples with the residual aftermath of her parent's opinions of her first manga as well as battling crippling depression and loneliness that a...

    It was sometimes difficult to read this story because the harsh reality of a person living through anxiety, depression and self-abuse does not make for a pleasant experience. But this is exactly the reason why this book is so precious: it's honest, even brutally so. The author takes an...

    I've genuinely never read anything like Kabi Nagata's memoirs about what it's like to be young and hopeless and mentally ill, even if in the two My Solo Exchange Diary volumes the hopelessness is more an internal feeling rather than an external reality. She's incredibly honest and vuln...

  • Kathryn Kania
    May 06, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

  • Jes Jones
    Feb 28, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to h...

    The second volume for Nagata Kabi's manga begins with a bit of a downer news: it didn't work out between her and the new friend that we saw in the ending of Vol.1. And despite not explicitly saying why, she shows us in the rest of the manga: for her to get into a romantic relationship,...

    (4.5/5) I?ve rec?d Nagata Kabi?s two previous works ? My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness and My Solo Exchange Diary ? and I?m reccing this one, too. My Solo Exchange Diary 2 (which I believe concludes the series) chronicles the artist?s ongoing battle with depression a...

    I'm terribly sad to see this series to go. Peering into Nagata's life, her struggles with self-acceptance and worth, managing her relationships with her mother, father, friends, and possible girlfriends - it was all so much to take in and left me crying several times. This particular e...

    My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2 covers the author's life post-book deal of her first released manga My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness as she grapples with the residual aftermath of her parent's opinions of her first manga as well as battling crippling depression and loneliness that a...

  • Emily
    Apr 16, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

  • D
    Mar 06, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to h...

    The second volume for Nagata Kabi's manga begins with a bit of a downer news: it didn't work out between her and the new friend that we saw in the ending of Vol.1. And despite not explicitly saying why, she shows us in the rest of the manga: for her to get into a romantic relationship,...

  • Sophie
    Jun 07, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to h...

    The second volume for Nagata Kabi's manga begins with a bit of a downer news: it didn't work out between her and the new friend that we saw in the ending of Vol.1. And despite not explicitly saying why, she shows us in the rest of the manga: for her to get into a romantic relationship,...

    (4.5/5) I?ve rec?d Nagata Kabi?s two previous works ? My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness and My Solo Exchange Diary ? and I?m reccing this one, too. My Solo Exchange Diary 2 (which I believe concludes the series) chronicles the artist?s ongoing battle with depression a...

    I'm terribly sad to see this series to go. Peering into Nagata's life, her struggles with self-acceptance and worth, managing her relationships with her mother, father, friends, and possible girlfriends - it was all so much to take in and left me crying several times. This particular e...

    My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2 covers the author's life post-book deal of her first released manga My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness as she grapples with the residual aftermath of her parent's opinions of her first manga as well as battling crippling depression and loneliness that a...

    It was sometimes difficult to read this story because the harsh reality of a person living through anxiety, depression and self-abuse does not make for a pleasant experience. But this is exactly the reason why this book is so precious: it's honest, even brutally so. The author takes an...

    I've genuinely never read anything like Kabi Nagata's memoirs about what it's like to be young and hopeless and mentally ill, even if in the two My Solo Exchange Diary volumes the hopelessness is more an internal feeling rather than an external reality. She's incredibly honest and vuln...

    "I wanted my mother to love me. I wanted to be her good little girl. I wanted her to forgive me. None of that was the book's fault. But it was such a perfect symbol that I couldn't stop myself from hating it." "Don't bully yourself anymore. You've bullied yourself plenty already." ...

  • Valkyrie Vu
    Aug 22, 2018

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

  • Mateen Mahboubi
    Apr 28, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

  • Jessica Peregrym
    Oct 08, 2018

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

  • Marta
    Mar 31, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to h...

    The second volume for Nagata Kabi's manga begins with a bit of a downer news: it didn't work out between her and the new friend that we saw in the ending of Vol.1. And despite not explicitly saying why, she shows us in the rest of the manga: for her to get into a romantic relationship,...

    (4.5/5) I?ve rec?d Nagata Kabi?s two previous works ? My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness and My Solo Exchange Diary ? and I?m reccing this one, too. My Solo Exchange Diary 2 (which I believe concludes the series) chronicles the artist?s ongoing battle with depression a...

    I'm terribly sad to see this series to go. Peering into Nagata's life, her struggles with self-acceptance and worth, managing her relationships with her mother, father, friends, and possible girlfriends - it was all so much to take in and left me crying several times. This particular e...

    My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2 covers the author's life post-book deal of her first released manga My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness as she grapples with the residual aftermath of her parent's opinions of her first manga as well as battling crippling depression and loneliness that a...

    It was sometimes difficult to read this story because the harsh reality of a person living through anxiety, depression and self-abuse does not make for a pleasant experience. But this is exactly the reason why this book is so precious: it's honest, even brutally so. The author takes an...

