The Art of Choosing

The Art of Choosing

Every day we make choices. Coke or Pepsi? Save or spend? Stay or go? Whether mundane or life-altering, these choices define us and shape our lives. Sheena Iyengar asks the difficult questions about how and why we choose: Is the desire for choice innate or bound by culture? Why do we sometimes choose against our best interests? How much control do we really have over what we Every day we make choices. Coke or Pepsi? Save or spend? Stay or go? Whether mundane or life-altering, these c...

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Title:The Art of Choosing
Author:Sheena Iyengar
Rating:
Genres:Psychology
ISBN:How We Choose: The Subtext of Life
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:329 pages pages

The Art of Choosing Reviews

  • Hubert
    Aug 21, 2011

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

  • Trish
    Mar 03, 2010

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

  • HBalikov
    Apr 20, 2010

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

  • Christina
    Jun 28, 2010

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

    A lot of studies have been mentioned in the book, there are lot of interesting psychological experiments referenced to support the point the author is trying to make. That way this book is really nice collection, summary of studies and experiments about choice and various aspects of it...

    I might have learned more from this book if I had read it closer to its publication date, but by now I had already read about almost all the studies the author mentions in other places. I think a better title for this book would be A Discussion on Choice. You aren't going to get any pr...

    Crazy spoiler for Sophie's Choice though ...

    Definitely raised some interesting points. I can definitely pick up some important tips and use them to become less obsessive about making the right choice. Anyway... I will have to give it a second read... ...

    I'm not so crazy about this book. I feel its reach exceeds its grasp. First I thought it was the pop-science genre in general, but when I picked up Brian Christian's Most Human Human I couldn't put it down. In comparison The Art of Choosing is sluggish, and sometimes a little out of l...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is written in the psychology/sociology arena similar to the Malcolm Gladwell style. There were some very interesting studies presented that give the reader insight into the decision making though process. It also identifies cultural differences effecting ...

    This book generally talks about how we make decisions. 1. Our choices are determined by two opposing systems: the automatic and the reflective. Marshmallow experiment. Those who eat the marshmallow immediately- AUTOMATIC. Delayed Gratification- REFLECTIVE. Reflective system lin...

    Really interesting look at all kinds of choices and how we view choice in our lives. The nursing home studies were interesting (residents given choices, even very unimportant ones, were less likely to die and happier), as were some of the others. In one, Indian arranged marriages were ...

  • Annie
    Nov 09, 2013

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

    A lot of studies have been mentioned in the book, there are lot of interesting psychological experiments referenced to support the point the author is trying to make. That way this book is really nice collection, summary of studies and experiments about choice and various aspects of it...

    I might have learned more from this book if I had read it closer to its publication date, but by now I had already read about almost all the studies the author mentions in other places. I think a better title for this book would be A Discussion on Choice. You aren't going to get any pr...

    Crazy spoiler for Sophie's Choice though ...

    Definitely raised some interesting points. I can definitely pick up some important tips and use them to become less obsessive about making the right choice. Anyway... I will have to give it a second read... ...

    I'm not so crazy about this book. I feel its reach exceeds its grasp. First I thought it was the pop-science genre in general, but when I picked up Brian Christian's Most Human Human I couldn't put it down. In comparison The Art of Choosing is sluggish, and sometimes a little out of l...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is written in the psychology/sociology arena similar to the Malcolm Gladwell style. There were some very interesting studies presented that give the reader insight into the decision making though process. It also identifies cultural differences effecting ...

  • Karen
    Jun 05, 2011

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

    A lot of studies have been mentioned in the book, there are lot of interesting psychological experiments referenced to support the point the author is trying to make. That way this book is really nice collection, summary of studies and experiments about choice and various aspects of it...

    I might have learned more from this book if I had read it closer to its publication date, but by now I had already read about almost all the studies the author mentions in other places. I think a better title for this book would be A Discussion on Choice. You aren't going to get any pr...

    Crazy spoiler for Sophie's Choice though ...

    Definitely raised some interesting points. I can definitely pick up some important tips and use them to become less obsessive about making the right choice. Anyway... I will have to give it a second read... ...

