Mountains of the Mind: A History of a Fascination

Mountains of the Mind: A History of a Fascination

Robert Macfarlane's Mountains of the Mind is the most interesting of the crop of books published to mark the 50th anniversary of the first successful ascent of Everest. Macfarlane is both a mountaineer and a scholar. Consequently we get more than just a chronicle of climbs. He interweaves accounts of his own adventurous ascents with those of pioneers such as George Mallory Robert Macfarlane's Mountains of the Mind is the most interesting of the crop of books published to mark the 50th anniver...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Mountains of the Mind: A History of a Fascination
Author:Robert Macfarlane
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:Mountains of the Mind: A History of a Fascination
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:320 pages pages

Mountains of the Mind: A History of a Fascination Reviews

  • Melinda
    Aug 05, 2015

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

  • Robert
    Mar 19, 2008

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

  • Jan
    Jun 29, 2009

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

  • Leanne
    Aug 07, 2017

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

    An excellent and engaging theory on the reasons people are attracted to mountaineering despite the intrinsic danger. Cohesive, thorough and beautifully balanced with personal and relevant climbing trips, it will doubtless be fuel for thought when I am next in that space. ...

    I really enjoyed this and got so much from it, mountaineering, adventure, literature, history. Just a beautiful awe-inspiring exploration of the natural environment and man's obsession with it. ...

    This favorite book inspired me to enjoy nature Mountains, valleys and the diversity of life. All macfarlane books are superb. ...

    A thrilling mixture of intellectual and physical adventure, seeing clouds from both sides, as it were. ...

    Why climb mountains? -To confront deep time as seen in large-scale geologic features "Yet there is also something curiously exhilarating about the contemplation of deep time. True, you learn yourself to be a blip in the larger projects of the universe. But you are also rewarded wit...

    To be possessed... Macfarlane, a mountain climber himself, takes great care to make one point clear: that it is not that mountains themselves have the power to possess us, but rather that possession occurs at precisely that disjuncture between the real and the imagined. A colloborat...

  • A.E. Reiff
    Jun 11, 2011

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

    An excellent and engaging theory on the reasons people are attracted to mountaineering despite the intrinsic danger. Cohesive, thorough and beautifully balanced with personal and relevant climbing trips, it will doubtless be fuel for thought when I am next in that space. ...

    I really enjoyed this and got so much from it, mountaineering, adventure, literature, history. Just a beautiful awe-inspiring exploration of the natural environment and man's obsession with it. ...

    This favorite book inspired me to enjoy nature Mountains, valleys and the diversity of life. All macfarlane books are superb. ...

    A thrilling mixture of intellectual and physical adventure, seeing clouds from both sides, as it were. ...

    Why climb mountains? -To confront deep time as seen in large-scale geologic features "Yet there is also something curiously exhilarating about the contemplation of deep time. True, you learn yourself to be a blip in the larger projects of the universe. But you are also rewarded wit...

    To be possessed... Macfarlane, a mountain climber himself, takes great care to make one point clear: that it is not that mountains themselves have the power to possess us, but rather that possession occurs at precisely that disjuncture between the real and the imagined. A colloborat...

    In projected volumes Macfarlane proposes to take up valleys, deserts and oceans of the mind. These sound plausible as any "collaboration of the physical forms of the world with the imagination of humans--a mountain of the mind" (18, 19). The value of collaboration is this, we can have ...

  • Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly
    Oct 13, 2018

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

  • Clio
    Sep 06, 2018

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

    An excellent and engaging theory on the reasons people are attracted to mountaineering despite the intrinsic danger. Cohesive, thorough and beautifully balanced with personal and relevant climbing trips, it will doubtless be fuel for thought when I am next in that space. ...

    I really enjoyed this and got so much from it, mountaineering, adventure, literature, history. Just a beautiful awe-inspiring exploration of the natural environment and man's obsession with it. ...

    This favorite book inspired me to enjoy nature Mountains, valleys and the diversity of life. All macfarlane books are superb. ...

    A thrilling mixture of intellectual and physical adventure, seeing clouds from both sides, as it were. ...

    Why climb mountains? -To confront deep time as seen in large-scale geologic features "Yet there is also something curiously exhilarating about the contemplation of deep time. True, you learn yourself to be a blip in the larger projects of the universe. But you are also rewarded wit...

