Discourses and Selected Writings

Discourses and Selected Writings

A new translation of the influential teachings of the great Stoic philosopher DESPITE BEING BORN into slavery, Greco-Roman philosopher Epictetus became one of the most influential thinkers of his time. Discourses and Selected Writings is a transcribed collection of informal lectures given by the philosopher around AD 108. A gateway into the life and mind of a great intellec A new translation of the influential teachings of the great Stoic philosopher DESPITE BEING BORN into slavery, Gre...

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Title:Discourses and Selected Writings
Author:Epictetus
Rating:
Genres:Philosophy
ISBN:0140449469
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:276 pages pages

Discourses and Selected Writings Reviews

  • Delara Emami
    Jul 31, 2012

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

  • Jim Coughenour
    May 05, 2009

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

  • Henry Manampiring
    Jul 12, 2018

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

    A series of lectures on how to die. Epictetus offers his best practices for living a good life. The essentials outlined in the Enchiridion are expanded upon in Discourses. Central to his philosophy is the principle of control; that one should concern concern themselves only with tho...

    Definitely a good read. Further helping me understand the Stoic stance a bit more. One thing that I fail to come to terms with is the concept of gratefulness (that we normally advocate), with Stoic philosophy. The book for those unfamiliar advocates a distance from external things. Ext...

    I loved this book. My long term, low level fear of death has considerably abated. Epictetus was a slave who, when freed, started his own Stoic philosophy school in second century Nicopolis (ancient Greece I think). This book, his sayings and lectures recorded by one of his students...

    Humbly, I can?t review a 2,000-year-old book of the great philosophers as if it?s just an ordinary read. I?ve learned a lot and Remembered how good it feels to read simple yet complicated truths again. Along with Marcus Aurelius, this book is another step in my journey through ...

    Discourses and Selected Writings is a wonderful manual on how to live a life of virtue and stoicism. Considering that Epictetus lived almost two thousand years ago?much of what he says still stands true. It's truly a blessing to be able to read his work. I recommend this book to anyb...

    If I were to give advice on how to read the book, start with the Enchiridion - Snippets and summaries of Stoic teaching. Then move to the Fragments. Finally, take on the Discourses - This is the ?heavier? part of the book and the most difficult for me to get my arms around. That sa...

    Epictetus was a Roman slave and philosopher who later became the teacher of Marcus Aurelius. I read his Manual for Living last year. This has a lot more in it, but it's pretty dry stuff. On the plus side, there is a lot of stoic philosophy here. Focus only on the things you can control...

    Without a doubt, 5 stars. The more complete treatise on Stoicism, this record of Epictetus writings is absolute joy and inspiration. Once you read it, you wouldn't believe it was written 2000 years ago, because it is still so relevant with today's situation. Most recommended for ...

  • Bruce
    Jul 11, 2009

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

  • Ektoras (Ross)
    Oct 30, 2018

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

  • Fatima
    Jun 12, 2016

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

  • Justin
    Feb 09, 2019

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

    A series of lectures on how to die. Epictetus offers his best practices for living a good life. The essentials outlined in the Enchiridion are expanded upon in Discourses. Central to his philosophy is the principle of control; that one should concern concern themselves only with tho...

  • Birau Catalin
    Nov 18, 2018

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

  • Brady
    Mar 12, 2018

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

  • Sammy
    Jan 02, 2019

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

    A series of lectures on how to die. Epictetus offers his best practices for living a good life. The essentials outlined in the Enchiridion are expanded upon in Discourses. Central to his philosophy is the principle of control; that one should concern concern themselves only with tho...

    Definitely a good read. Further helping me understand the Stoic stance a bit more. One thing that I fail to come to terms with is the concept of gratefulness (that we normally advocate), with Stoic philosophy. The book for those unfamiliar advocates a distance from external things. Ext...

    I loved this book. My long term, low level fear of death has considerably abated. Epictetus was a slave who, when freed, started his own Stoic philosophy school in second century Nicopolis (ancient Greece I think). This book, his sayings and lectures recorded by one of his students...