  • Rod Brown
    Mar 22, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

  • Meaghan Steeves
    Jan 17, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

  • Maia
    Apr 14, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

  • Jhosy
    Mar 03, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

  • Raquel
    Feb 16, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

  • Benjamin Kass
    Feb 23, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

  • Sailor
    Apr 03, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

  • Chloe Crist
    Dec 20, 2018

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to h...

  • Miranda
    Feb 26, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to h...

    The second volume for Nagata Kabi's manga begins with a bit of a downer news: it didn't work out between her and the new friend that we saw in the ending of Vol.1. And despite not explicitly saying why, she shows us in the rest of the manga: for her to get into a romantic relationship,...

    (4.5/5) I?ve rec?d Nagata Kabi?s two previous works ? My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness and My Solo Exchange Diary ? and I?m reccing this one, too. My Solo Exchange Diary 2 (which I believe concludes the series) chronicles the artist?s ongoing battle with depression a...

    I'm terribly sad to see this series to go. Peering into Nagata's life, her struggles with self-acceptance and worth, managing her relationships with her mother, father, friends, and possible girlfriends - it was all so much to take in and left me crying several times. This particular e...

  • Jenny
    Mar 02, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to h...

    The second volume for Nagata Kabi's manga begins with a bit of a downer news: it didn't work out between her and the new friend that we saw in the ending of Vol.1. And despite not explicitly saying why, she shows us in the rest of the manga: for her to get into a romantic relationship,...

    (4.5/5) I?ve rec?d Nagata Kabi?s two previous works ? My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness and My Solo Exchange Diary ? and I?m reccing this one, too. My Solo Exchange Diary 2 (which I believe concludes the series) chronicles the artist?s ongoing battle with depression a...

    I'm terribly sad to see this series to go. Peering into Nagata's life, her struggles with self-acceptance and worth, managing her relationships with her mother, father, friends, and possible girlfriends - it was all so much to take in and left me crying several times. This particular e...

    My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2 covers the author's life post-book deal of her first released manga My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness as she grapples with the residual aftermath of her parent's opinions of her first manga as well as battling crippling depression and loneliness that a...

    It was sometimes difficult to read this story because the harsh reality of a person living through anxiety, depression and self-abuse does not make for a pleasant experience. But this is exactly the reason why this book is so precious: it's honest, even brutally so. The author takes an...

    I've genuinely never read anything like Kabi Nagata's memoirs about what it's like to be young and hopeless and mentally ill, even if in the two My Solo Exchange Diary volumes the hopelessness is more an internal feeling rather than an external reality. She's incredibly honest and vuln...

    "I wanted my mother to love me. I wanted to be her good little girl. I wanted her to forgive me. None of that was the book's fault. But it was such a perfect symbol that I couldn't stop myself from hating it." "Don't bully yourself anymore. You've bullied yourself plenty already." ...

    I think this may be the final one in this series, but it was a good ending. I enjoyed watching Kabi grow as a person and learn more about herself as well as reach out to family and friends. It was hard watching her struggle with depression, especially as someone has had it twice in the...

  • PvOberstein
    Apr 07, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to h...

    The second volume for Nagata Kabi's manga begins with a bit of a downer news: it didn't work out between her and the new friend that we saw in the ending of Vol.1. And despite not explicitly saying why, she shows us in the rest of the manga: for her to get into a romantic relationship,...

    (4.5/5) I?ve rec?d Nagata Kabi?s two previous works ? My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness and My Solo Exchange Diary ? and I?m reccing this one, too. My Solo Exchange Diary 2 (which I believe concludes the series) chronicles the artist?s ongoing battle with depression a...

  • Alex
    Feb 14, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

  • Ivo Lederer
    Feb 20, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to h...

    The second volume for Nagata Kabi's manga begins with a bit of a downer news: it didn't work out between her and the new friend that we saw in the ending of Vol.1. And despite not explicitly saying why, she shows us in the rest of the manga: for her to get into a romantic relationship,...

    (4.5/5) I?ve rec?d Nagata Kabi?s two previous works ? My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness and My Solo Exchange Diary ? and I?m reccing this one, too. My Solo Exchange Diary 2 (which I believe concludes the series) chronicles the artist?s ongoing battle with depression a...

    I'm terribly sad to see this series to go. Peering into Nagata's life, her struggles with self-acceptance and worth, managing her relationships with her mother, father, friends, and possible girlfriends - it was all so much to take in and left me crying several times. This particular e...

    My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2 covers the author's life post-book deal of her first released manga My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness as she grapples with the residual aftermath of her parent's opinions of her first manga as well as battling crippling depression and loneliness that a...

    It was sometimes difficult to read this story because the harsh reality of a person living through anxiety, depression and self-abuse does not make for a pleasant experience. But this is exactly the reason why this book is so precious: it's honest, even brutally so. The author takes an...

    I've genuinely never read anything like Kabi Nagata's memoirs about what it's like to be young and hopeless and mentally ill, even if in the two My Solo Exchange Diary volumes the hopelessness is more an internal feeling rather than an external reality. She's incredibly honest and vuln...

    "I wanted my mother to love me. I wanted to be her good little girl. I wanted her to forgive me. None of that was the book's fault. But it was such a perfect symbol that I couldn't stop myself from hating it." "Don't bully yourself anymore. You've bullied yourself plenty already." ...

