Wild Milk

Wild Milk

Wild Milk is like Borscht Belt meets Leonora Carrington; it?s like Donald Barthelme meets Pony Head; it?s like the Brothers Grimm meet Beckett in his swim trunks at the beach. In other words, this remarkable collection of stories is unlike anything else you?ve read. ?Sabrina Orah Mark is a writer of strangeness & tenderness & undeniable brilliance. I wanted to read Wild Milk is like Borscht Belt meets Leonora Carrington; it?s like Donald Barthelme meets Pony Head; it?s ...

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Title:Wild Milk
Author:Sabrina Orah Mark
Rating:
Genres:Short Stories
ISBN:0997366680
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:168 pages pages

Wild Milk Reviews

  • Kevin
    Aug 17, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

  • Nate D
    Nov 19, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

  • Nathanimal
    Jan 01, 2019

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

    I liked the fun-house mirror quality of this book--in its content, but also in the poetics of the prose. The images and words tend to loop back in strange, exciting ways. The stories are thoughtful and quirky (in a Donald Barthelme sort of way), but usually have a sudden deepening that...

    The language here is the precise and masterful language of a poet. The tone is honest and unassuming. These are satisfying, startling, funny, sometimes gut wrenching short stories written by a poet. The stories and observations are both unique/surreal and extremely relatable. ...

    A super smart book of dreamlike spiels, each with its own internal logic just beyond our collective ken. ...

    One of the most original collections published this year. Lovers of the surreal, short shorts, and hybrid forms should pick this up today. ...

    Were there repetitions? (view spoiler)[Yes, there were repetitions. (hide spoiler)] Were the repetitions sometimes overly cute? (view spoiler)[Yes, the repetitions were sometimes overly cute. (hide spoiler)] Did we mind? (view spoiler)[Yes, we sometimes minded, but we ...

  • Alissa Hattman
    Nov 23, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

    I liked the fun-house mirror quality of this book--in its content, but also in the poetics of the prose. The images and words tend to loop back in strange, exciting ways. The stories are thoughtful and quirky (in a Donald Barthelme sort of way), but usually have a sudden deepening that...

  • Hannah
    Jul 02, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

  • Caroline
    Nov 27, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

  • Brooks
    Nov 24, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

  • Natasha
    Oct 12, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

  • Marie-Therese
    Oct 26, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

  • Mark
    Jan 05, 2019

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

  • Sarah
    Dec 22, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

  • Rachel Watkins
    Aug 05, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

  • Julia
    Oct 17, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

    I liked the fun-house mirror quality of this book--in its content, but also in the poetics of the prose. The images and words tend to loop back in strange, exciting ways. The stories are thoughtful and quirky (in a Donald Barthelme sort of way), but usually have a sudden deepening that...

    The language here is the precise and masterful language of a poet. The tone is honest and unassuming. These are satisfying, startling, funny, sometimes gut wrenching short stories written by a poet. The stories and observations are both unique/surreal and extremely relatable. ...

    A super smart book of dreamlike spiels, each with its own internal logic just beyond our collective ken. ...

    One of the most original collections published this year. Lovers of the surreal, short shorts, and hybrid forms should pick this up today. ...

    Were there repetitions? (view spoiler)[Yes, there were repetitions. (hide spoiler)] Were the repetitions sometimes overly cute? (view spoiler)[Yes, the repetitions were sometimes overly cute. (hide spoiler)] Did we mind? (view spoiler)[Yes, we sometimes minded, but we ...

    I need to read these all again to provide a proper review, but this is more than a collection of short stories. This is a world unlike any other where every sentence is unexpected and shining with love, fear, confusion, bewilderment, uncertainty, and more. Some of these three page fabl...

    What a completely wonderful read! Sabrina Orah Mark's poetic sensibilities are wound into genre-bending pieces that I can't recommend enough. This book is a happy balm (but mostly it's a book). ...

  • Bill Hsu
    Nov 07, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

  • Erika Dreifus
    Dec 18, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

  • Cherise wellreadhuman
    Jan 31, 2019

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

    I liked the fun-house mirror quality of this book--in its content, but also in the poetics of the prose. The images and words tend to loop back in strange, exciting ways. The stories are thoughtful and quirky (in a Donald Barthelme sort of way), but usually have a sudden deepening that...