  • Blair
    Dec 01, 2013

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

  • Marcus Backman
    Jun 08, 2019

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

  • Erik Golbiw
    Feb 26, 2018

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

    A series of lectures on how to die. Epictetus offers his best practices for living a good life. The essentials outlined in the Enchiridion are expanded upon in Discourses. Central to his philosophy is the principle of control; that one should concern concern themselves only with tho...

    Definitely a good read. Further helping me understand the Stoic stance a bit more. One thing that I fail to come to terms with is the concept of gratefulness (that we normally advocate), with Stoic philosophy. The book for those unfamiliar advocates a distance from external things. Ext...

    I loved this book. My long term, low level fear of death has considerably abated. Epictetus was a slave who, when freed, started his own Stoic philosophy school in second century Nicopolis (ancient Greece I think). This book, his sayings and lectures recorded by one of his students...

    Humbly, I can?t review a 2,000-year-old book of the great philosophers as if it?s just an ordinary read. I?ve learned a lot and Remembered how good it feels to read simple yet complicated truths again. Along with Marcus Aurelius, this book is another step in my journey through ...

    Discourses and Selected Writings is a wonderful manual on how to live a life of virtue and stoicism. Considering that Epictetus lived almost two thousand years ago?much of what he says still stands true. It's truly a blessing to be able to read his work. I recommend this book to anyb...

    If I were to give advice on how to read the book, start with the Enchiridion - Snippets and summaries of Stoic teaching. Then move to the Fragments. Finally, take on the Discourses - This is the ?heavier? part of the book and the most difficult for me to get my arms around. That sa...

  • Héctor Amaya
    Nov 13, 2018

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

    A series of lectures on how to die. Epictetus offers his best practices for living a good life. The essentials outlined in the Enchiridion are expanded upon in Discourses. Central to his philosophy is the principle of control; that one should concern concern themselves only with tho...

    Definitely a good read. Further helping me understand the Stoic stance a bit more. One thing that I fail to come to terms with is the concept of gratefulness (that we normally advocate), with Stoic philosophy. The book for those unfamiliar advocates a distance from external things. Ext...

    I loved this book. My long term, low level fear of death has considerably abated. Epictetus was a slave who, when freed, started his own Stoic philosophy school in second century Nicopolis (ancient Greece I think). This book, his sayings and lectures recorded by one of his students...

    Humbly, I can?t review a 2,000-year-old book of the great philosophers as if it?s just an ordinary read. I?ve learned a lot and Remembered how good it feels to read simple yet complicated truths again. Along with Marcus Aurelius, this book is another step in my journey through ...

    Discourses and Selected Writings is a wonderful manual on how to live a life of virtue and stoicism. Considering that Epictetus lived almost two thousand years ago?much of what he says still stands true. It's truly a blessing to be able to read his work. I recommend this book to anyb...

    If I were to give advice on how to read the book, start with the Enchiridion - Snippets and summaries of Stoic teaching. Then move to the Fragments. Finally, take on the Discourses - This is the ?heavier? part of the book and the most difficult for me to get my arms around. That sa...

    Epictetus was a Roman slave and philosopher who later became the teacher of Marcus Aurelius. I read his Manual for Living last year. This has a lot more in it, but it's pretty dry stuff. On the plus side, there is a lot of stoic philosophy here. Focus only on the things you can control...

    Without a doubt, 5 stars. The more complete treatise on Stoicism, this record of Epictetus writings is absolute joy and inspiration. Once you read it, you wouldn't believe it was written 2000 years ago, because it is still so relevant with today's situation. Most recommended for ...

    The philosophy in itself is both timely and timeless. A little disappointed by Penguin edition's translation; feels less accurate than other editions. ...

    a great translation for a great book excellent and very readable translation of this Stoic work. as always, the bigger difficulty is in attempting to live it out. ...