  • Stephen
    Nov 08, 2010

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

  • Jo Bennie
    Jun 28, 2012

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

  • Jim
    Dec 28, 2010

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

  • Sarah O'Toole
    Jan 14, 2012

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

  • Yvonne
    Sep 07, 2015

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

  • Anneliese Tirry
    Apr 17, 2017

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

  • Louisa
    Jul 25, 2017

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

  • Alex
    Jul 20, 2017

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

    An excellent and engaging theory on the reasons people are attracted to mountaineering despite the intrinsic danger. Cohesive, thorough and beautifully balanced with personal and relevant climbing trips, it will doubtless be fuel for thought when I am next in that space. ...

    I really enjoyed this and got so much from it, mountaineering, adventure, literature, history. Just a beautiful awe-inspiring exploration of the natural environment and man's obsession with it. ...

    This favorite book inspired me to enjoy nature Mountains, valleys and the diversity of life. All macfarlane books are superb. ...

    A thrilling mixture of intellectual and physical adventure, seeing clouds from both sides, as it were. ...

    Why climb mountains? -To confront deep time as seen in large-scale geologic features "Yet there is also something curiously exhilarating about the contemplation of deep time. True, you learn yourself to be a blip in the larger projects of the universe. But you are also rewarded wit...

    To be possessed... Macfarlane, a mountain climber himself, takes great care to make one point clear: that it is not that mountains themselves have the power to possess us, but rather that possession occurs at precisely that disjuncture between the real and the imagined. A colloborat...

    In projected volumes Macfarlane proposes to take up valleys, deserts and oceans of the mind. These sound plausible as any "collaboration of the physical forms of the world with the imagination of humans--a mountain of the mind" (18, 19). The value of collaboration is this, we can have ...

    Macfarlane begins with his own history of a lifetime of pursuit of the elevated landscape and then discusses how the European mind came to see these high places as worthy of exploration even at high risk of loss of life and limb. What we now see as natural in terms of human desire to c...

    I know this, Mscfarlane's first book, suffered from being the last of his currently published books that I've read. all of the elements that make his writing so transcendently brilliant are there, but in proportions that are ever so slightly perfected in later books. this one leans a l...

  • Paul
    Jul 03, 2012

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

  • Andy
    Oct 22, 2012

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

    An excellent and engaging theory on the reasons people are attracted to mountaineering despite the intrinsic danger. Cohesive, thorough and beautifully balanced with personal and relevant climbing trips, it will doubtless be fuel for thought when I am next in that space. ...

    I really enjoyed this and got so much from it, mountaineering, adventure, literature, history. Just a beautiful awe-inspiring exploration of the natural environment and man's obsession with it. ...

    This favorite book inspired me to enjoy nature Mountains, valleys and the diversity of life. All macfarlane books are superb. ...

    A thrilling mixture of intellectual and physical adventure, seeing clouds from both sides, as it were. ...

  • Debbie
    Jan 29, 2014

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

    An excellent and engaging theory on the reasons people are attracted to mountaineering despite the intrinsic danger. Cohesive, thorough and beautifully balanced with personal and relevant climbing trips, it will doubtless be fuel for thought when I am next in that space. ...

    I really enjoyed this and got so much from it, mountaineering, adventure, literature, history. Just a beautiful awe-inspiring exploration of the natural environment and man's obsession with it. ...

  • Paul
    Nov 04, 2012

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

  • Jason
    Jan 15, 2015

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

  • Don
    Jul 20, 2015

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

  • J.
    Feb 17, 2013

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

  • Richard Newton
    May 01, 2013

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

  • Steffen Smit
    Jan 26, 2015

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

    An excellent and engaging theory on the reasons people are attracted to mountaineering despite the intrinsic danger. Cohesive, thorough and beautifully balanced with personal and relevant climbing trips, it will doubtless be fuel for thought when I am next in that space. ...

    I really enjoyed this and got so much from it, mountaineering, adventure, literature, history. Just a beautiful awe-inspiring exploration of the natural environment and man's obsession with it. ...

    This favorite book inspired me to enjoy nature Mountains, valleys and the diversity of life. All macfarlane books are superb. ...