    The language here is the precise and masterful language of a poet. The tone is honest and unassuming. These are satisfying, startling, funny, sometimes gut wrenching short stories written by a poet. The stories and observations are both unique/surreal and extremely relatable. ...

    A super smart book of dreamlike spiels, each with its own internal logic just beyond our collective ken. ...

    One of the most original collections published this year. Lovers of the surreal, short shorts, and hybrid forms should pick this up today. ...

    Were there repetitions? (view spoiler)[Yes, there were repetitions. (hide spoiler)] Were the repetitions sometimes overly cute? (view spoiler)[Yes, the repetitions were sometimes overly cute. (hide spoiler)] Did we mind? (view spoiler)[Yes, we sometimes minded, but we ...

    I need to read these all again to provide a proper review, but this is more than a collection of short stories. This is a world unlike any other where every sentence is unexpected and shining with love, fear, confusion, bewilderment, uncertainty, and more. Some of these three page fabl...

    What a completely wonderful read! Sabrina Orah Mark's poetic sensibilities are wound into genre-bending pieces that I can't recommend enough. This book is a happy balm (but mostly it's a book). ...

    After I finished the first story in this collection I realized I had two choices for reading further. I could either pause after each story and let it breathe and bloom on its own. Or, I could read the full collection at once without stopping to think. I chose the latter. The benefi...

    3.5 ? Have you ever picked up a book because of its cover, borrowed it, read it, not understood what you just read, but still feel like you really enjoyed it? That?s me with Wild Milk, a slim collection of stories by Sabrina Orah Mark. The first story, also titled ?Wild Milk?...

  • Maria D'alessandro
    Jan 04, 2019

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

    I liked the fun-house mirror quality of this book--in its content, but also in the poetics of the prose. The images and words tend to loop back in strange, exciting ways. The stories are thoughtful and quirky (in a Donald Barthelme sort of way), but usually have a sudden deepening that...

    The language here is the precise and masterful language of a poet. The tone is honest and unassuming. These are satisfying, startling, funny, sometimes gut wrenching short stories written by a poet. The stories and observations are both unique/surreal and extremely relatable. ...

  • Rudra
    Dec 23, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

  • Ben Robinson
    Nov 17, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

    I liked the fun-house mirror quality of this book--in its content, but also in the poetics of the prose. The images and words tend to loop back in strange, exciting ways. The stories are thoughtful and quirky (in a Donald Barthelme sort of way), but usually have a sudden deepening that...

    The language here is the precise and masterful language of a poet. The tone is honest and unassuming. These are satisfying, startling, funny, sometimes gut wrenching short stories written by a poet. The stories and observations are both unique/surreal and extremely relatable. ...

    A super smart book of dreamlike spiels, each with its own internal logic just beyond our collective ken. ...

  • Zoë Ruiz
    Sep 22, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

  • Ryan Bollenbach
    Jan 27, 2019

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

  • (jessica)
    Dec 31, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

    I liked the fun-house mirror quality of this book--in its content, but also in the poetics of the prose. The images and words tend to loop back in strange, exciting ways. The stories are thoughtful and quirky (in a Donald Barthelme sort of way), but usually have a sudden deepening that...

    The language here is the precise and masterful language of a poet. The tone is honest and unassuming. These are satisfying, startling, funny, sometimes gut wrenching short stories written by a poet. The stories and observations are both unique/surreal and extremely relatable. ...

    A super smart book of dreamlike spiels, each with its own internal logic just beyond our collective ken. ...

    One of the most original collections published this year. Lovers of the surreal, short shorts, and hybrid forms should pick this up today. ...

    Were there repetitions? (view spoiler)[Yes, there were repetitions. (hide spoiler)] Were the repetitions sometimes overly cute? (view spoiler)[Yes, the repetitions were sometimes overly cute. (hide spoiler)] Did we mind? (view spoiler)[Yes, we sometimes minded, but we ...

    I need to read these all again to provide a proper review, but this is more than a collection of short stories. This is a world unlike any other where every sentence is unexpected and shining with love, fear, confusion, bewilderment, uncertainty, and more. Some of these three page fabl...

    What a completely wonderful read! Sabrina Orah Mark's poetic sensibilities are wound into genre-bending pieces that I can't recommend enough. This book is a happy balm (but mostly it's a book). ...