  • Maciej Sitko
    Mar 08, 2019

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

  • Christian Solorzano
    May 31, 2018

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

    A series of lectures on how to die. Epictetus offers his best practices for living a good life. The essentials outlined in the Enchiridion are expanded upon in Discourses. Central to his philosophy is the principle of control; that one should concern concern themselves only with tho...

    Definitely a good read. Further helping me understand the Stoic stance a bit more. One thing that I fail to come to terms with is the concept of gratefulness (that we normally advocate), with Stoic philosophy. The book for those unfamiliar advocates a distance from external things. Ext...

    I loved this book. My long term, low level fear of death has considerably abated. Epictetus was a slave who, when freed, started his own Stoic philosophy school in second century Nicopolis (ancient Greece I think). This book, his sayings and lectures recorded by one of his students...

    Humbly, I can?t review a 2,000-year-old book of the great philosophers as if it?s just an ordinary read. I?ve learned a lot and Remembered how good it feels to read simple yet complicated truths again. Along with Marcus Aurelius, this book is another step in my journey through ...

    Discourses and Selected Writings is a wonderful manual on how to live a life of virtue and stoicism. Considering that Epictetus lived almost two thousand years ago?much of what he says still stands true. It's truly a blessing to be able to read his work. I recommend this book to anyb...

  • Neeraj Shukla
    Nov 18, 2016

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

  • Zachary Rudolph
    May 13, 2017

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

  • Goce Cvetanov
    Jul 28, 2019

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

  • William2
    Sep 14, 2016

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

  • Connor Whittle
    Feb 13, 2018

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

  • Mattheus Guttenberg
    Aug 19, 2019

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

    A series of lectures on how to die. Epictetus offers his best practices for living a good life. The essentials outlined in the Enchiridion are expanded upon in Discourses. Central to his philosophy is the principle of control; that one should concern concern themselves only with tho...

    Definitely a good read. Further helping me understand the Stoic stance a bit more. One thing that I fail to come to terms with is the concept of gratefulness (that we normally advocate), with Stoic philosophy. The book for those unfamiliar advocates a distance from external things. Ext...

    I loved this book. My long term, low level fear of death has considerably abated. Epictetus was a slave who, when freed, started his own Stoic philosophy school in second century Nicopolis (ancient Greece I think). This book, his sayings and lectures recorded by one of his students...

    Humbly, I can?t review a 2,000-year-old book of the great philosophers as if it?s just an ordinary read. I?ve learned a lot and Remembered how good it feels to read simple yet complicated truths again. Along with Marcus Aurelius, this book is another step in my journey through ...

    Discourses and Selected Writings is a wonderful manual on how to live a life of virtue and stoicism. Considering that Epictetus lived almost two thousand years ago?much of what he says still stands true. It's truly a blessing to be able to read his work. I recommend this book to anyb...

    If I were to give advice on how to read the book, start with the Enchiridion - Snippets and summaries of Stoic teaching. Then move to the Fragments. Finally, take on the Discourses - This is the ?heavier? part of the book and the most difficult for me to get my arms around. That sa...

    Epictetus was a Roman slave and philosopher who later became the teacher of Marcus Aurelius. I read his Manual for Living last year. This has a lot more in it, but it's pretty dry stuff. On the plus side, there is a lot of stoic philosophy here. Focus only on the things you can control...

    Without a doubt, 5 stars. The more complete treatise on Stoicism, this record of Epictetus writings is absolute joy and inspiration. Once you read it, you wouldn't believe it was written 2000 years ago, because it is still so relevant with today's situation. Most recommended for ...

    The philosophy in itself is both timely and timeless. A little disappointed by Penguin edition's translation; feels less accurate than other editions. ...

    a great translation for a great book excellent and very readable translation of this Stoic work. as always, the bigger difficulty is in attempting to live it out. ...

    In some ways, it is difficult to give a negative review to a book such as this one, which has a significant place in intellectual history. In other, more pressing ways, it is not. The main positions advocated are a distinction between 'soul' and body, and the opposition of things un...