    I'm not so crazy about this book. I feel its reach exceeds its grasp. First I thought it was the pop-science genre in general, but when I picked up Brian Christian's Most Human Human I couldn't put it down. In comparison The Art of Choosing is sluggish, and sometimes a little out of l...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is written in the psychology/sociology arena similar to the Malcolm Gladwell style. There were some very interesting studies presented that give the reader insight into the decision making though process. It also identifies cultural differences effecting ...

    This book generally talks about how we make decisions. 1. Our choices are determined by two opposing systems: the automatic and the reflective. Marshmallow experiment. Those who eat the marshmallow immediately- AUTOMATIC. Delayed Gratification- REFLECTIVE. Reflective system lin...

    Really interesting look at all kinds of choices and how we view choice in our lives. The nursing home studies were interesting (residents given choices, even very unimportant ones, were less likely to die and happier), as were some of the others. In one, Indian arranged marriages were ...

    Decision Making - what delicious fun and dreadful conundrums! Salesmen and teachers have always known that presentation matters, but Iyengar reveals just how much and why! In this exceedingly eclectic and very readable book, Iyengar discusses the tension between our automatic and refle...

  • Mary
    Jun 22, 2012

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

  • Andrew
    Apr 28, 2010

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

  • Josh
    Jul 17, 2011

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

    A lot of studies have been mentioned in the book, there are lot of interesting psychological experiments referenced to support the point the author is trying to make. That way this book is really nice collection, summary of studies and experiments about choice and various aspects of it...

    I might have learned more from this book if I had read it closer to its publication date, but by now I had already read about almost all the studies the author mentions in other places. I think a better title for this book would be A Discussion on Choice. You aren't going to get any pr...

    Crazy spoiler for Sophie's Choice though ...

    Definitely raised some interesting points. I can definitely pick up some important tips and use them to become less obsessive about making the right choice. Anyway... I will have to give it a second read... ...

    I'm not so crazy about this book. I feel its reach exceeds its grasp. First I thought it was the pop-science genre in general, but when I picked up Brian Christian's Most Human Human I couldn't put it down. In comparison The Art of Choosing is sluggish, and sometimes a little out of l...

  • Trish
    Apr 01, 2010

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

  • Jennifer
    May 12, 2011

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

  • Charlotte
    Mar 16, 2010

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

  • Drani
    Jan 10, 2011

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

  • Diane S ☔
    Apr 25, 2011

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

  • Devika
    Jul 02, 2017

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

    A lot of studies have been mentioned in the book, there are lot of interesting psychological experiments referenced to support the point the author is trying to make. That way this book is really nice collection, summary of studies and experiments about choice and various aspects of it...

    I might have learned more from this book if I had read it closer to its publication date, but by now I had already read about almost all the studies the author mentions in other places. I think a better title for this book would be A Discussion on Choice. You aren't going to get any pr...

    Crazy spoiler for Sophie's Choice though ...

    Definitely raised some interesting points. I can definitely pick up some important tips and use them to become less obsessive about making the right choice. Anyway... I will have to give it a second read... ...

    I'm not so crazy about this book. I feel its reach exceeds its grasp. First I thought it was the pop-science genre in general, but when I picked up Brian Christian's Most Human Human I couldn't put it down. In comparison The Art of Choosing is sluggish, and sometimes a little out of l...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is written in the psychology/sociology arena similar to the Malcolm Gladwell style. There were some very interesting studies presented that give the reader insight into the decision making though process. It also identifies cultural differences effecting ...

    This book generally talks about how we make decisions. 1. Our choices are determined by two opposing systems: the automatic and the reflective. Marshmallow experiment. Those who eat the marshmallow immediately- AUTOMATIC. Delayed Gratification- REFLECTIVE. Reflective system lin...

    Really interesting look at all kinds of choices and how we view choice in our lives. The nursing home studies were interesting (residents given choices, even very unimportant ones, were less likely to die and happier), as were some of the others. In one, Indian arranged marriages were ...

    Decision Making - what delicious fun and dreadful conundrums! Salesmen and teachers have always known that presentation matters, but Iyengar reveals just how much and why! In this exceedingly eclectic and very readable book, Iyengar discusses the tension between our automatic and refle...