  • Rob Ward
    Nov 16, 2013

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

  • Paul Stevenson
    Feb 06, 2014

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

    An excellent and engaging theory on the reasons people are attracted to mountaineering despite the intrinsic danger. Cohesive, thorough and beautifully balanced with personal and relevant climbing trips, it will doubtless be fuel for thought when I am next in that space. ...

  • John
    Aug 29, 2017

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

    An excellent and engaging theory on the reasons people are attracted to mountaineering despite the intrinsic danger. Cohesive, thorough and beautifully balanced with personal and relevant climbing trips, it will doubtless be fuel for thought when I am next in that space. ...

    I really enjoyed this and got so much from it, mountaineering, adventure, literature, history. Just a beautiful awe-inspiring exploration of the natural environment and man's obsession with it. ...

    This favorite book inspired me to enjoy nature Mountains, valleys and the diversity of life. All macfarlane books are superb. ...

    A thrilling mixture of intellectual and physical adventure, seeing clouds from both sides, as it were. ...

    Why climb mountains? -To confront deep time as seen in large-scale geologic features "Yet there is also something curiously exhilarating about the contemplation of deep time. True, you learn yourself to be a blip in the larger projects of the universe. But you are also rewarded wit...

    To be possessed... Macfarlane, a mountain climber himself, takes great care to make one point clear: that it is not that mountains themselves have the power to possess us, but rather that possession occurs at precisely that disjuncture between the real and the imagined. A colloborat...

    In projected volumes Macfarlane proposes to take up valleys, deserts and oceans of the mind. These sound plausible as any "collaboration of the physical forms of the world with the imagination of humans--a mountain of the mind" (18, 19). The value of collaboration is this, we can have ...

    Macfarlane begins with his own history of a lifetime of pursuit of the elevated landscape and then discusses how the European mind came to see these high places as worthy of exploration even at high risk of loss of life and limb. What we now see as natural in terms of human desire to c...

    I know this, Mscfarlane's first book, suffered from being the last of his currently published books that I've read. all of the elements that make his writing so transcendently brilliant are there, but in proportions that are ever so slightly perfected in later books. this one leans a l...

    Like all of Macfarlane's writing, the prose here is absolutely beautiful. His ability to describe the natural world truly makes you feel as though you are there with him. The only thing that keeps me from liking the book more is my inability to understand the drive to venture into land...

    An awesome amount of research underpinned an academic tome. Sadly the book missed much history as it overlooked or rather omitted the mesmerising and awe inspiring developments of the post Everest era. It lacked any obvious signs of love of the hills, and admiration for "the conquistad...

  • Brooke Salaz
    Aug 29, 2017

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

    An excellent and engaging theory on the reasons people are attracted to mountaineering despite the intrinsic danger. Cohesive, thorough and beautifully balanced with personal and relevant climbing trips, it will doubtless be fuel for thought when I am next in that space. ...

    I really enjoyed this and got so much from it, mountaineering, adventure, literature, history. Just a beautiful awe-inspiring exploration of the natural environment and man's obsession with it. ...

    This favorite book inspired me to enjoy nature Mountains, valleys and the diversity of life. All macfarlane books are superb. ...

    A thrilling mixture of intellectual and physical adventure, seeing clouds from both sides, as it were. ...

    Why climb mountains? -To confront deep time as seen in large-scale geologic features "Yet there is also something curiously exhilarating about the contemplation of deep time. True, you learn yourself to be a blip in the larger projects of the universe. But you are also rewarded wit...

    To be possessed... Macfarlane, a mountain climber himself, takes great care to make one point clear: that it is not that mountains themselves have the power to possess us, but rather that possession occurs at precisely that disjuncture between the real and the imagined. A colloborat...

    In projected volumes Macfarlane proposes to take up valleys, deserts and oceans of the mind. These sound plausible as any "collaboration of the physical forms of the world with the imagination of humans--a mountain of the mind" (18, 19). The value of collaboration is this, we can have ...

    Macfarlane begins with his own history of a lifetime of pursuit of the elevated landscape and then discusses how the European mind came to see these high places as worthy of exploration even at high risk of loss of life and limb. What we now see as natural in terms of human desire to c...