    After I finished the first story in this collection I realized I had two choices for reading further. I could either pause after each story and let it breathe and bloom on its own. Or, I could read the full collection at once without stopping to think. I chose the latter. The benefi...

    3.5 ? Have you ever picked up a book because of its cover, borrowed it, read it, not understood what you just read, but still feel like you really enjoyed it? That?s me with Wild Milk, a slim collection of stories by Sabrina Orah Mark. The first story, also titled ?Wild Milk?...

    This book was like nothing I expected. Upon first reading, I felt confused, then anxious, then, as I began to understand the form and function of the book, I began to fall in love. For me, poetry has always been hard to understand, so I usually end up googling "what does ____ mean?" so...

    Have you ever finished a book and thought......... what did I just read???? That is Wild Milk. It is utterly strange and beautiful and unique. Wild Milk is like a collection of strange fairy tales where nothing quite makes sense but the feeling that it evokes nullify the need for...

    [4.5/5] Thanks, insomnia, for giving me a chance to take this in in one sitting. There are some short-form stunners in Wild Milk, little stories and turns of phrase that reminded me of Leonora Carrington by way of Donald Barthelme. Each story gives way to its own surrealist dream logic...

  • Amanda Lagerfeld
    Apr 10, 2019

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

    I liked the fun-house mirror quality of this book--in its content, but also in the poetics of the prose. The images and words tend to loop back in strange, exciting ways. The stories are thoughtful and quirky (in a Donald Barthelme sort of way), but usually have a sudden deepening that...

    The language here is the precise and masterful language of a poet. The tone is honest and unassuming. These are satisfying, startling, funny, sometimes gut wrenching short stories written by a poet. The stories and observations are both unique/surreal and extremely relatable. ...

    A super smart book of dreamlike spiels, each with its own internal logic just beyond our collective ken. ...

    One of the most original collections published this year. Lovers of the surreal, short shorts, and hybrid forms should pick this up today. ...

    Were there repetitions? (view spoiler)[Yes, there were repetitions. (hide spoiler)] Were the repetitions sometimes overly cute? (view spoiler)[Yes, the repetitions were sometimes overly cute. (hide spoiler)] Did we mind? (view spoiler)[Yes, we sometimes minded, but we ...

    I need to read these all again to provide a proper review, but this is more than a collection of short stories. This is a world unlike any other where every sentence is unexpected and shining with love, fear, confusion, bewilderment, uncertainty, and more. Some of these three page fabl...

    What a completely wonderful read! Sabrina Orah Mark's poetic sensibilities are wound into genre-bending pieces that I can't recommend enough. This book is a happy balm (but mostly it's a book). ...

    After I finished the first story in this collection I realized I had two choices for reading further. I could either pause after each story and let it breathe and bloom on its own. Or, I could read the full collection at once without stopping to think. I chose the latter. The benefi...

    3.5 ? Have you ever picked up a book because of its cover, borrowed it, read it, not understood what you just read, but still feel like you really enjoyed it? That?s me with Wild Milk, a slim collection of stories by Sabrina Orah Mark. The first story, also titled ?Wild Milk?...

    This book was like nothing I expected. Upon first reading, I felt confused, then anxious, then, as I began to understand the form and function of the book, I began to fall in love. For me, poetry has always been hard to understand, so I usually end up googling "what does ____ mean?" so...

    Have you ever finished a book and thought......... what did I just read???? That is Wild Milk. It is utterly strange and beautiful and unique. Wild Milk is like a collection of strange fairy tales where nothing quite makes sense but the feeling that it evokes nullify the need for...

  • Jan Stinchcomb
    Oct 18, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

    I liked the fun-house mirror quality of this book--in its content, but also in the poetics of the prose. The images and words tend to loop back in strange, exciting ways. The stories are thoughtful and quirky (in a Donald Barthelme sort of way), but usually have a sudden deepening that...

    The language here is the precise and masterful language of a poet. The tone is honest and unassuming. These are satisfying, startling, funny, sometimes gut wrenching short stories written by a poet. The stories and observations are both unique/surreal and extremely relatable. ...

    A super smart book of dreamlike spiels, each with its own internal logic just beyond our collective ken. ...

    One of the most original collections published this year. Lovers of the surreal, short shorts, and hybrid forms should pick this up today. ...