    Simply written, engaging and thought-provoking. Iyengar shows how we have an inherent need to choose, even if we may have the tendency to succumb to 'akrasia' (going against our better judgement). Moreover, there is somewhat of a memory/learning built through not being able to choose, ...

  • Wouter
    Jun 10, 2015

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

  • Max
    Apr 18, 2012

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

  • Prashant
    Jun 08, 2012

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

  • Roberto Andonie
    May 18, 2017

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

  • Utkarsh
    Nov 21, 2014

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

    A lot of studies have been mentioned in the book, there are lot of interesting psychological experiments referenced to support the point the author is trying to make. That way this book is really nice collection, summary of studies and experiments about choice and various aspects of it...

    I might have learned more from this book if I had read it closer to its publication date, but by now I had already read about almost all the studies the author mentions in other places. I think a better title for this book would be A Discussion on Choice. You aren't going to get any pr...

    Crazy spoiler for Sophie's Choice though ...

    Definitely raised some interesting points. I can definitely pick up some important tips and use them to become less obsessive about making the right choice. Anyway... I will have to give it a second read... ...

    I'm not so crazy about this book. I feel its reach exceeds its grasp. First I thought it was the pop-science genre in general, but when I picked up Brian Christian's Most Human Human I couldn't put it down. In comparison The Art of Choosing is sluggish, and sometimes a little out of l...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is written in the psychology/sociology arena similar to the Malcolm Gladwell style. There were some very interesting studies presented that give the reader insight into the decision making though process. It also identifies cultural differences effecting ...

    This book generally talks about how we make decisions. 1. Our choices are determined by two opposing systems: the automatic and the reflective. Marshmallow experiment. Those who eat the marshmallow immediately- AUTOMATIC. Delayed Gratification- REFLECTIVE. Reflective system lin...

  • David
    May 31, 2014

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

  • Chhun
    Oct 15, 2012

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

  • Tim Calkins
    Aug 07, 2012

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

    A lot of studies have been mentioned in the book, there are lot of interesting psychological experiments referenced to support the point the author is trying to make. That way this book is really nice collection, summary of studies and experiments about choice and various aspects of it...

    I might have learned more from this book if I had read it closer to its publication date, but by now I had already read about almost all the studies the author mentions in other places. I think a better title for this book would be A Discussion on Choice. You aren't going to get any pr...

    Crazy spoiler for Sophie's Choice though ...

    Definitely raised some interesting points. I can definitely pick up some important tips and use them to become less obsessive about making the right choice. Anyway... I will have to give it a second read... ...

    I'm not so crazy about this book. I feel its reach exceeds its grasp. First I thought it was the pop-science genre in general, but when I picked up Brian Christian's Most Human Human I couldn't put it down. In comparison The Art of Choosing is sluggish, and sometimes a little out of l...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is written in the psychology/sociology arena similar to the Malcolm Gladwell style. There were some very interesting studies presented that give the reader insight into the decision making though process. It also identifies cultural differences effecting ...

    This book generally talks about how we make decisions. 1. Our choices are determined by two opposing systems: the automatic and the reflective. Marshmallow experiment. Those who eat the marshmallow immediately- AUTOMATIC. Delayed Gratification- REFLECTIVE. Reflective system lin...

    Really interesting look at all kinds of choices and how we view choice in our lives. The nursing home studies were interesting (residents given choices, even very unimportant ones, were less likely to die and happier), as were some of the others. In one, Indian arranged marriages were ...

    Decision Making - what delicious fun and dreadful conundrums! Salesmen and teachers have always known that presentation matters, but Iyengar reveals just how much and why! In this exceedingly eclectic and very readable book, Iyengar discusses the tension between our automatic and refle...

    Simply written, engaging and thought-provoking. Iyengar shows how we have an inherent need to choose, even if we may have the tendency to succumb to 'akrasia' (going against our better judgement). Moreover, there is somewhat of a memory/learning built through not being able to choose, ...

    This book was written by Professor Sheena Iyengar, one of the researchers who did the terrific jam study. I refer to that study a lot in my classes and consulting work. In this book, Iyengar reviews why making decisions is so difficult and why we so often make bad choices. I found t...