    I think this may be the final one in this series, but it was a good ending. I enjoyed watching Kabi grow as a person and learn more about herself as well as reach out to family and friends. It was hard watching her struggle with depression, especially as someone has had it twice in the...

    It came with them mail today and I just had to devour it immediately! I have been waiting for the release for months and haven't been disappointed. I love the honesty in Nagata Kabis work, reflecting about her life experiences in relatable way that makes you feel for and like the chara...

  • Sara Mul
    Jan 01, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

  • Ainelle June
    Mar 03, 2019

    So, I read the first book by Nagata, My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness, about the clinically shy/introvert/lonely Nagata trying to make human connections, trying to come out, going to an escort service. But from the first I thought this wasn't primarily a story about LGBTQ issues, ...

    This is a type of book that can't be judged or evaluated because it is about the author's personal life. How can one evaluate the life of another and give stars through it? This is one of the topics the author deals with in this volume. As she realized that in writing her life she en...

    This entry is more frustrating than the previous two as the author mostly sets aside LGBTQ issues and focuses on the anxiety and depression which eventually result in her voluntary hospitalization following a strong bout of substance abuse. Outside forces seem to be affecting the na...

    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it...

    Progress, as they say, is a spiral. I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who...

    The third entry in a series that started with "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness". There the author opened up about dealing with severe mental issues for her entire life, which led her to seek her first intimate human contact with a prostitute. In this third volume, I'm saddened to...

    I think her openness and vulnerability is very brave, but this is not something I want to reread or a series I can continue reading. It reminds me too much of how I feel at my worst and just makes me feel scared for my future. ...

    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I ha...

    A powerfully honest book about mental illness/depression. Nagata really opens up and gives us a glimpse into how debilitating parts of her life can be. I hope that she finds the stability and care that she needs. ...

    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less ...

    This second volume of Kabi Nagata's diary comics deals mainly with mental health, depression, self-harm and hospitalization. The drawing style gets looser and looser as it goes along, which feels very appropriate given the subject matter. This is an intimate and raw portrait of someone...

    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illust...

    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :)) ...

    Woooow this one was a full opening up. Such an interesting look at her mental health journey. I just want goos thinga for her. ...

    I love the honesty and struggle in this serie, and this one hit so close to home, especially when it came to Nagata's relationship with her familly and friends. ...

    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence. ...

    A good reminder that getting better, whatever that might mean for you right now, doesn't necessarily mean a straight line pointing up. It's cycles and challenges, the slow work of learning new behaviors and creating a safer, healthier environment for yourself. Helped me figure out some...

    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself. ...

    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to h...

    The second volume for Nagata Kabi's manga begins with a bit of a downer news: it didn't work out between her and the new friend that we saw in the ending of Vol.1. And despite not explicitly saying why, she shows us in the rest of the manga: for her to get into a romantic relationship,...

    (4.5/5) I?ve rec?d Nagata Kabi?s two previous works ? My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness and My Solo Exchange Diary ? and I?m reccing this one, too. My Solo Exchange Diary 2 (which I believe concludes the series) chronicles the artist?s ongoing battle with depression a...

    I'm terribly sad to see this series to go. Peering into Nagata's life, her struggles with self-acceptance and worth, managing her relationships with her mother, father, friends, and possible girlfriends - it was all so much to take in and left me crying several times. This particular e...

    My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2 covers the author's life post-book deal of her first released manga My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness as she grapples with the residual aftermath of her parent's opinions of her first manga as well as battling crippling depression and loneliness that a...

    It was sometimes difficult to read this story because the harsh reality of a person living through anxiety, depression and self-abuse does not make for a pleasant experience. But this is exactly the reason why this book is so precious: it's honest, even brutally so. The author takes an...

    I've genuinely never read anything like Kabi Nagata's memoirs about what it's like to be young and hopeless and mentally ill, even if in the two My Solo Exchange Diary volumes the hopelessness is more an internal feeling rather than an external reality. She's incredibly honest and vuln...

    "I wanted my mother to love me. I wanted to be her good little girl. I wanted her to forgive me. None of that was the book's fault. But it was such a perfect symbol that I couldn't stop myself from hating it." "Don't bully yourself anymore. You've bullied yourself plenty already." ...

    I think this may be the final one in this series, but it was a good ending. I enjoyed watching Kabi grow as a person and learn more about herself as well as reach out to family and friends. It was hard watching her struggle with depression, especially as someone has had it twice in the...

    It came with them mail today and I just had to devour it immediately! I have been waiting for the release for months and haven't been disappointed. I love the honesty in Nagata Kabis work, reflecting about her life experiences in relatable way that makes you feel for and like the chara...

    This is an epistolary manga as she writes letters to herself. I realized after reading a self-harming episode that the naked figure on the cover she is talking to is herself. This volume is not about her sexuality, but her depression. She realizes how much it has skewed her relationshi...

    Kabi-san i super relate your previous books about how toxic life can be sometimes or how parents doesnt give a damn clue about what you feel or sometimes just simply dense or maybe just super concern about your life and maybe they expect something better because how much they appreciat...