  • Ben Niespodziany
    Oct 17, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

    I liked the fun-house mirror quality of this book--in its content, but also in the poetics of the prose. The images and words tend to loop back in strange, exciting ways. The stories are thoughtful and quirky (in a Donald Barthelme sort of way), but usually have a sudden deepening that...

    The language here is the precise and masterful language of a poet. The tone is honest and unassuming. These are satisfying, startling, funny, sometimes gut wrenching short stories written by a poet. The stories and observations are both unique/surreal and extremely relatable. ...

    A super smart book of dreamlike spiels, each with its own internal logic just beyond our collective ken. ...

    One of the most original collections published this year. Lovers of the surreal, short shorts, and hybrid forms should pick this up today. ...

    Were there repetitions? (view spoiler)[Yes, there were repetitions. (hide spoiler)] Were the repetitions sometimes overly cute? (view spoiler)[Yes, the repetitions were sometimes overly cute. (hide spoiler)] Did we mind? (view spoiler)[Yes, we sometimes minded, but we ...

    I need to read these all again to provide a proper review, but this is more than a collection of short stories. This is a world unlike any other where every sentence is unexpected and shining with love, fear, confusion, bewilderment, uncertainty, and more. Some of these three page fabl...

  • Charlie Kruse
    Feb 10, 2019

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

  • Tara
    Mar 30, 2019

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

    I liked the fun-house mirror quality of this book--in its content, but also in the poetics of the prose. The images and words tend to loop back in strange, exciting ways. The stories are thoughtful and quirky (in a Donald Barthelme sort of way), but usually have a sudden deepening that...

    The language here is the precise and masterful language of a poet. The tone is honest and unassuming. These are satisfying, startling, funny, sometimes gut wrenching short stories written by a poet. The stories and observations are both unique/surreal and extremely relatable. ...

    A super smart book of dreamlike spiels, each with its own internal logic just beyond our collective ken. ...

    One of the most original collections published this year. Lovers of the surreal, short shorts, and hybrid forms should pick this up today. ...

    Were there repetitions? (view spoiler)[Yes, there were repetitions. (hide spoiler)] Were the repetitions sometimes overly cute? (view spoiler)[Yes, the repetitions were sometimes overly cute. (hide spoiler)] Did we mind? (view spoiler)[Yes, we sometimes minded, but we ...

    I need to read these all again to provide a proper review, but this is more than a collection of short stories. This is a world unlike any other where every sentence is unexpected and shining with love, fear, confusion, bewilderment, uncertainty, and more. Some of these three page fabl...

    What a completely wonderful read! Sabrina Orah Mark's poetic sensibilities are wound into genre-bending pieces that I can't recommend enough. This book is a happy balm (but mostly it's a book). ...

    After I finished the first story in this collection I realized I had two choices for reading further. I could either pause after each story and let it breathe and bloom on its own. Or, I could read the full collection at once without stopping to think. I chose the latter. The benefi...

  • Barbette
    Aug 06, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

  • Cayley
    Nov 26, 2018

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's short stories in WILD MILK are dreamy, edgy, and dangerous. Most of us grew up with fairy tales, but Mark transforms these traditional storytelling models into modern day confessions with moxie. ...

    Lucky for me a funny and strange book found me: Sabrina Orah Mark?s Wild Milk, a collection of 24 very short stories published by Dorothy Project. Mark?s stories follow a dream logic and explore familial relationships and domesticity. In these stories a mother has 9 sons who sudden...

    Sabrina Orah Mark's WILD MILK is a far out ride. "Mother at the Dentist" is now one of my favorite short stories, even though it is way more Dora Carrington than Elizabeth Stroud. The timing, rhythm, and nuance of it delight me to no end. And there are family issues lurking all over th...

    What the fuck did I just read ? ...

    This title joined my tbr list when I read one of its components, "The Very Nervous Family," last summer. Interestingly, that piece was published by Poetry magazine. And categories prove elusive as one reads this inventive collection. I suspect that the words "experimental" and "fabulis...

    This might grow on me. Definitely loved a few stories here and there, would use for teaching purposes. As a collection, it?s a little lost on me for the time being. I understand the intersection between strange and tender, but am having a hard time genuinely assigning and accepting w...

    Touches of Don Barthelme and Diane Williams in these stories, mostly about family dynamics but in an absurd, dream-touched world ...

    Surreal. I'm not sure I devoted enough attention to each story. Lots of fun lines. ...