  • Nilesh Injulkar
    Mar 28, 2018

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

    A lot of studies have been mentioned in the book, there are lot of interesting psychological experiments referenced to support the point the author is trying to make. That way this book is really nice collection, summary of studies and experiments about choice and various aspects of it...

  • Lokesh Jindal
    Jun 18, 2017

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

    A lot of studies have been mentioned in the book, there are lot of interesting psychological experiments referenced to support the point the author is trying to make. That way this book is really nice collection, summary of studies and experiments about choice and various aspects of it...

    I might have learned more from this book if I had read it closer to its publication date, but by now I had already read about almost all the studies the author mentions in other places. I think a better title for this book would be A Discussion on Choice. You aren't going to get any pr...

    Crazy spoiler for Sophie's Choice though ...

    Definitely raised some interesting points. I can definitely pick up some important tips and use them to become less obsessive about making the right choice. Anyway... I will have to give it a second read... ...

  • Jenn
    Oct 08, 2018

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

    A lot of studies have been mentioned in the book, there are lot of interesting psychological experiments referenced to support the point the author is trying to make. That way this book is really nice collection, summary of studies and experiments about choice and various aspects of it...

    I might have learned more from this book if I had read it closer to its publication date, but by now I had already read about almost all the studies the author mentions in other places. I think a better title for this book would be A Discussion on Choice. You aren't going to get any pr...

  • Rebecca McNutt
    Jul 10, 2016

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

  • Robyn Morgan
    Aug 22, 2017

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

  • Michelle
    Dec 13, 2018

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

    A lot of studies have been mentioned in the book, there are lot of interesting psychological experiments referenced to support the point the author is trying to make. That way this book is really nice collection, summary of studies and experiments about choice and various aspects of it...

    I might have learned more from this book if I had read it closer to its publication date, but by now I had already read about almost all the studies the author mentions in other places. I think a better title for this book would be A Discussion on Choice. You aren't going to get any pr...

    Crazy spoiler for Sophie's Choice though ...

    Definitely raised some interesting points. I can definitely pick up some important tips and use them to become less obsessive about making the right choice. Anyway... I will have to give it a second read... ...

    I'm not so crazy about this book. I feel its reach exceeds its grasp. First I thought it was the pop-science genre in general, but when I picked up Brian Christian's Most Human Human I couldn't put it down. In comparison The Art of Choosing is sluggish, and sometimes a little out of l...

    I really enjoyed this book. It is written in the psychology/sociology arena similar to the Malcolm Gladwell style. There were some very interesting studies presented that give the reader insight into the decision making though process. It also identifies cultural differences effecting ...

    This book generally talks about how we make decisions. 1. Our choices are determined by two opposing systems: the automatic and the reflective. Marshmallow experiment. Those who eat the marshmallow immediately- AUTOMATIC. Delayed Gratification- REFLECTIVE. Reflective system lin...

    Really interesting look at all kinds of choices and how we view choice in our lives. The nursing home studies were interesting (residents given choices, even very unimportant ones, were less likely to die and happier), as were some of the others. In one, Indian arranged marriages were ...

    Decision Making - what delicious fun and dreadful conundrums! Salesmen and teachers have always known that presentation matters, but Iyengar reveals just how much and why! In this exceedingly eclectic and very readable book, Iyengar discusses the tension between our automatic and refle...

    Simply written, engaging and thought-provoking. Iyengar shows how we have an inherent need to choose, even if we may have the tendency to succumb to 'akrasia' (going against our better judgement). Moreover, there is somewhat of a memory/learning built through not being able to choose, ...

    This book was written by Professor Sheena Iyengar, one of the researchers who did the terrific jam study. I refer to that study a lot in my classes and consulting work. In this book, Iyengar reviews why making decisions is so difficult and why we so often make bad choices. I found t...

    This book falls into my wheelhouse of topics used in various training forums and consulting efforts, but it certainly pertains to my personal life, as well. I knew many of the concepts and case studies referenced in it already, but I still found the reinforcement of them helpful. In ad...