    Epictetus was the premier Stoic philosopher of his day and his writings are some of the few Stoic texts from antiquity to survive and thrive into modern times. His teachings are collected here from his student Arrian during his public lectures where he addresses his students and other ...

  • Alex
    Aug 28, 2017

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

  • Xander
    Sep 09, 2019

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

  • Elena Mansour
    Jun 12, 2019

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

    A series of lectures on how to die. Epictetus offers his best practices for living a good life. The essentials outlined in the Enchiridion are expanded upon in Discourses. Central to his philosophy is the principle of control; that one should concern concern themselves only with tho...

    Definitely a good read. Further helping me understand the Stoic stance a bit more. One thing that I fail to come to terms with is the concept of gratefulness (that we normally advocate), with Stoic philosophy. The book for those unfamiliar advocates a distance from external things. Ext...

    I loved this book. My long term, low level fear of death has considerably abated. Epictetus was a slave who, when freed, started his own Stoic philosophy school in second century Nicopolis (ancient Greece I think). This book, his sayings and lectures recorded by one of his students...

    Humbly, I can?t review a 2,000-year-old book of the great philosophers as if it?s just an ordinary read. I?ve learned a lot and Remembered how good it feels to read simple yet complicated truths again. Along with Marcus Aurelius, this book is another step in my journey through ...

    Discourses and Selected Writings is a wonderful manual on how to live a life of virtue and stoicism. Considering that Epictetus lived almost two thousand years ago?much of what he says still stands true. It's truly a blessing to be able to read his work. I recommend this book to anyb...

    If I were to give advice on how to read the book, start with the Enchiridion - Snippets and summaries of Stoic teaching. Then move to the Fragments. Finally, take on the Discourses - This is the ?heavier? part of the book and the most difficult for me to get my arms around. That sa...

    Epictetus was a Roman slave and philosopher who later became the teacher of Marcus Aurelius. I read his Manual for Living last year. This has a lot more in it, but it's pretty dry stuff. On the plus side, there is a lot of stoic philosophy here. Focus only on the things you can control...

    Without a doubt, 5 stars. The more complete treatise on Stoicism, this record of Epictetus writings is absolute joy and inspiration. Once you read it, you wouldn't believe it was written 2000 years ago, because it is still so relevant with today's situation. Most recommended for ...

    The philosophy in itself is both timely and timeless. A little disappointed by Penguin edition's translation; feels less accurate than other editions. ...

  • Castles
    Jan 13, 2019

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

    A series of lectures on how to die. Epictetus offers his best practices for living a good life. The essentials outlined in the Enchiridion are expanded upon in Discourses. Central to his philosophy is the principle of control; that one should concern concern themselves only with tho...

    Definitely a good read. Further helping me understand the Stoic stance a bit more. One thing that I fail to come to terms with is the concept of gratefulness (that we normally advocate), with Stoic philosophy. The book for those unfamiliar advocates a distance from external things. Ext...

    I loved this book. My long term, low level fear of death has considerably abated. Epictetus was a slave who, when freed, started his own Stoic philosophy school in second century Nicopolis (ancient Greece I think). This book, his sayings and lectures recorded by one of his students...

    Humbly, I can?t review a 2,000-year-old book of the great philosophers as if it?s just an ordinary read. I?ve learned a lot and Remembered how good it feels to read simple yet complicated truths again. Along with Marcus Aurelius, this book is another step in my journey through ...

  • Shane Orr
    Oct 17, 2017

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

    A series of lectures on how to die. Epictetus offers his best practices for living a good life. The essentials outlined in the Enchiridion are expanded upon in Discourses. Central to his philosophy is the principle of control; that one should concern concern themselves only with tho...

    Definitely a good read. Further helping me understand the Stoic stance a bit more. One thing that I fail to come to terms with is the concept of gratefulness (that we normally advocate), with Stoic philosophy. The book for those unfamiliar advocates a distance from external things. Ext...

    I loved this book. My long term, low level fear of death has considerably abated. Epictetus was a slave who, when freed, started his own Stoic philosophy school in second century Nicopolis (ancient Greece I think). This book, his sayings and lectures recorded by one of his students...