    I liked the fun-house mirror quality of this book--in its content, but also in the poetics of the prose. The images and words tend to loop back in strange, exciting ways. The stories are thoughtful and quirky (in a Donald Barthelme sort of way), but usually have a sudden deepening that...

    The language here is the precise and masterful language of a poet. The tone is honest and unassuming. These are satisfying, startling, funny, sometimes gut wrenching short stories written by a poet. The stories and observations are both unique/surreal and extremely relatable. ...

    A super smart book of dreamlike spiels, each with its own internal logic just beyond our collective ken. ...

    One of the most original collections published this year. Lovers of the surreal, short shorts, and hybrid forms should pick this up today. ...

    Were there repetitions? (view spoiler)[Yes, there were repetitions. (hide spoiler)] Were the repetitions sometimes overly cute? (view spoiler)[Yes, the repetitions were sometimes overly cute. (hide spoiler)] Did we mind? (view spoiler)[Yes, we sometimes minded, but we ...

    I need to read these all again to provide a proper review, but this is more than a collection of short stories. This is a world unlike any other where every sentence is unexpected and shining with love, fear, confusion, bewilderment, uncertainty, and more. Some of these three page fabl...

    What a completely wonderful read! Sabrina Orah Mark's poetic sensibilities are wound into genre-bending pieces that I can't recommend enough. This book is a happy balm (but mostly it's a book). ...

    After I finished the first story in this collection I realized I had two choices for reading further. I could either pause after each story and let it breathe and bloom on its own. Or, I could read the full collection at once without stopping to think. I chose the latter. The benefi...

    3.5 ? Have you ever picked up a book because of its cover, borrowed it, read it, not understood what you just read, but still feel like you really enjoyed it? That?s me with Wild Milk, a slim collection of stories by Sabrina Orah Mark. The first story, also titled ?Wild Milk?...

    This book was like nothing I expected. Upon first reading, I felt confused, then anxious, then, as I began to understand the form and function of the book, I began to fall in love. For me, poetry has always been hard to understand, so I usually end up googling "what does ____ mean?" so...

  • Alyse Bensel
    Jan 06, 2019

    These are very dependent on me as a reader, my reading mindset. Each is finely constructed but I really need to meet them on their own terms with willing alertness or they don't really engage what they seem designed to. But when they do (when I'm the reader these deserve, perhaps), mag...

    Utterly strange and wonderfully ridiculous. These stories have a fairy tale quality and are sprinkled with odd mothers, forgetful lovers, cruel children, and confused protagonists. At times, they feel stuck in surreal dreams and at other times a sadness seeps into the anxiety of it all...

    George Saunders meets Leonora Carrington in a tripped-out Perrault fairy tale. Love. ...

    3.5 stars Extremely clever, frequently funny language play abounds in this little book. Part Kafka, part Diane Williams, part Henny Youngman, Mark takes ordinary situations, tosses in startling imagery, and then ratchets the whole thing up to absurd levels by focusing almost microsc...

    This collection is nuts. Almost like an alien, or a lonely computer trying to speak english, trying to make out of the ruins of a dying language. References are dropped with cultural context, stripping any word of its' semantic meaning. These stories are WEIRD, but so beautiful and so ...

    There are awesome pieces here, like "The Taxmen": When the taxmen came for Father's heart, Father is on the phone. I hear him say: "they're here." I hear him say, "keep the bones." Then there are pieces that don't do much for me. But the language is almost always clever, and the situa...

    I love these wry, gem-like short stories. I gobbled them up like so many chips, all in one afternoon, and am now rereading them more slowly, to savor what Mark does with words. These pieces are magical and funny, absurdist fairy tales. ...

    It is an absolutely delightful and unapologetically poetic collection of short stories or sometimes prose poems. A collection so desperately needed in these times; it has enough potency to make us realize that the soul of techno-modernization has not yet crushed the soul of absurdism a...

    As wildly language driven as ever. The stories themselves fold into phrases. The phrases turn into jokes, the jokes turn into sublime tragedies. Many stories about family and motherhood and so many other things. I love love Tsim Tsum and still think the short story might be the best fo...

    If you want biting, poignant, and wonderfully baffling short stories, many of which blur the line between poetry and prose, you've come to the right collection. Stories don't need linear time or expected narrative arc to succeed, and Sabrina Orah Mark proves this with characters seated...