  • Noelle
    Apr 10, 2019

    I had to read this non-fiction book quite slowly, over the course of a month, annoying friends and colleagues by citing Iyengar's studies as they attempted to choose items off a menu, though even this slow pace wasn't long enough to really make the information stick in my brain. Iyeng...

    Here are a few lines from the wiki profile of the author Sheena Iyengar was born in Toronto, Canada in 1969. Her parents had emigrated there from Delhi, India. ........................... When Iyengar was three years old, she was diagnosed with a rare form of retinitis pigment...

    By the time I finished this book I found I wanted to start it all over again. Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling, by not pursuing the field of decision-making. I am so bad at it, and yet I recognize that it is the key to navigating the modern world in the West, where the si...

    Interesting little book that really makes its readers think about what they choose, whether it's their purchases, their friends or even the simple act of saying yes or no. ...

    Outstanding and prolific, amazing book by an awesome author "We do the same thing in our lives- embracing information that supports what we already prefer or vindicates choices we made. After all, it feels better to justify our opinions rather than challenge them" -my pick of the q...

    Okay, so I'm probably starting out with a spoiler, but Sheela Iyengar is the person who conducted the jam study--that jam study! In books about choice, this is like being Keith Richards. For those of you unfamiliar, the jam study took place in a super-market: 20 kinds of jams on displa...

    Effectively written: takes the issue of choice from various perspectives, cultural, psychological, evolutionary, and business. The beginning and the final chapters were the best; the book really takes off after she describes her Menlo Park jam experiment. In general the coolest parts o...

    This book discusses some research (by the author and others) about how we make choices, and how having too many choices can lead to difficult decision making. But it's interesting that the author chooses to ignore all the existing research that contradicts the point she is trying to ma...

    I came across this book by accident so it wasn't a choice by adding it on my toread list. The more I read, the more it reminded me of a book I read last year; "Willpower" by mr. Baumeister, and I liked that book a lot. The Art of Choosing is a pleasant read full of stories and weird ps...

    I absolutely loved this book. The author goes to great lengths to clarify why we make the choices we make. She looks at how we are raised helps influence how we approach decisions, how other influence us in the moment of making a choice, how we really feel about the choices we make an...

    What I really learn about Sheena is that she taught me about her excitement and optimism in choosing. She didn't choose blindness, and being blind took many options off the table, but her bodily condition that she didn't choose let her to make the most of what she could choose. Whet...

    "Choice draws power from its promise of almost infinite possibility, but what is possible is also what is unknown. We can use choice to shape our lives, but we still face great uncertainty." And sometimes, in some very special circumstances, it's better not to have any choices at a...

    As the author detailed her social experiments on choice, I kept thinking how fun it would be to do those experiments. Being a social scientist sounds like fun! There's no but -- I still wish I could spend my day thinking of ways to see how people think. I first heard of Sheena Iyeng...

    p265: It is tempting to promote choice as the great equalizer--after all, that's what so many dreams, including the American one, are built on. ... We should not, however, take this to mean that faith, hope, and rhetoric alone are sufficient. Like the swimming rats in Richter's experim...

    Didn't like it quite as much as many of the reviewers on this site. Found the experminets with the rats (and I don't like rats) and the dogs (my uber dog lover Katherine would find these very disturbing) cruel to say the least. Also much of the book seemed to be what one could figure o...

    This is being compared to The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz ...

    I seldom write a long critique on a book because i) I choose the book because it is my decision ii) whatever I write should not alter other people POV iii) to back up with ii), hopefully providing a more neutral ground for other readers to decide to buy, to borrow, to read or just to r...

    There were two or three ideas here which by itself made the book worth it for me. One was more an examination of how choice is a modeling act, a defining action for our identity. The author uses the analogy of an sculpture in progress (our identity being the unfinished sculpture and ch...

    A lot of studies have been mentioned in the book, there are lot of interesting psychological experiments referenced to support the point the author is trying to make. That way this book is really nice collection, summary of studies and experiments about choice and various aspects of it...

    I might have learned more from this book if I had read it closer to its publication date, but by now I had already read about almost all the studies the author mentions in other places. I think a better title for this book would be A Discussion on Choice. You aren't going to get any pr...

    Crazy spoiler for Sophie's Choice though ...