  • Janneke
    Mar 19, 2018

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

    An excellent and engaging theory on the reasons people are attracted to mountaineering despite the intrinsic danger. Cohesive, thorough and beautifully balanced with personal and relevant climbing trips, it will doubtless be fuel for thought when I am next in that space. ...

    I really enjoyed this and got so much from it, mountaineering, adventure, literature, history. Just a beautiful awe-inspiring exploration of the natural environment and man's obsession with it. ...

    This favorite book inspired me to enjoy nature Mountains, valleys and the diversity of life. All macfarlane books are superb. ...

    A thrilling mixture of intellectual and physical adventure, seeing clouds from both sides, as it were. ...

    Why climb mountains? -To confront deep time as seen in large-scale geologic features "Yet there is also something curiously exhilarating about the contemplation of deep time. True, you learn yourself to be a blip in the larger projects of the universe. But you are also rewarded wit...

    To be possessed... Macfarlane, a mountain climber himself, takes great care to make one point clear: that it is not that mountains themselves have the power to possess us, but rather that possession occurs at precisely that disjuncture between the real and the imagined. A colloborat...

    In projected volumes Macfarlane proposes to take up valleys, deserts and oceans of the mind. These sound plausible as any "collaboration of the physical forms of the world with the imagination of humans--a mountain of the mind" (18, 19). The value of collaboration is this, we can have ...

    Macfarlane begins with his own history of a lifetime of pursuit of the elevated landscape and then discusses how the European mind came to see these high places as worthy of exploration even at high risk of loss of life and limb. What we now see as natural in terms of human desire to c...

    I know this, Mscfarlane's first book, suffered from being the last of his currently published books that I've read. all of the elements that make his writing so transcendently brilliant are there, but in proportions that are ever so slightly perfected in later books. this one leans a l...

    Like all of Macfarlane's writing, the prose here is absolutely beautiful. His ability to describe the natural world truly makes you feel as though you are there with him. The only thing that keeps me from liking the book more is my inability to understand the drive to venture into land...

    An awesome amount of research underpinned an academic tome. Sadly the book missed much history as it overlooked or rather omitted the mesmerising and awe inspiring developments of the post Everest era. It lacked any obvious signs of love of the hills, and admiration for "the conquistad...

    This was such a lovely read on a subject that fascinates me. Rober Macfarlane has put incredibly extensive research into this work, and the result is refreshing, humorous and engaging. I especially enjoyed the way Macfarlane manages to visualise the lure of the mountains with his wor...

  • Jessica
    Sep 09, 2018

    Three centuries ago, no one was interested in mountains and other wild places. The land could not be cultivated, nor was there any point in possessing them and the people who inhabited these heights were considered a lesser human. They were considered no go areas. But in the middle of ...

    This book was so enchanting. It felt like being brought into another world with a fascinating multi-faceted guide, who was a mountaineer, scholar, nature-lover, avid reader and, most importantly, a poet. I couldn?t believe he was so young when he wrote the book. His use of language t...

    It's a miracle that the ranks of people who have scaled mountains and rambled around hilltops count one of the most brilliant writers I have ever read -- a man totally perceptive to the impact that mountains have had on a human psyche, and also able to get across so richly the impact t...

    Why do people climb mountains despite the obvious danger to their life and limb? This book attempts to answer that question. Many examples are given here but I?ll just pick one, that of George Mallory. He was just 35 years old with a young wife and three kids ages 6, 4 and a bab...

    This book not only helped me to further understand my own fascination with mountains and mountaineering but also helped me to see the landscape and the pursuit in new lights, only furthering my love for mountains. ...

    What a stunningly good book! In an age of dodgy politicans, greedy bankers, money-grubbers and profiteers, Wayne Rooney, X-Factor and disposable junk culture in general, reading something like this is a total balm for the senses. The book is so obviously a labour of love for McFarlane ...

    Ik zal het zeggen zoals het is: ik ben een fan van Robert Macfarlane en ik hou ervan om te lezen hoe hij oude of wilde plaatsen zelf verkent en hoe hij dat ervaart. Ik hou van zijn stijl en van zijn gedachtengang, ik hou ervan hoe hij eerlijk is, hoe hij een boek opbouwt tot een soort ...

    A wonderful read that is not just for those who feel the need to climb higher and go further than others have gone before, but also for those like me who are content to learn about the seemingly contradictory addictive drive for glory and zen like pursuit of inner enlightenment that ma...