    Humbly, I can?t review a 2,000-year-old book of the great philosophers as if it?s just an ordinary read. I?ve learned a lot and Remembered how good it feels to read simple yet complicated truths again. Along with Marcus Aurelius, this book is another step in my journey through ...

    Discourses and Selected Writings is a wonderful manual on how to live a life of virtue and stoicism. Considering that Epictetus lived almost two thousand years ago?much of what he says still stands true. It's truly a blessing to be able to read his work. I recommend this book to anyb...

    If I were to give advice on how to read the book, start with the Enchiridion - Snippets and summaries of Stoic teaching. Then move to the Fragments. Finally, take on the Discourses - This is the ?heavier? part of the book and the most difficult for me to get my arms around. That sa...

    Epictetus was a Roman slave and philosopher who later became the teacher of Marcus Aurelius. I read his Manual for Living last year. This has a lot more in it, but it's pretty dry stuff. On the plus side, there is a lot of stoic philosophy here. Focus only on the things you can control...

  • Adam
    Jun 21, 2018

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

  • Asaad Mahmood
    Jun 30, 2018

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

    A series of lectures on how to die. Epictetus offers his best practices for living a good life. The essentials outlined in the Enchiridion are expanded upon in Discourses. Central to his philosophy is the principle of control; that one should concern concern themselves only with tho...

    Definitely a good read. Further helping me understand the Stoic stance a bit more. One thing that I fail to come to terms with is the concept of gratefulness (that we normally advocate), with Stoic philosophy. The book for those unfamiliar advocates a distance from external things. Ext...

  • Mark Reece
    Sep 09, 2019

    In this rereading of Epictetus? Discourses, I wanted to concentrate on two things in particular: first, whether his belief in God or the gods (and Epictetus is by far the most overtly religious and theistic of the Greco-Roman moralists) is strictly necessary to his philosophy; and, s...

    Read The Enchiridion. Breezy Stoic tonics for daily living. Surprisingly Buddhistic. Star rating refers to that section only. ...

    I gave Marcus Aurelius' Mediations a five star rating only because the writing was more clear. However Aurelius was inspired by Epictetus and that is why I chose to read this book. I really enjoyed the read. It had a very powerful effect on the way I viewed life. If you are seeking to ...

    The most useful book I have ever read, back when philosophy really meant 'love of wisdom'. For you will learn by experience that it's true: the things that men admire and work so hard to get prove useless to them once they're theirs. Meanwhile, people to whom such things are still d...

    I just read Epictetus with a small group and was surprised how much I enjoyed it. In my totally dilettantish opinion, after only 1 reading ? I found the Discourses rambling and repetitive, and Epictetus too much of a scold ? but with interruptions of actual genius. On the other han...

    Me: Epictetus, why is life so difficult? Why can?t I get what I want? Why are people so immature? Why can I never seem to be satisfied? Epictetus: Because you are a damned fool! *smacks you over the head with his cane.* Seek virtue within not in external things! There will you fin...

    A classic of Stoic philosophy. A self-help book before there were self-help books. Some great stuff, although it's a bit repetitive, which will be largely due to its origins in lecture notes by a devoted pupil. ...

    Epictetus's stoicism in a nutshell-list: 1) You are in control of/responsible for your judgement, impulse, desire, aversion and mental faculties. The virtuous person knows they have power over these things and can practice discernment in how they perceive and take on the world throu...

    A difficult but powerful perspective to be found here; what this book seems to promise is the secret to invincibility. But it's not what most people at first thought would expect or even for that matter want. Out the window go the traditional definitions of evil. Suffering is thought ...

    This being the first time I've read an entire book dedicated to the teachings of a single philosopher makes me unqualified, and therefore incapable of assessing and coming to a fair conjecture of the teachings. That's why my review will focus on the writing and more importantly, my...