    Really struggled with this at times, the geology parts and MacFarlane's personal mountain experiences were interesting, unfortunately there was not much on this, the bulk of the book was the history of mountain climbing and this is where I had issues. It felt messy, jumping about in ti...

    George Mallory, who may have been the first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest, was asked why he was motivated to do so. This book answers the question, both for Mallory and for everyone else (the author included) who walks in mountains, be they less than 1000 metres or more t...

    This is a beautiful exploration of mountains, and how they have been imagined across the centuries, and why people are drawn to them. Macfarlane is a wonderful writer (and has, by the way, a brilliant twitter account), although I think he overeggs his prose a little at times. There's a...

    Mcfarlane has written a book on the fascination with mountains and has provided us with a survey of the associative literature, history and personal accounts. He documents the changing attitudes of men to mountains. He tries to answer the question 'Why do people still go to mountains? ...

    Fascinating history of mountain climbing and the obsession especially of western Europeans with scaling the highest peaks in the world. I learned that it was Thomas Burnet, a Church of England churchman and philosopher, who studied and examined the surface of the earth and creation of ...

    Hmm, yes, writing style. This boy was too learned and it showed. I'm not sure if he meant it too, but again I couldn't engage with his philosophising over mountaineering. Even while much of it was about Mont Blanc and Chamonix which is where I was reading it. I'm writing this about two...

    This is a wonderfully written piece of text. I enjoyed the start of the book, and I enjoyed the end. I like the style of philosophising about the mountains, and questioning why people visit them, walk on them and climb. The only criticism I have is that the material is probably better ...

    Clearly well researched but packed with a lengthy history of geology and views from the 18th and 19th centuries which, while vaguely interesting, fell well short of what I hoped to find in this book. Mountains capture the imaginations of so many people because they inspire and challeng...

    A most fascinating history of mountains and mountaineering but I didn't find it an easy read. It is full of interesting facts and descriptions and is very different from other mountain climbing accounts. Erudite, philosophical and beautifully written, it explores man's 'fixation with d...

    A fascinating read about the Western fascination with mountains and mountain-climbing over the last 400 years. Some of the stories are thoroughly eye-watering and vertigo-inducing so I shall remain an armchair enthusiast! ...

    An excellent and engaging theory on the reasons people are attracted to mountaineering despite the intrinsic danger. Cohesive, thorough and beautifully balanced with personal and relevant climbing trips, it will doubtless be fuel for thought when I am next in that space. ...

    I really enjoyed this and got so much from it, mountaineering, adventure, literature, history. Just a beautiful awe-inspiring exploration of the natural environment and man's obsession with it. ...

    This favorite book inspired me to enjoy nature Mountains, valleys and the diversity of life. All macfarlane books are superb. ...

    A thrilling mixture of intellectual and physical adventure, seeing clouds from both sides, as it were. ...

    Why climb mountains? -To confront deep time as seen in large-scale geologic features "Yet there is also something curiously exhilarating about the contemplation of deep time. True, you learn yourself to be a blip in the larger projects of the universe. But you are also rewarded wit...

    To be possessed... Macfarlane, a mountain climber himself, takes great care to make one point clear: that it is not that mountains themselves have the power to possess us, but rather that possession occurs at precisely that disjuncture between the real and the imagined. A colloborat...

    In projected volumes Macfarlane proposes to take up valleys, deserts and oceans of the mind. These sound plausible as any "collaboration of the physical forms of the world with the imagination of humans--a mountain of the mind" (18, 19). The value of collaboration is this, we can have ...

    Macfarlane begins with his own history of a lifetime of pursuit of the elevated landscape and then discusses how the European mind came to see these high places as worthy of exploration even at high risk of loss of life and limb. What we now see as natural in terms of human desire to c...

    I know this, Mscfarlane's first book, suffered from being the last of his currently published books that I've read. all of the elements that make his writing so transcendently brilliant are there, but in proportions that are ever so slightly perfected in later books. this one leans a l...

    Like all of Macfarlane's writing, the prose here is absolutely beautiful. His ability to describe the natural world truly makes you feel as though you are there with him. The only thing that keeps me from liking the book more is my inability to understand the drive to venture into land...