    Thoughts on life and philosophy behind things. A good read. Might take a long time to digest the wisdom contained in this book. In fact the prime teaching of the book is that, it is not good to be knowledgeable about things in life, but to develop a consistent ability to practice...

    A prominent figure among the Stoic school of thought, Epictetus deals with several subjects such as the correct use of impressions, desire and aversion, the importance of logic in governing one's own life, and many others. The most important one among all is making "the best use of wha...

    ?I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains ? but moaning and groaning too? ... I have to die. If it is now, well then I die now; if later, then now I will take my lunch, since the hour for lunch has arrived ? and dying I will tend to later.? ...

    The Discourses (and fragments) is in one of the three must-reads on Stoicism, along with Seneca's Letters from a Stoic and Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I'm not a huge fan of the the Enchiridion, however. The Enchiridion has a lot about what a Stoic should act like, but nothing on how ...

    Did not particularly find meaning in the Discourses themselves, as they seemed too broad and sometimes really centered around society and the people as they were in the time of writing. The Enchiridion was on point though. ...

    Awesome. Clear ideas and sound logic. Almost as pleasurable to read as his student, Marcus Aurelius ...

    After finishing Aristotle, I decided to delve into Hellenistic philosophy. During the second and first centuries B.C. Greek philosophy was divided into three main currents: (1) the Sceptics (Plato's Academy turned doubtful about the possibility of any knowledge); (2) Epicureanism (who ...

    "Lead me, Zeus, and you too, Destiny, To wherever your decrees have assigned me. I follow readily, but if I choose not, Wretched though I am, I must follow still. Fate guides the willing, but drags the unwilling." Epictetus is one of the great three along with Marcus Aurelius an...

    A series of lectures on how to die. Epictetus offers his best practices for living a good life. The essentials outlined in the Enchiridion are expanded upon in Discourses. Central to his philosophy is the principle of control; that one should concern concern themselves only with tho...

    Definitely a good read. Further helping me understand the Stoic stance a bit more. One thing that I fail to come to terms with is the concept of gratefulness (that we normally advocate), with Stoic philosophy. The book for those unfamiliar advocates a distance from external things. Ext...

    I loved this book. My long term, low level fear of death has considerably abated. Epictetus was a slave who, when freed, started his own Stoic philosophy school in second century Nicopolis (ancient Greece I think). This book, his sayings and lectures recorded by one of his students...

    Humbly, I can?t review a 2,000-year-old book of the great philosophers as if it?s just an ordinary read. I?ve learned a lot and Remembered how good it feels to read simple yet complicated truths again. Along with Marcus Aurelius, this book is another step in my journey through ...

    Discourses and Selected Writings is a wonderful manual on how to live a life of virtue and stoicism. Considering that Epictetus lived almost two thousand years ago?much of what he says still stands true. It's truly a blessing to be able to read his work. I recommend this book to anyb...

    If I were to give advice on how to read the book, start with the Enchiridion - Snippets and summaries of Stoic teaching. Then move to the Fragments. Finally, take on the Discourses - This is the ?heavier? part of the book and the most difficult for me to get my arms around. That sa...

    Epictetus was a Roman slave and philosopher who later became the teacher of Marcus Aurelius. I read his Manual for Living last year. This has a lot more in it, but it's pretty dry stuff. On the plus side, there is a lot of stoic philosophy here. Focus only on the things you can control...

    Without a doubt, 5 stars. The more complete treatise on Stoicism, this record of Epictetus writings is absolute joy and inspiration. Once you read it, you wouldn't believe it was written 2000 years ago, because it is still so relevant with today's situation. Most recommended for ...

    The philosophy in itself is both timely and timeless. A little disappointed by Penguin edition's translation; feels less accurate than other editions. ...

    a great translation for a great book excellent and very readable translation of this Stoic work. as always, the bigger difficulty is in attempting to live it out. ...

    In some ways, it is difficult to give a negative review to a book such as this one, which has a significant place in intellectual history. In other, more pressing ways, it is not. The main positions advocated are a distinction between 'soul' and body, and the opposition of things un...